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kisah
QUOTE (I_am_the_best @ Feb 20 2005, 10:30 PM)
Dear Kisah,

Do you know any good recipes for apple fritters? (Or any other type of fritter for that matter...) People are talking about them and I'm confuddled and I want to try them because they sound tastey. smile.gif

Thanks!
*


Fritters gooood. Pretty american though. There are a couple of ways to do them. Some grocery stores sell fritter batter (probably not in the UK) and to that you can add corn, apples, whatever. You can also use a sort of pre-mixed baking mix (like bisquick). Or you can do it from scratch. I'll post one recipe for each of the latter choices since if you have fritter batter available it will tell you how to use it on the box.
-------
2 c. Bisquick
2/3 c. milk
1 egg, just add
2 c. apples chopped sm (pref. golden delicious or jonathon)
Powdered sugar to sprinkle on apple fritters

Mix Bisquick, milk and egg until well blended. Stir in apples. Drop by small teaspoonfuls into deep hot fat (360-375 degrees). Turn and fry until golden brown on both sides. Drain on paper towels. Serve hot with syrup or powdered sugar. Yields 24 servings.

To use a minimum of fat for frying, melt fat in a deep 2 or 3 quart kettle which is only 7 or 8 inch wide across the top. Two cups of fat will give a depth of about 1 inch, sufficient for frying.

---------

1 c. flour
1 1/2 tsp. baking powder
3 tbsp. sugar
2/3 c. milk
1 egg
4-6 med. apples, diced

Mix all ingredients well. Fry in about 2 inches of Crisco oil. Each fritter takes about 8 to 10 minutes to fry. Drain on paper towel. Serve topped with powdered sugar or topping of your choice.

enjoy biggrin.gif
kisah
QUOTE (snoo @ Feb 21 2005, 05:14 PM)
Dear Kisah,

I have eaten mushrooms at least once a day for the last week and I was wondering if you had any good mushroom based recipes.
I'm a vegetarian and I don't eat cooked or puree tomato.

Any ideas?

The Mushroom fiend.

Edit: I don't do spices either, not so much as a pepper corn... the mildest spice to most makes me want to drink a river
*


Okay, I found something that will probably make you a very happy girl:

Mushroom recipes galore!

I also pulled a few from the web that looked particularly tastey. I didn't used to like mushrooms but there's a little hole in the wall called The Alibi Room in downtown Seattle that serves the most gorgeous portabellla stack. I have never ordered anything else as long as they have it in stock. I tried to find a similar recipe but was unsuccessful. I'm pretty sure you'll be pleased with the portabella section of that page though. I know I'm going to be cooking at least a few things off that list.
kisah
QUOTE (Wyvern @ Feb 21 2005, 09:18 PM)
QUOTE
Dumplings... I have to forwarn you- I've come across several different things that people call 'dumplings'. I think it's mainly due to the fact that there are several different ethnic takes or definitions of what a dumpling is.

I'd be happy to help you if you can describe what they were like (and what they might have been served with) when you got it right.
*


They were English? suet dumplings floating on a nice chicken casserole. Thing is Id managed to get them all fluffy and light which seems an unrepeatable event.
Sadly apart from mixed herbs and mustard seeds I cant remember what else I put in them.


Snoo, have you tried cooking them with butter and milk in their own juice until it thickens is nice with a little mustard, garlic or cheese too.
*



Here are two suet dumpling recipes that looked like they would work. I think that the key here is to add enough water without making them too wet. A soft dough is going to rise and be fluffy where a dryer dough wont have enough steam to lift it- hence little rocks. mad.gif tongue.gif

SUET DUMPLINGS

1 cup flour
4 ounces shredded beef suet1
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
Water

Stir the shredded suet through the flour, salt, and baking powder. Begin adding water while stirring until you have soft but moldable dough. Mold into small dumplings and add to meat if available.

----------
English Beef Stew with Suet Dumplings

Ingredients :

For the stew:
1 1/2 lb lean cubed beef
Tablespoon of cooking oil
1 lrg onion, sliced
3 lrg carrots, in chunks
1 lrg , raw potato cut into large cubes
2 pt beef stock
3 tsp plain flour
Seasoning
Dumplings:
8 oz plain flour
4 oz shredded beef suet
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
Water

Method :
In a large, lidded saucepan or casserole, fry the beef in the oil until well
browned. Don't worry if it sticks a little - the browning is important. Add
the onions and gently fry for five minutes. Add the flour and stir in well.
Add the carrots and potato to warm through, then add the stock, stir well
until the sauce thickens and boils. Cover and simmer gently for 25 minutes
Meanwhile, make the dumplings. Stir the shredded suet through the flour,
salt and baking powder. Begin adding water while stirring until you have a
soft but moldable dough.
After the stew has cooked 25 minutes, stir it through then add the dumplings
as balls about 2 inches diameter, to rest on top of the stew. Cover and
either continue to simmer on the hob for 20 minutes, or place in an oven,
uncovered, at 175C for 20 minutes.
The stew can also include turnip or swede instead of potato, and the
dumplings can include plenty of herbs - great with dried sage, thyme or
parsley.
Feyliya
Since pastry was your major, what was the easiest pastry recipe you have ever cooked?
kisah
QUOTE (Feyliya @ Feb 22 2005, 10:01 AM)
Since pastry was your major, what was the easiest pastry recipe you have ever cooked?
*


I don't know that there is actually an *easy* pastry recipe... I mean, obviously there are, but when you're paying for school they aren't going to spend a great deal of time using frozen just-rol dough or buying croisants from starbucks. You know? Pastry Arts is all about scientific measurements and precise direction following. There are areas where you can be creative but mostly, it's pretty boring and time consuming. dry.gif

Ever wanting to be pleasing though, I will post my very very favorite scone recipe. It's about as easy as pastry gets and they are super impressive if you've got company over.

The trick to scones (and lots of other pastry) is to know when to stop mixing. In this recipe you want to cut the cold butter in with knives, mix other ingredients with a fork, and try to avoid as much contact with your warm hands as possible before you knead the dough. Then; only knead it until it all sticks together uniformly. Lumps are okay! Also, blueberries are kind of fragile so... try to not smush too hard when you knead..

Blueberry Scones

Makes 8
For breakfast, serve these scones warm with butter and fruit preserves, or with traditional clotted cream (Devonshire cream) or Lemon Curd for an afternoon tea.

2 cups all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons sugar, plus more for sprinkling tops
1 tablespoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces
1 1/2 cups fresh blueberries, picked over and rinsed
1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
1/3 cup heavy cream, plus more for brushing tops
2 large eggs, lightly beaten

1. Preheat oven to 400, with rack in center. Place a Silpat baking mat on a baking sheet, and set aside.

2. In a large bowl, sift together flour, 3 tablespoons sugar, baking powder, and salt. Using a pastry cutter or two knives, cut in butter until the largest pieces are the size of small peas. Stir in blueberries and zest.

3. Using a fork, whisk together cream and egg in a liquid measuring cup. Make a well in the center of dry ingredients, and pour in cream mixture. Stir lightly with fork just until dough comes together. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface, and knead a few times to mix well.

4. Pat dough into a 6-inch square about 1 1/4 inches thick. Using a floured knife, cut into four 3-inch squares. Cut squares in half on the diagonal to form eight triangles. Transfer to prepared baking sheet. Brush tops with cream, and sprinkle with sugar. Bake until golden brown, 20 to 22 minutes. Transfer scones from baking sheet to wire racks to cool.
beleraphon
2 questions

What on earth is 'bisquick' ? and what can people in the UK use instead?

Can you do a quick conversion of US Cup sizes to UK measures of some sort? I'd suggest fluid oz as its a volume rather than weight measure so a cup of flour will weight different to a cup of sugar!
kisah
QUOTE (beleraphon @ Feb 22 2005, 11:22 PM)
2 questions

What on earth is 'bisquick' ? and what can people in the UK use instead?

Can you do a quick conversion of US Cup sizes to UK measures of some sort? I'd suggest fluid oz as its a volume rather than weight measure so a cup of flour will weight different to a cup of sugar!
*


Ahhh bisquick. tongue.gif I can actually buy it in our local Sainsbury's. All I can say by way of explaination is that bisquick is a 'just add water' sort of complete baking mix. You can make muffins, pancakes, dumplings, fritters... the list goes on and on. All out of bisquick. II don't know of a substitute if you can't find it in your grocery store but I bet it's in your baking isle and you just haven't had reason to notice.

Here's a fairly comprehensive list of US cups to UK weights by ingredients:

US cups to UK weights by ingredient
beleraphon
Thanks for the converter

I'm not an instant mix person, but I'll take a look.

Made bread last night
So so easy
So so good
Usurper MrTeapot
Dear Most Worthy Kisah

After an amazingly drunken night I aquired half a yam. Being the sort of hip experimental lad I am I would like to eat such yam.

But how?

Yours Never-encountered-a-yam-before Teapot.
kisah
QUOTE (MrTeapot @ Mar 7 2005, 09:37 PM)
Dear Most Worthy Kisah

After an amazingly drunken night I aquired half a yam. Being the sort of hip experimental lad I am I would like to eat such yam.

But how?

Yours Never-encountered-a-yam-before Teapot.
*



Yams are usually aquired whole, how did you get half a yam?

Also, it's worth asking if it is *actually* a yam, or really just a regular sweet potato. Here's some info to help you answer that question.

Sweet potato or yam?

Personally, I like to poke holes in the yam with a fork and bake it for about an hour, cut it in half, mash the insides with the back of said fork, and slather it in butter and a little brown sugar. Unfortunately this will probably be disasterous with just half a yam. Being a sweet tooth makes a yam the obvious option for unusual chips or mashers. Sometimes we mix yams and white potatoes for mash. You can make yam 'crisps' by slicing the yam *really* thinly on a kitchen thingy called a mandolin, putting some vegetable oil on them and baking them slowly on a medium low heat or frying them in oil.

Yams kick tushie big style. cool.gif
Usurper MrTeapot
*checks*

Yep it was a yam. Alas it has gone mouldy, mostly due to being only half a yam which I think is the result of taking it to 5-10 pubs and one club in the process...don't ask.

Nevermind, I actually intend to buy a yam from local stores to check them out for real so this will not be good advice wasted.

Cheers once again oh great Kisah.
depressed lonely crazy person
how does one make a BBQ chicken like you'd buy from a shop at home?
dragoncloud
hiya kisah
i used to have a wicked recipe for a home made sweet chilli sauce this made from fresh chillies,ginger,distilled vinegar sugar etc , was so easy to make by just blending and boiling the ingredients and involved very few skills but the end result was always class one this was giving to me buy a good friend whom as since died as coca cola every chef will have his own recipe any tips or suggestions for a new chilli sauce we could then sell on ebay make loads of cash i sell the sauce you can sell the toilet rolls hehe cheers wink.gif
snooodlysnoosnoosnoodle
Dear Mrs Jonman,

What is an appropriate accompanyment for a pasta or rice dish? I'm having issues finding something that isn't pure carbs!

Thanks,

drowing-in-Carbs

p.s. I'm veggie
beleraphon
try a green salad to go with rice or pasta?
snooodlysnoosnoosnoodle
QUOTE (beleraphon @ Apr 9 2005, 05:26 PM)
try a green salad to go with rice or pasta?
*


Yeah, but salad is so boring! I need something exciting!
Snugglebum the Destroyer
Sausage casserole goes really nice with basmalti rice.

*can't remember if Snoo is vegetarian*

Well, vege sausages are pretty nice, so it still works. smile.gif
snooodlysnoosnoosnoodle
QUOTE (Snugglebum the Destroyer @ Apr 9 2005, 06:31 PM)
Sausage casserole goes really nice with basmalti rice.

*can't remember if Snoo is vegetarian*

Well, vege sausages are pretty nice, so it still works.  smile.gif
*


hmm... that would be good but I don't like sausage casserole, at least not the one I tried... my mum made it a few weeks ago.

I am vegetarian, it was veggie sausage casserole and I still didn't like it, I picked out the sausages and potato and ate them after rinsing the sauce off them unsure.gif I'm not fussy, honest!
trunks_girl26
You could try making a veggie stir-fry.

That goes quite well with rice.
beleraphon
ah, sorry no brain moment, you said to go with a rice or pasta dish so I was thinking of a side, rather than rice or pasta veggies recipies.

Pasta:
Pesto just loads of pesto
Puttanesca (tomato & chilli sauce, lovely)
Really fine spagetti with an egg and lemon sauce is great
Mixture of mushrooms and garlic
Roasted meditaranian veggies (pepper, tomato, aubergine, courgette)

Rice:
Make into dolmades (greek stuffed vine leaves)
Rice salad with mixed peppers, scallions, fresh chilli...
Use as stuffing for peppers, marrow, tomato...
Add morrocan spices and dried soaked apricots, rasins and some pine nuts (soak fruit in 50:50 water:white wine) for morrocan rice
Egg-fry with oriental veg

Plus pasta or rice will add body to a soup, a simple veg broth with tiny pasta shells in is lovely, or a hearty creamy winter veg soup with rice is filling and good smile.gif
elphaba2
Dear Kisah,
Would you happen to have a good naan recipe? I adore the stuff, but I can't find it anywhere excepting restaurants and such..

Thanks!
-needs more deliciousness
Polocrunch
Kisah,

Do you know how to make a good salad? I haven't the faintest. What are good ingredients and what makes a good dressing?
kisah
Sorry, new weasle took ALL attention from hygeine, work, and forums.... Honest.

see?

okay, onto the cooking!
kisah
QUOTE (depressed lonely crazy person @ Apr 8 2005, 11:15 AM)
how does one make a BBQ chicken like you'd buy from a shop at home?
*



Hmmm... it would help to know what you mean by "BBQ chicken like you'd buy from a shop". The best way to sort this out is to find out where you live and then have you describe what qualities the chicken is lacking when you attempt to recreate it at home. I realize that this is a more lengthy process than usual but it's really the only way to get a proper answer (even if it is way overdue)

So... tell me about this chicken
kisah
QUOTE (dragoncloud @ Apr 8 2005, 11:33 AM)
hiya kisah
i used to have a wicked recipe for a home made sweet chilli sauce this made from fresh chillies,ginger,distilled vinegar sugar etc , was so easy to make by just blending and boiling the ingredients and involved very few skills but the end result was always class one this was giving to me buy a good friend whom as since died as coca cola every chef will have his own recipe any tips or suggestions for a new chilli sauce we could then sell on ebay make loads of cash i sell the sauce you can sell the toilet rolls hehe cheers  wink.gif
*



*rubs hands together suspiciously...* Would this be Dragoncloud and Kisah's Sweet chili sauce or Kisah and Drangoncloud's Sweet CHili Sauce?

Seriously though, I didn't even know that sweet chili sauce exsisted until I got transplanted to this country... and even now, I'm not a big fan. But... based on what you've told me already, here are some suggestions:

This one looks alot like what you describe... although it does call for 1 cup of sweet chili sauce in the recipe.... which is supposed to be a recipe for sweet chili sauce... I mean, if you've got it already, why are you making some?

Sweet Chili Sauce #1

This is a super easy Thai style Sweet Chili sauce

Sweet Chili Sauce #2

and THIS... well, this is the best sweet chili sauce recipe EVAH. I mean, what more can I say except that it is clearly more involving than the previous two. Looks like it might be worth the effort though.

Sweet Chili Sauce #3
kisah
QUOTE (snoo @ Apr 8 2005, 09:15 PM)
Dear Mrs Jonman,

What is an appropriate accompanyment for a pasta or rice dish? I'm having issues finding something that isn't pure carbs!

Thanks,

drowing-in-Carbs

p.s. I'm veggie
*



Ugh... drowning in carbs. I know the feeling. I've been packing breadless cheese sandwiches and hardboiled eggs for lunch as of late... Not because of Atkins, but because I really feel like carbohydrates are taking over the world. Oh well.

Looks like you got some good suggestions already but here's a few more:

This is so simple and SO good... I can't say enough good stuff about Portobellos, although Jonman and I ended up feeling a little Portobelloed out after a small stint of me going crazy for them.

Portobello Pasta

And while we're talking Portobellos
Portobello Stroganoff

As a side note, can somebody tell me if TVP is available in the UK because I never know whether to include those recipes or not.

This goes good with rice though... it doesn't NEED rice because it has tortillas

Mexican Bean Pie

I know that not everybody wants to come home from work/school and cook for an hour or two but remember that lots of recipes make enough to freeze portions in tupperware or tubbits and have homemade freezer dinner for later. Mr. Jonman has been known to spend a Sunday in the Kitchen cooking up lunch for his whole work week... I think that's pretty nifty.


Happy Cooking =)
kisah
QUOTE (elphaba2 @ Apr 13 2005, 06:15 PM)
Dear Kisah,
    Would you happen to have a good naan recipe? I adore the stuff, but I can't find it anywhere excepting restaurants and such..

Thanks!
-needs more deliciousness
*



Again... I didn't know about Naan until my transplant and unfortunately, we've been incredibly lazy and always bought Naan from Sainsbury's ethnic food aisle (indian, mexican gear, oriental stuff too). If you buy it prepackaged you can toss it in the oven a few minutes before you eat and, ta-da, fresh hot naan. I can dig up some recipes that *look* like they would work but I can't actually back any of these up personally.

Garlic and Corriander Naan

Naan recipe

Best of luck and let us know if you try one or both so we know if it was good. =)
kisah
QUOTE (Polocrunch @ Apr 13 2005, 06:46 PM)
Kisah,

Do you know how to make a good salad? I haven't the faintest. What are good ingredients and what makes a good dressing?
*



Do I know how to make a good salad?

Do *I* know how to make a GOOD salad!?!

No.

I know how to make a mouthwateringly orgasmic salad, I do.

Ask Jonman. (see what I did there?)

First, start with a crispy lettuce like romain, cos, or little gem. You can buy a bag of mixed herb salad or just put a big handful of fresh basil leaves in with your lettuce. I usually add sliced cucmbers, grated carrots, yellow or orange bell pepper slices, chopped up baby corn cobs, sweet pea pods, and lots of grated cheese (red leicester, double glouster, and cheddar are all good candidates).

You might want to put in thinly sliced red onion, roma or plum tomatoes, sliced ripe avocados, or fresh mushrooms too.

But here's the magic part. To make your salad so fantasticly wonderful you have to start thinking gourmet. Toasted pine nuts or almonds are perfect but make sure you keep an eye on them under the grill because they go from raw to burnt in 2.3 seconds sometimes. You can put 1/4 cup of sugar in a NON-STICK pan and heat until brown and bubbly then toss a generous handful of walnuts in the sugar before dumping the whole mess on a piece of wax paper and separating the nuts. When they cool off you'll have crispy candied walnuts to put on a salad with some bleu cheese or feta and summer berries (like raspberries, strawberries, and black berries). Guilty pleasure? Bacos... really fun bacon flavored soy chips like bacon bits you keep in your cupboard.

As for dressing, England is severely lacking in a sufficient range of store bought dressings but even in the tiny span of time I've been here it's gotten better. If you want to go it on your own here are some good dressing recipes.

Balsamic Vinaigrette
Citrus Poppy Seed Dressing
Raspberry Walnut Dressing (perfect for that summer fruit and walnut salad)
A bunch more good ones that I haven't tried before

Super good, happy cooking!
depressed lonely crazy person
QUOTE
So... tell me about this chicken


I don't know what to tell every respectable chips/fries? store has these tasty chickens which are called barbeque. they cook em on spits that rotate out the front but they put something on them first to make them go brown and tasty

so far to try and get the taste at home i've google'd and tried recipes containing
barbeque sauce
tomato sauce
honey
sugar
worchester sauce
salt pepper

by tring combinations of the above I've made some tasy concoctions but nothing like a chookshop chicken. sad.gif I'll see if I can find a picture not that it'll help.



P.S how does one make deep fried cammembert<serious sp my mum wants some for mothers day
elphaba2
I tried the plain naan recipe for dinner a few hours ago and it was pretty tasty--not that bad. Quite good with yogurt, in fact. I tried sticking walnuts into one of the rolled out "breads" before putting it in the pan, and that was dee-lightful. I've got a comparison of the two (walnutted and without) here

Tomorrow I'm trying the garlic one--thanks Kisah!
oxym0ronical
I think what you're looking for is a rotisserie chicken.
snooodlysnoosnoosnoodle
Dear Mrs Jonman,

How does one go about making cheese and broccoli bake, I've had it in resteraunts but I've never seen a recipe for it.

Any ideas, hints or tips?
kisah
QUOTE (elphaba2 @ Apr 24 2005, 02:29 AM)
I tried the plain naan recipe for dinner a few hours ago and it was pretty tasty--not that bad. Quite good with yogurt, in fact. I tried sticking walnuts into one of the rolled out "breads" before putting it in the pan, and that was dee-lightful. I've got a comparison of the two (walnutted and without) here

Tomorrow I'm trying the garlic one--thanks Kisah!
*


Yay! Thanks for going through the trouble to let us know how they turned out AND post a picture. I am most impressed. How did the garlic one turn out?
kisah
QUOTE (depressed lonely crazy person @ Apr 22 2005, 03:20 PM)
QUOTE
So... tell me about this chicken


I don't know what to tell every respectable chips/fries? store has these tasty chickens which are called barbeque. they cook em on spits that rotate out the front but they put something on them first to make them go brown and tasty

P.S how does one make deep fried cammembert<serious sp my mum wants some for mothers day
*



Okay... I can't really help you with the chicken. The way that they get it like that is a combination of ingredients not readily available in stores, equipment not found in household kitchens, and enough time to let them slowly sizzle as they spin around. The following is not a suggestion for how to make chip shop chicken but if you want a really tasty tender lovely crispy outside yummy chicken, here's the time consuming way to do it. If you soak your whole chicken completely covered by salt water in a big bucket/pot overnight (refridgerated or at least out in the cold garage or something) preheat the oven to Gas 5, or 350 and then you drain the bird, pat it with paper towels to dry it, rub a little bit of olive oil into the skin, season it with a healthy dose of salt, pepper, and maybe pick a dried herb to sprinkle lightly over it... stuff half an entire lemon, half a chopped onion, and a stick or two of celery up it's insides. Pick a pan that is oven safe (ie, no plastic handles) and has a big enough surface area to put a chicken in laying on it's back (ie. saute pan, stock pot, etc). Get the pan FREAKIN HOT (don't go crazy on me here and wreck your pans or anything, but it should be pretty damn hot) and put the whole bird in the pan and immediately put the whole pan in the oven. Cook it for 20 minutes per pound (500g) plus 20minutes for good measure and it should be at 165 degrees internally. Leave it alone for at least 5 if not 10 minutes to let all the juices redistribute and badabing... fantastic chicken.

Camembert... there are a few ways to pull this off. One of them is to bake the brie, cammembert, or other soft cheese. Jonman and I pull this trick out for guests sometimes and bake a whole wheel of cheese to do cheap fondue pretend. It is *very* nice.

You can buy a deep fat fryer or you can use a pan of oil. Both methods are going to require some sort of breading or batter. One way you'll dunk the whole deal in the oil for a prescribed amount of time and the other way you'll need enough oil to go half way up the cheese and you flip the whole thing over half way through... Admittedly though, the cheese is already terrible for you and deep frying it isn't helping... I'd go for baking it, personally. You can buy it in a wooden tray thing and bake it in the tray with the lid on at Gas 5, 350, for about a half hour or until the whole thing is warm/hot. Dip veggies, bread, or crackers in the cheese. Yum.

If you're serious about actually deep fat frying the cheese I'll find some batter recipes for you.
kisah
QUOTE (over_the_aybss @ May 9 2005, 02:34 AM)
dear Kisah,

Do you know where to find, are know any, good vegatarian recipes? I have one book but its mostly for parties and such, and I was hoping for some nice simple recipes.

Thanks
*



We have a bunch throughout the thread so you should definately check some of those out. I am a huge fan of Google for dinner which is essentially the practice of typing the word 'recipe' in conjunction with some stuff you know you have... like 'vegetarian recipe pepper rice' yeilded a ton of recipes for vegetarian curry. You can just flick through them until you find one you like. Unfortunately, neither Jonman nor I am a vegetarian so I haven't had to get used to the missing ingredients in this country. If you're in the states I highly recommend tvp in place of ground beef in just about any recipe you can find.
kisah
QUOTE (snoo @ May 8 2005, 08:40 PM)
Dear Mrs Jonman,

How does one go about making cheese and broccoli bake, I've had it in resteraunts but I've never seen a recipe for it.

Any ideas, hints or tips?
*


Anything special about the brocoli and cheese bake that you remember? Here's a few generic cheese and broccoli bake recipes for you to check out.

happy cooking biggrin.gif

Four Cheese Broccoli Bake

Broccoli Cheese Casserole

Holiday Broccoli Bake
elphaba2
QUOTE
Yay! Thanks for going through the trouble to let us know how they turned out AND post a picture. I am most impressed. How did the garlic one turn out?


I have just that little of a life. The garlic was quite yummy, and I've made it a few times for dinner, but I have to force my family to do extreme toothbrushing immediately following. With a bit of fiddling, I found that a combination of the two recipes yielded the most tasty sort of results, (dough made and cooked in the "plain naan" manner, and then brushing the butter/garlic/coriander suggested from the second on before cooking). Perhaps it's just my lack of a brick oven, but the garlic recipe has a tendency to make dense naan, unlike the pan-frying method. At any rate, it's good and I feed it to my friends in large amounts so I can cook them.

...What?
CommieBastard
QUOTE (kisah @ May 10 2005, 04:11 PM)
Okay... I can't really help you with the chicken.  The way that they get it like that is a combination of ingredients not readily available in stores, equipment not found in household kitchens, and enough time to let them slowly sizzle as they spin around.
*


Just out of interest, what ingredients are those?
depressed lonely crazy person
QUOTE
QUOTE(kisah @ May 10 2005, 04:11 PM)
Okay... I can't really help you with the chicken.  The way that they get it like that is a combination of ingredients not readily available in stores, equipment not found in household kitchens, and enough time to let them slowly sizzle as they spin around.





Just out of interest, what ingredients are those?


Yeah!!!! what are those? leep in mind that I'm a chicken nut with only 23 hours of my week not my own (not including sleep and clean-up time but what can you do)
kisah
QUOTE (CommieBastard @ May 12 2005, 08:14 PM)
QUOTE (kisah @ May 10 2005, 04:11 PM)
Okay... I can't really help you with the chicken. The way that they get it like that is a combination of ingredients not readily available in stores, equipment not found in household kitchens, and enough time to let them slowly sizzle as they spin around.
*


Just out of interest, what ingredients are those?
*




unsure.gif

Ask Jonman!
Ashbless
Dear Kisah,

I was given a nice sweet relish featuring peaches and sweet red pepper. The lady who made it suggested serving it over cream cheese. I was wondering if it would also go well with cheese. A soft cheese like brie? What cheese would you suggest? Also what crackers?

Thanks,
Thinks she sees party munchie possibilities.
depressed lonely crazy person
Dear Mrs Jonman

Is it right that cooking pea and ham soup makes me feel like a domestic goddess? Do you like pea and ham soup better with green peas or yellow?
Do you have any tips onn how to make better pea and ham soup?


My current recipe
2 cups of green split peas
1 cup of pearl barley
a bacon hock
enough water to cover the lot by two inches
some salt
4 hours
acid_rain_child
Dearest Ms Kisah,

My mother goes rock fish and flounder fishing every weekend, and we have tons of fish in the freezer, but only a couple of recipes. One is to stuff the rock fish with a crab-mayo-herb mix (the food of the gods *drools*) and the other is your general fry-it-up-and-eat-it.

Do you know or could you please find recipes you think would be good for flounder or rock fish?

While we're mentioning seafood, it's crab season. Know of any good crab meat or crabcake recipes?

Thank you!
Ashbless
Important cooking tip. If the vegetable shortening has turned a light green and has a funny smell then it has gone bad. DO NOT USE.
Jonman
Just a quickie input here - the computer at Chez Kisah was injured in the line of duty, and is currently recuperating at a local resort. It should be returning to work in a matter of days, but until that time, she's unlikely to pop her head in.

Mr. Kisah
Jonman
A matter of days, my heiney...

anyway, sorry for the (usual) delay. At least I had a good excuse (sortof).

Promise to get to all the lovely questions soon! At the moment I'm having a tough week trying to re-create my childhood dinner favs for Jonman when I can't find the right sorts of ingredients.

I've been looking all over for a tube of ready made croissant dough and I know that we have even bought them in the UK at least once. They are terrible and a disgrace to chefs all across america but god bless my mom, she loved them, so I need to get my hands on some. I know sometimes it's hard to admit to these guilty pleasures but if you have any idea which lovely grocery store you have seen them in, I would appreciate it. biggrin.gif

Kisah
lebigcheeseneit!
QUOTE (kisah @ Feb 18 2005, 06:15 AM)
QUOTE (beleraphon @ Feb 17 2005, 11:11 PM)
Dear Kisah,

I bought Tofu instead of a carton of Passata by mistake the other day, but thought I'd try it.
I followed the suggestion on the back, drain Tofu, marinate in soy for a bit then stir fry till golden and add veg and chilli.
Is it supposed to look and taste like polystyrine with the texture of firm hair-gel or did I mess up? The veg and sauce were really good, but the Tofu was rank and disgusting!

I can usually cook really really well so I was very dissapointed that this went so badly sad.gif

bel.
*


Ahhh Tofu... some swear by it, others despise it and it's no wonder, most people don't know what to do with it. Personally, I usually leave my tofu preparation to the experts (sushi chefs, chinese restaraunts, etc). I don't dislike tofu, I've just never been hugely successful with it. Here are a couple of things I can tell you about tofu:

....

Soynuts and Soynut butter is very yum. If you don't like peanut butter don't bother with soynut butter. Roasted soy nuts are like a super yummy moreish lovely treat that isn't very bad for you.

Cook with love. wub.gif
*



my brother and i were raised vegetarians by our parents (mom-13, dad-18-becomming veggies) and we eat tofu at least once a week. more if i can help it. my two faveorite ways are:

heating oil in a pan, and throwing in cubed tofu-medium consistency, drained. let it brown on all sides, eat in a bowl with rice and soysauce, broccoli if you are a goody two shoes.

slice a block of tofu into slices (er...) and marinate. we use stuff in a bottle, if youre crafty and spent 3K on school, or like marinating...ANYWAY! put the strips on a hot grill and cook until they brown. we like them well done, but, ah, well.

morning star is a brand of TVP sold in america (do they have it in the UK?) they make buffalo wings, burgers,etc.

seitan is a wonderful product made of wheat gluten, also very versitile. i reccoment hot sauce, then baked.

hollistically yours,
ari
Mata
Commie's thread has reminded me:

While in Italy, Sues and I had a lovely sauce on our salads. After having this for a few days we asked what it was and were told that it was a yoghurt sauce. This rather surprised us because it had no hint of yoghurt, mint, or any of the usual flavours you might expect to get with a yoghurt sauce. Weird. In fact it tasted a lot more like some sort of vinegarette dressing, but a particularly yummy one.

Any idea what might be this strange yoghurt sauce that doesn't taste of yoghurt? I've looked on the web for ideas but all the ones I've made have tasted nothing like it.
Phyllis
Dear Kisah,

I was wondering...is there any English equivalent of corn syrup? Do you know if golden syrup can be used as a substitute in recipes? Google is proving to be most unhelpful in this area.

Yours in American confusion,

Cand
froggle-rock
Dear Lady O Foody

I'm going round to the fella's on Friday to make him a meal. I suggested a soup, as I like soup, he likes soup, and soup is summit I can cook. I usually cook broth type soups with plain dumplings, coz I'm good at it. Thing is, he dunt eat gluten. So oats, wheat, all that is out of the question. I don't mind trying summit new, just not feeling up to any radical soups. Any recipies you'd suggest?

Yours,

Foodin Froggin

PS: Peas are ebil, and onions make me fart.
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