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Erin
well..im going to be taking Brazilian JuJitsu lessons soon. happy.gif It looks fun. its a mix between Judo and karate. it does ground fighting and standing up. Anyhowwww...yeah...i'm going into it. Anyone else do any sort of martial arts? biggrin.gif
little_bear
I used to do Karate ; was pretty damn good at it too. Eventually I packed it in because the instructor was a pain in the arse. Plus, it was bloody hard work - I was often knackered before we did any sparring.

However, regarding your choice of martial art ...

I've often heard from people who practise Ju Jitsu that it isn't actually of use should you find yourself in a position to use it. If someone throws a punch at you, it's difficult to 'do' anything with what you've learned.
gothictheysay
When I was much, much younger, I took karate for a couple years. I don't really remember much about it, except for torturous amounts of push-ups and sit-ups and that waiting to get another stripe on your belt. I think I've forgotten everything, heh. However, my father is extremely skilled in martial arts, mostly karate. I am not sure what other types he knows... but if someone tried to attack him, they'd probably be on the floor in an instant. It's nice to have someone like that around to make you feel safe. =D Hope you have fun with your class - there are many positive aspects to self-defense classes that I've heard of.
tv with legs
i used to, but i quit cause the instructer held me back like 8 times saying that i was a good role module fo the green belts. i shouldof been like a freakin black belt. i think he hated me, so,i think you should not do it.
Mata
Funny you should mention this. Tonight I'm going to be trying out a new Wing Chun club tonight. Wing Chun was developed by a nun to help protect the women in the village from being attacked, and as such it requires very little physical strength but instead relies on simple physics to let even the smallest person have a reasonable chance against a bigger opponent. It is also quite brilliantly effective!

TV With Legs: could you please put some capitals in your messages? I like to keep up the standard of English on the forums, and it's good practise for when you need to use it in essays and later in life. Thanks!
Aria
I used to take karate, and I sporadically attend a local aikido club. I have to say, aikido seems a lot more practical in terms of self defense than karate.
damned and dastardly
I do Chai Quon Doe wchich is REALLY hard to spell ^^. It's good fun, and I've learnt a lot from my instructer, Kerri, who is smaller than me and all blackety black belt. Have a good time, it's not for everyone but I hope it works out!
Mata
Brazilian Jujitsu... Is that the something-or-other brothers? Gracey brothers... Something like that?

Little Bear - Pracitioners of Brazilian Jujitsu often are major opponents in the Ultimate Fighting Championship, suggesting that it really can be a very effective style. Now, if you want to talk about pointless martial forms then Karate is the place to start! I've only encountered people who do Karate a few times, but when I ask for a demonstration and go to hit them they usually say 'no, you're not doing it right!' Call me crazy, but a martial art that doesn't adapt to the way that the person is hitting you seems a bit silly.

My Wing Chun class went really well, so I think I'll be going regularly to that. I'm really pleased that I've found an instructor that I get on well with in my local area. Actually, the class is about five minutes walk from my house! It's great fun to be learning with people who know what they're doing again. I've enjoyed sparring with people who do different forms over the years (and I've found Wing Chun to generally be excellent in preventing most attacks) but there's nothing like being with people who know the form better than you do!
arachnidoc17
If there were any martial arts classes I would take, it would be krav maga.

If someone is gonna assault me, they're gonna have to learn not to the hard way.
Mata
Isn't that the one used by the Israeli special forces? Nasty stuff... Personally I'd rather just wind the person and not be arrested for assault!
voices_in_my_head
Aw.... but that's no fun!

I think that the only martial art class around here is for karate, and If I want to break a board in half, I'll use a chainsaw. Plus, Wouldn't that require some sort of grace?
I trip over my own feet half of the time. Enough said.
arachnidoc17
QUOTE (Mata @ Jul 11 2005, 10:22 PM)
Isn't that the one used by the Israeli special forces? Nasty stuff... Personally I'd rather just wind the person and not be arrested for assault!
*

"to do as much damage in as little time as possible"


It's technically still legal until they A) stop struggling or cool.gif tell you to stop.
Erin
QUOTE (little_bear @ Jul 10 2005, 02:41 PM)
I used to do Karate ;  was pretty damn good at it too.  Eventually I packed it in because the instructor was a pain in the arse.  Plus, it was bloody hard work - I was often knackered before we did any sparring.

However, regarding your choice of martial art ...

I've often heard from people who practise Ju Jitsu that it isn't actually of use should you find yourself in a position to use it.  If someone throws a punch at you, it's difficult to 'do' anything with what you've learned.
*


well..i dunno..the ultimate fighty thingy championship was won using jujitsu. the guy thats teaching me was taught by the winner. But..i get along well with people..never been in a fight before..so i dont think i'd need to use it for self defense.
Erin
QUOTE (damned and dastardly @ Jul 11 2005, 10:49 AM)
I do Chai Quon Doe wchich is REALLY hard to spell ^^. It's good fun, and I've learnt a lot from my instructer, Kerri, who is smaller than me and all blackety black belt. Have a good time, it's not for everyone but I hope it works out!
*



my sisters boyfriend takes that....what do you do in it?
Erin
QUOTE (Mata @ Jul 11 2005, 04:34 PM)
Brazilian Jujitsu... Is that the something-or-other brothers? Gracey brothers... Something like that?

Little Bear - Pracitioners of Brazilian Jujitsu often are major opponents in the Ultimate Fighting Championship, suggesting that it really can be a very effective style. Now, if you want to talk about pointless martial forms then Karate is the place to start! I've only encountered people who do Karate a few times, but when I ask for a demonstration and go to hit them they usually say 'no, you're not doing it right!' Call me crazy, but a martial art that doesn't adapt to the way that the person is hitting you seems a bit silly.

My Wing Chun class went really well, so I think I'll be going regularly to that. I'm really pleased that I've found an instructor that I get on well with in my local area. Actually, the class is about five minutes walk from my house! It's great fun to be learning with people who know what they're doing again. I've enjoyed sparring with people who do different forms over the years (and I've found Wing Chun to generally be excellent in preventing most attacks) but there's nothing like being with people who know the form better than you do!
*



yup, mata, correct about the first part im pretty sure.
Erin
QUOTE (Aria @ Jul 11 2005, 08:24 AM)
I used to take karate, and I sporadically attend a local aikido club. I have to say, aikido seems a lot more practical in terms of self defense than karate.
*


if i finish jujitsu i want to do aikido. ..maybe when im an adult. you dont really have to put much force i think. it doesnt hurt others..just keeps them from hurting you, right?
Aria
QUOTE (Erin @ Jul 12 2005, 03:18 AM)
if i finish jujitsu i want to do aikido. ..maybe when im an adult. you dont really have to put much force i think. it doesnt hurt others..just keeps them from hurting you, right?
*



Essentially, yes. You use leverage, and their own force against them. Basically, what you put in, you get out.

In my school, you don't really learn how to attack at all. Just defend yourself. It may vary from school to school, I don't know. But in general, aikido is a defensive martial art, rather than an offensive one.
artist.unknown
I just got my black belt this past Saturday. *does happy dance like crippled penguin* I was tested by one of the FIVE grandmasters of the highest rank in the country, and had my certificate filled out by him. It was terrifying, but I survived. Won't be breathing properly for a while though. ^^

I practice in the Chun Do Kwan school of Taekwon-do, which is the most traditional.

Mata, Wing Chun? As in the song? o.O
Mata
AU: nice one! That's a really great achievement. Taekwon-do is a very energetic martial art and pretty hard to get really good at. I'm very impressed smile.gif

I didn't know that there is a song called Wing Chun... Who's it by?

Wing Chun was what Bruce Lee started out with before developing Jeet Kun Do. It's a very, very efficient martial form, emphasising scarcity of strength and movement for the greatest effect: why move your arm in a swinging motion when you can get the same effect in six inches with no power required? In basic terms there are only about six moves that you need to know how to use and then you can be very effective at stopping people from attacking you. It really is that simple. Some martial arts, such as Tai Chi (yes, that is a martial art, and actually a really quite devastating one too), can take ten years before you become skilled enough to use them in a situation that requires force, Wing Chun can get you there and with a decent chance in around a year with one class a week.

I first learnt it about ten years ago and I've kept on training by myself in the meantime. I would train normally a few times a week, even if it's simply going through some of the basic moves. I was really pleased that I could still do it all, and I think the instructor was happy to have someone with a slightly different style to test his methods against! It's amazing how the body never really forgets how to do things. The instructor would name a move he wanted me to try, I wouldn't recognise the name, but as soon as he would do the approach my hands and legs knew what to do.
CommieBastard
Mata, what you said about karate not being useful: I've heard that until you're a black belt, you're not really doing karate. I wouldn't know personally, however, having never fought a karate practitioner wink.gif

Like arachnidoc's Krav Maga, you could do worse than look at what's used by professionals whose job is to disable very dangerous people as quickly as possible. The Russian Spetznaz use a technique called Systema, which is gradually making itself known outside Russia...
DarkInferno
I've done a few martial arts and I would agree that until the later belts in karate, you aren't learning karate, more training to be able to learn karate.

(I also found it a good building block on which to train other martial arts)
Jonman
Additionally, a lot of Western karate classes will teach sport karate, which isn't a combat form - it's katate that's been adapted and limited to fit into a competition sport.

Hence, it's rubbish at actually fighting. Any martail art that includes freeform sparring however will teach you an incredible amount about how to handle yourself in a rumble. It's amazing how quickly you learn to avoid being kicked in the head.
smallcuteanddeadly
I practised and taught Aikido for years, as well as learning a freestyle form of Karate at the same time. I highly recommend learning a defensive and a striking art if you want your martial arts to be practical. I don't believe ANY martial art is designed to be a stand alone art.

Having said that, my daughter will be starting Judo the second I find a good instructor who'll take 'em young. Judo is (in my opinion anyway) the last true full-contact martial art, and an excellent base for practical self defense, because 9/10 street fights end up on the floor. Grappling is highly underestimated I think.

Just my views.
little_bear
QUOTE (Mata @ Jul 12 2005, 01:34 AM)
Little Bear - Pracitioners of Brazilian Jujitsu often are major opponents in the Ultimate Fighting Championship, suggesting that it really can be a very effective style. Now, if you want to talk about pointless martial forms then Karate is the place to start! I've only encountered people who do Karate a few times, but when I ask for a demonstration and go to hit them they usually say 'no, you're not doing it right!' Call me crazy, but a martial art that doesn't adapt to the way that the person is hitting you seems a bit silly.
*

Hehe, I never said Karate was any good either though. wink.gif

Imo, if someone goes to punch you, the best fighting style you can adopt is good old fashioned boxing. Of course, in real fights people don't just punch like gentlemen, they claw, and kick and gouge. Meh, just my opinion.
PsychWardMike
Mata, AU, I think you're thinking of the 80s one hit wonder "Everybody have Fun Tonight" by Wang Chung.

Anyway, I took a class built of many styles but predominantly Shotokan for many years before I moved. I obtained the fourth belt up, but I sparred a few "black belts" from some other schools in a friendly competition and wiped the floor with them... to the point we weren't ever invited back! I did everything by the book, too. I suppose they were just sore losers! laugh.gif

Anyway, have fun with the martial arts, but remember to take them seriously. For the love of God, don't be one of those jerks who goes around bragging only to have nothing to back it up with.
gothictheysay
QUOTE
If I want to break a board in half, I'll use a chainsaw.


But... but... you miss the rush! I've done it a couple times, my father's broken bricks... It's exhilarating. Not that hard, either - I was pretty young the last time I did it. Heck, I'm out of practice and I'd try again.

I'm not sure if my father's learned anything else other than karate, but it can be adaptable - I like to play the "pretend to strike Dad anywhere and he has a quick move to take you down" game. He tires of that one quickly though. tongue.gif
Mata
QUOTE (gothictheysay @ Jul 12 2005, 01:57 PM)
QUOTE
If I want to break a board in half, I'll use a chainsaw.

But... but... you miss the rush! I've done it a couple times, my father's broken bricks... It's exhilarating. Not that hard, either - I was pretty young the last time I did it. Heck, I'm out of practice and I'd try again.
*

When the sentient brick-people invade it'll come in handy too. Then we'll all be laughing out of the other side of our face... Which might be interesting to see us try. Hm.

I have a problem with a martial art that trains you to defend against distinct punches, giving the impression of being a self-defence system, but only actually makes you able to use it all in any practical way after years of training.
smallcuteanddeadly
Mata, do you mean a specific martial art, or defense arts in general?

Generally if you look at it closely it's more the direction of the body movement behind the punch than the actual punch. A lot of people look at the punch, because it's the clearest indication of where the body's going. Yes, it can take years to understand that. But it certainly doesn't have to. I've had plenty of inexperienced students who understood that within months of starting.
Erin
QUOTE (PsychWardMike @ Jul 12 2005, 05:21 AM)
Mata, AU, I think you're thinking of the 80s one hit wonder "Everybody have Fun Tonight" by Wang Chung.

Anyway, I took a class built of many styles but predominantly Shotokan for many years before I moved.  I obtained the fourth belt up, but I sparred a few "black belts" from some other schools in a friendly competition and wiped the floor with them...  to the point we weren't ever invited back!  I did everything by the book, too.  I suppose they were just sore losers! laugh.gif

Anyway, have fun with the martial arts, but remember to take them seriously.  For the love of God, don't be one of those jerks who goes around bragging only to have nothing to back it up with.
*



heh. i wouldnt talk myself up. i like avoiding fights with people..
Erin
QUOTE (little_bear @ Jul 12 2005, 05:10 AM)
QUOTE (Mata @ Jul 12 2005, 01:34 AM)
Little Bear - Pracitioners of Brazilian Jujitsu often are major opponents in the Ultimate Fighting Championship, suggesting that it really can be a very effective style. Now, if you want to talk about pointless martial forms then Karate is the place to start! I've only encountered people who do Karate a few times, but when I ask for a demonstration and go to hit them they usually say 'no, you're not doing it right!' Call me crazy, but a martial art that doesn't adapt to the way that the person is hitting you seems a bit silly.
*

Hehe, I never said Karate was any good either though. wink.gif

Imo, if someone goes to punch you, the best fighting style you can adopt is good old fashioned boxing. Of course, in real fights people don't just punch like gentlemen, they claw, and kick and gouge. Meh, just my opinion.
*



well. in jujitsu...its not against the rules to do those sort of things. you can bite, scratch, tear, gouge, eye poking, etc. i hang around at a jujitsu forum for people who actually do it too, and they say its accepted.
pvcfairy
I did jitsu for a while and if nothing else it gave me abit of confidence that if the situation arose I could get out of it, even if it was running away.
As for the biting pinching and scratching it was fun to get away with that on the mats ocasionally but I many stuck to toe or ear lob squezing, rib rubbing the odd bit of tickling those ones always had the suprise element to them...
damned and dastardly
Oh, we do routine things, kick pads, learn new moves. I started two months ago so I'm still a bit of a begginer
Erin
QUOTE (damned and dastardly @ Jul 12 2005, 11:31 AM)
Oh, we do routine things, kick pads, learn new moves. I started two months ago so I'm still a bit of a begginer
*

still...its better than me! cuz i havent even began my martial arts lessons yet.
Erin
QUOTE (pvcfairy @ Jul 12 2005, 10:20 AM)
I did jitsu for a while and if nothing else it gave me abit of confidence that if the situation arose I could get out of it, even if it was running away.
As for the biting pinching and scratching it was fun to get away with that on the mats ocasionally but I many stuck to toe or ear lob squezing, rib rubbing the odd bit of tickling those ones always had the suprise element to them...
*



heh. i'm just doing it becuz..well..i gotta do somethin..other than just sittin around. i've never even been in a fight before..other than just fighting for the hell of it. i'll finally learn a real fighting style..instead of "beating the crap out of the other person."


biting, and things like that are what i do anyhow when fighting, i do it without thinking...so i may have to break that habit in my lessons. unsure.gif
smallcuteanddeadly
QUOTE (pvcfairy @ Jul 12 2005, 07:20 PM)
I did jitsu for a while and if nothing else it gave me abit of confidence that if the situation arose I could get out of it, even if it was running away.
As for the biting pinching and scratching it was fun to get away with that on the mats ocasionally but I many stuck to toe or ear lob squezing, rib rubbing the odd bit of tickling those ones always had the suprise element to them...
*


Pressure points tongue.gif

Ahhh, I LOVED demonstrating pressure points... Very useful too. Good way of showing someone that size doesn't correlate (sp?) to how much pain can be inflicted.

Thank you all, you've just given me the kick up the bum I needed to get training again.
Erin
QUOTE (smallcuteanddeadly @ Jul 12 2005, 12:43 PM)
QUOTE (pvcfairy @ Jul 12 2005, 07:20 PM)
I did jitsu for a while and if nothing else it gave me abit of confidence that if the situation arose I could get out of it, even if it was running away.
As for the biting pinching and scratching it was fun to get away with that on the mats ocasionally but I many stuck to toe or ear lob squezing, rib rubbing the odd bit of tickling those ones always had the suprise element to them...
*


Pressure points tongue.gif

Ahhh, I LOVED demonstrating pressure points... Very useful too. Good way of showing someone that size doesn't correlate (sp?) to how much pain can be inflicted.

Thank you all, you've just given me the kick up the bum I needed to get training again.
*



thats good i guess. tongue.gif biggrin.gif glad u could get back to it. congratulations.
PsychWardMike
Pfft. I fear no pressure points! laugh.gif

Actually, for part of my training, my sensei nullified all of my pressure points by demonstrating them... very often. I have some deadened nerves in my pressure point areas now, but they don't work anymore. Fair trade?
gothictheysay
Sure, but pressure points still work on more people than not... They're quite handy indeed. happy.gif

I think the more you practice, though, you'll start to look at the way that you're being attacked, not the punch. I.e. if someone tries to go towards a certain part of your body, there are several techniques to defend yourself... I'm sure there are a lot of people who've learned karate, get into a fight or something, and the karate isn't as applicable. However, the more you learn, the more you can use it. smile.gif

Heh... the brick-people reminds me of a Gary Larson cartoon. It's more about learning the strike, I think, than breaking the brick... but it's not for everybody and yeah, brick-breaking isn't something you're going to use every day. tongue.gif
Mata
Oh definitely. A range of styles is very useful in any situation. While my home-ground is defintely Wing Chun, I've got a pretty decent working knowledge of Tai Chi principles (I've actually studied them for the same amount of time, but Tai Chi takes a lot longer to get good at) as well as a few bits and bobs of other things I've picked up over the years. I think that Wing Chun is a fairly complete system, but it does have its drawbacks. Like many martial arts, with my current skill I suspect its not very good at recovering from a bad situation, such as being on the floor. That's where things like Jitsu come into their own!

BTW, PVCFairy, despite being considerably smaller than me, has taken out my legs very easily during a Jitsu lesson. It's a good system. I suspect it's more suitable for smaller people, but grappling forms often will be.
artist.unknown
I mainly use TKD to work out, and because I like the psychological side: the philosophy behind martial arts, the poise it gives you, and the calming effect of controlled violence. I'm aware that I might handle myself more efficiently in a street fight than I would have were I not a black belt, but that's not what concerns me. TKD keeps me well in shape and sane.

I started taking Happkido classes (I DO want to learn other martial arts, especially Chinese ones). Like Mike, I don't seem to have many pressure points, and my joints bend in abnormal directions. I think that's pretty kickin', although unfortunately you can get a false sense of security because it doesn't FEEL like you're being hurt. After having to pop my own elbow back into place, I've been more cautious. Techniques like Happkido's where a person as small as me can chuck bears of men over their shoulder fascinate me. It's a heartening metaphor for life.
Mata
Chinese martial arts are very interesting. The way they twist energy through the body to release it in explosive movements is incredible. Some take more time to appreciate than others. Tai Chi gets all its strength from the internal use of energy, which is what makes it so difficult to learn well and so brilliant when a person is in control of it.

I went to another Wing Chun lesson last night. My instructor says that I have the best will to strike in the class. Apparently most people concentrate on the defense but I always combine my defensive moves with a strike, and he was rather impressed with that. He keeps on giving me direct small tips on my form, which I haven't heard him doing for other people, so I'm really flattered by that. It's really fun sparring with him, but my goodness he's fast, most of the time it's all I can do to deflect the blows!
PsychWardMike
Video games help with offense. laugh.gif Since you've been playing with less regard to the character's health bar than you would your own, one naturally becomes more inclined to attack.

At least that's what I've found to be true. I find it usually better to take out an attacker than defend and have the possibility of not being able to defend the next move.

Anyway... Mata's right about the multiple styles. While I am primarily grounded in Shotokan, a healthy mix of Tai Chi, Tae Kwon Do, Tang Soo Do, Kung Fu, and Ju Jitsu were all incorporated for balance.
Mata
I don't think that my gaming technique reflects my approach to martial arts. It certainly gives some interesting ideas for moves, but it doesn't change the way I approach a combat situation.

My willingness to strike comes from the way I was taught. Alan Gibson, my old Wing Chun teacher, has a very combat based style where the emphasis is on finishing a street fight as soon as humanly possible. My new teacher's style is slightly more based on defensive moves I think. He tells me that his first instructor emphasised sensitivity more than blows, leading to a very fluid style, but one that takes longer to get to practical martial results.
CommieBastard
Speaking as somebody who's tried moves from Shenmue in real life - videogames can help sometimes smile.gif

I've had a very little training in Wing Chun, which is both fun and effective. One I go to uni I'm going to start training again...
ravein
Wing Chun is a beautiful art to learn. Very fluid with little waste of movement. I am waiting to get into a Wing Chun dojo here but the person I wish to learn from only takes a few students at a time. This martial art is where the folk story started of the girl who would only marry a man who could beat her in battle.

What Commie said about being a black belt in Karate is correct. I took it for about 7 years and can say from experience that I was not very fluid or adaptable until my brown and black belt. However I did find that my dojo did not really practice the spiritual or meditative side of the art. By the time I actually got my black belt I was loosing my aspect. I had gotten to the point where if a door bumped against me I would react and turn to attack. Martial arts without an emphasis on the non-violent aspects of the art are a bad thing. When choosing a dojo you should study and question their students before you sign up to join. Make sure it is not a kill, kill culture. If so you will lose more than you will gain.

Also may I suggest Aikido, this art is truly an art. It uses the motion of your attacker against them. The moves are very sweeping and fluid. It is a very efficient martial art, using the concept of they push you pull and vice versa.
Mata
Aikido is probably the martial art I've had the most interest in learning but never got around to trying. I've also always got a good impression of it from the students, which is a good test of a form's virtue.
artist.unknown
I've always been interested in weapons styles too. (Like I said, I've always been more interested in the style and mentality of martial arts than practical application.) I've done nunchucka and bo. Does anyone here have experience with kendo or similar martial arts?
Erin
QUOTE (Mata @ Jul 14 2005, 04:03 AM)
Chinese martial arts are very interesting. The way they twist energy through the body to release it in explosive movements is incredible. Some take more time to appreciate than others. Tai Chi gets all its strength from the internal use of energy, which is what makes it so difficult to learn well and so brilliant when a person is in control of it.

I went to another Wing Chun lesson last night. My instructor says that I have the best will to strike in the class. Apparently most people concentrate on the defense but I always combine my defensive moves with a strike, and he was rather impressed with that. He keeps on giving me direct small tips on my form, which I haven't heard him doing for other people, so I'm really flattered by that. It's really fun sparring with him, but my goodness he's fast, most of the time it's all I can do to deflect the blows!
*



wow mata, thats good if your getting compliments i'd say.
smallcuteanddeadly
QUOTE (Erin @ Jul 12 2005, 09:45 PM)
QUOTE (smallcuteanddeadly @ Jul 12 2005, 12:43 PM)
QUOTE (pvcfairy @ Jul 12 2005, 07:20 PM)
I did jitsu for a while and if nothing else it gave me abit of confidence that if the situation arose I could get out of it, even if it was running away.
As for the biting pinching and scratching it was fun to get away with that on the mats ocasionally but I many stuck to toe or ear lob squezing, rib rubbing the odd bit of tickling those ones always had the suprise element to them...
*


Pressure points tongue.gif

Ahhh, I LOVED demonstrating pressure points... Very useful too. Good way of showing someone that size doesn't correlate (sp?) to how much pain can be inflicted.

Thank you all, you've just given me the kick up the bum I needed to get training again.
*



thats good i guess. tongue.gif biggrin.gif glad u could get back to it. congratulations.
*



Thanks smile.gif , went to a local Ju Jitsu class I'd heard much about on Wednesday. The teacher covers many weapons too, so I now have a lovely circular bruise on my wrists from Nunchakus and Tonfa... It was great being on the mat again. I never thought I'd miss it that much.

My legs and arse aren't half sore though...

What's happening with your classes Erin?

QUOTE (PsychWardMike @ Jul 12 2005, 10:52 PM)
Pfft.  I fear no pressure points!  laugh.gif

Actually, for part of my training, my sensei nullified all of my pressure points by demonstrating them... very often.  I have some deadened nerves in my pressure point areas now, but they don't work anymore.  Fair trade?
*


*mischievious grin* ever played with a Kubetan? Brings pressure points up to a whole new level biggrin.gif
*resolves to get those nerves working again for Mike. All for his own good of course. Maybe. tongue.gif

QUOTE (artist.unknown @ Jul 15 2005, 04:27 PM)
I've always been interested in weapons styles too. (Like I said, I've always been more interested in the style and mentality of martial arts than practical application.) I've done nunchucka and bo. Does anyone here have experience with kendo or similar martial arts?
*


Jodo (4ft. Japanese staff), basic Nunchakus, though the safest place to be when I have them is infront of me. Or did you mean sword art?

Aikido incorporates tanto (Knife), Katana/Bokken (Japanese sword) and Jo (4ft staff)

How did you get on with the Bo? I can't handle the buggers meself, I'm too short I think.
Erin
i havent started yet. i should be soon though..in maybe a week or so.
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