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Phyllis
It does? *re-reads* You mean the stuff you said about the mini-pill? Well, that works on the same principle (thickening the cervical mucus and causing the uterine lining to not thicken), but it doesn't say anything about the menstrual cycle completely ceasing, which is a pretty common side effect of the ones I was talking about.

And well, kisah is currently on a pill that stops her from having any menstruation. Cerzette. How does that possibly go against logic?

Depo isn't a pill, it's an injection, but...

QUOTE
Irregular, heavy, or no bleeding are common side effects of Depo Provera. After a year of use, many women stop having periods. Lack of a period becomes increasingly common with longer use.

from this site.

I can't find anything on Google that talks about Cerzette that is actually in English. But it's my understanding that it's similar to Depo Provera, just in pill form. I could be wrong, since I don't think we have it in the US (or, if we do, it's under a different name)
Mr Fuzzy
QUOTE (Mata @ May 7 2006, 07:02 PM) *
Out of interest, the pill that prevents periods: does this mean that you keep hold of your eggs so the menopause happens later in life?


Not really. One interesting thing about the gametes of conflicting genders is that sperm are produced fresh, so the genetic material they contain is new and shiny, but on the other side of the coin, an ovary contains all of them pre-made from the start. This means that they degrade over time. The eggs go off.

QUOTE (candice @ May 7 2006, 10:05 PM) *
I can't find anything on Google that talks about Cerzette that is actually in English. But it's my understanding that it's similar to Depo Provera, just in pill form. I could be wrong, since I don't think we have it in the US (or, if we do, it's under a different name)


Try Cerazette. That 'A' makes all the difference.
Phyllis
QUOTE (Mr Fuzzy @ May 7 2006, 04:51 PM) *
Try Cerazette. That 'A' makes all the difference.

AHA. No wonder. Well, in my defense, I copied and pasted what kisah wrote, and she's taking the stuff! tongue.gif

I definitely can't take it, though, according to the sites I found. So I will just sit here and be jealous of kisah and her lack of periods.
Cookieflair
Ok i am too chicken doodoo to try tampons so dont anticipate purchasing a mooncup anytime soon........

The above post was most definitely spam and i realize i have just put this topic on the recently posted list for unsuspecting faint hearted victims to fall into

MUHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

(I aim to please biggrin.gif )
kisah
QUOTE (candice @ May 7 2006, 07:33 PM) *
I'm not entirely certain how the stuff that stops your period works. It doesn't do that for all women. Some still have spotting once a month. An unlucky few start menstruating ALL THE TIME. I have a friend who had her period for...hmm...6-8 weeks straight when she tried Depo. Needless to say, she's not still on it.


I, myself, had a similar experience with Depo. Life was alright for three months, if you forget about the moody-me and the weight gain but then I started to have a period that lasted 8 - 10 weeks non-stop. Doc didn't seem too concerned but I didn't carry on.

QUOTE (candice @ May 7 2006, 09:11 PM) *
But we were talking about progesterone only methods, Daria. Like Depo Provera or Cerzette. Those usually stop the period from coming at all.


I take the cerazette mini pill because I am prone to migraines so I don't know if it's still a progesterone only method.
Mutilation
I think I'll give it a try... oh wait.

I've always been confused why woman can't just inject loads of progesterone around the time of the month to stop bleeding, instead of complaining about it dry.gif

Though I suppose you would get like, old uterus lining unsure.gif
Phyllis
QUOTE (Mutilation @ Jun 9 2006, 12:00 PM) *
I've always been confused why woman can't just inject loads of progesterone around the time of the month to stop bleeding, instead of complaining about it dry.gif

rolleyes.gif

You have a period and then tell me how willing you are to deal with a number of potential side effects in order to stop it. In fact, you can have mine for me. Then you can feel free to mess around with hormones and see where that gets you. Have fun with that.
{Gothic Angel}
*applauds cand* tongue.gif

Also: Waves of nausea, pain enough to make you cry and unable to move for extended periods of time, uncontrollable mood swings, sudden periods of being incredibly hungry, followed by sudden periods of feeling disgustingly bloated and greasy...

snoo and I described this to a male friend and he said it sounded like "being kicked in the bollocks after not having eaten for three days".

I realise it's not that bad for everyone but gods damnit, you guys can get through your wholes lives never being kicked in the bollocks! tongue.gif We can't avoid it *nods*

[/period rant]
FAIRYDUST
but how the heck do you get it out without making a mess, sounds quite fiddly to me
Cookieflair
oh the embarrasment if yoou spill it on your clothes.
You know if you went up side down on a rollercoaster would it feel weird?
FAIRYDUST
eeeeeeek thats not a nice thought. what if you were desperate for the toilet and really couldnt hold it in any longer
{Gothic Angel}
...It doesn't stop you using the toilet. It's no different from a tampon in that respect.
gothictheysay
Hey girls: YOU DON'T PEE AND BLEED FROM THE SAME SPOT DOWN THERE, YOU KNOW.

Well, I think most of you know.
{Gothic Angel}
Thankyou Sarah. I was trying to think of a nice way to say it tongue.gif
Aria
QUOTE (candice @ May 3 2006, 05:50 PM) *
Hmm...intriguing. I am terrified to try any type of hormonal birth control again. Well, I literally can't try ones like the pill or patch, but the doctor said that I could try stuff like Depo Provera. I'm just not certain I want to. It'd be awesome to not have a period, but my last experience with hormonal birth control was just so horrible that I'm a bit scared of all that stuff now...even the kind that doesn't have blood clots as a possible side effect, cause I'm afraid it'll make me moody or cause weight gain.

Oh well. The search for both the perfect contraception and the perfect menstrual product continues for me!


What about IUDs? There is the hormonal one, which is Mirena, but there's also a copper one, which isn't quite as effective, but is still not bad. I have Mirena, which is lovely. I had really wretched experiences with the pill and the patch, but so far (aside from the evil insertion cramps) it's been nice. No periods, too.
I_am_the_best
^ In school we were taught about a stick which you can get inserted into your arm and lasts for about 3 years and if you want a baby you can have it removed. Sounds pretty great to me.
Daria
It scares me- here ladies, have 5 years worth of hormones at once.
gothictheysay
Hmm, interesting. I think IUDs are no longer manufactured in the U.S. - but the book I have that info in is old, so maybe it's started again? I think you can still get one in the U.S., it might be slightly harder though.
Rykan
*come to add her two cents* I have Implanon, a little rod about the lenght of your little finger in your upper arm.
I think it's wonderful, but that's just because it works for me. One of the side effects is the same as the pill, hardly menstrating at all, it's wonderful <3 *cries with joy* plus it saves taking a pill at the same time everyday. I'd sometimes take it at the wrong times or forget completely, which made me super paranoid for days! This way is so much more convenient.
It doesn't hurt getting it implanted either! It was odd lying back on a table, having people bustling about above me, I felt like I was on ER laugh.gif

Anyone got any questions I can answer? biggrin.gif
Phyllis
QUOTE (I_am_the_best @ Jun 18 2006, 03:11 AM) *
^ In school we were taught about a stick which you can get inserted into your arm and lasts for about 3 years and if you want a baby you can have it removed. Sounds pretty great to me.

Norplant? Has the same side effects as the pill, doesn't it? My blood is stupid and can't handle that kind of thing. If I were to get pregnant and decide to remain that way, I'd have to inject myself daily with heparin or risk clotty death from the hormones generated by that as well.

As far as IUDs go...I'm a bit paranoid about ending up with a perforated uterus. unsure.gif When I went on the pill, the nurse was telling me about the side effects, and was saying "But you probably won't have to worry about any of that. It's pretty rare." Well, I did, as it turns out. Perforated uteruses may be rare...but that is one risk I am definitely not willing to take because by the time you realize what is wrong, it's usually too late to do anything for you. Death by contraception is not the way I want to go....
Teece
I've come across this forum trying to do a bit of research for my mooncup. I've only had it for a month, so this is the second time I've had the chance to try it out. Last month I used it just on my lighter days, and although I had to snip off most of the stem, thought that once it was in it was brilliant, but my problem is getting the blimmin thing up there in the first place. I have no trouble fannying (ahem) around downstairs, using applicator free tampons has become second nature, and my method of contraception requires me to be very observant and pretty hands on. What I'm finding is that my mooncup keeps popping open before I can get it in far enough, which at best is frustrating and at worst gets quite sore if I have to keep reinserting. Last night ended up with me sitting on the end of the bed in floods of tears, with my fella trying be sympathetic and not laugh at me for getting in such a tiz about such a silly thing. (Arguably its been a very challenging month, and the mooncup failures were a trigger for crying over bigger things). Still I'm going to keep trying. I remember having the same experience with tampons. I hated wearing pads, I desperately wanted to be able to use them with the ease and freedom other women did, but it took me a long time and lots of attempts to use them comfortably, and I really feel like my mooncup deserves the same perseverance.

The environmental issue is a big impetus for me, rather than the financial cost, as is the health issue. Despite some of the members misgivings about hygiene, I think that the mooncup is far more hygenic than tampons. When using tampons we really have no way of know what we put inside of ourselves, what chemicals where used in their manufacture that could be leaching into our bodies, where and how they are packaged, the effects of fibres staying inside us after we remove them. I remember once receiving an email about tampon brands using chemicals that actually increased bloodflow, so that we would have to go out and buy more of their product. I might not trust that my mooncup won't leak as I get used to it, but I certainly trust it and the women who manufacture and distribute it more than the big companies whose interests lie in profit margins and market leading.

I've known about the moon cup for several years, my first thoughts were urrgh - grim, and I immediately stereotyped the kind of women who would use it. But over the past year or so my curiousity grew, I did a bit of online research and noticed the overwhelming endorsement of it by women who use it. I mentioned it in passing to a couple of people and was surprised that even my mother had considered using one (she's not as she's now post menopause and has no need for one). In my ignorance, I didn't think she'd even knew what one was, let alone consider having one. It got to the point where I was buying tampons and thinking 'What am I doing?', 'Where's this money going?', and finally took the plunge.

Reading through this thread I noticed a lot of concern about the yuckiness of using a mooncup, and was interested both by my reactions to it last month and this 'urrgh gross' initial reaction that is very common. I can clearly remember my grandmother refering to menstruation as 'the curse', and it's association with the devil. We have been programmed for generations to believe that our mentrual cycles are 'gross', 'unclean' and 'taboo'. I have a tendancy to get on my high horse and relate all this to the notion of an 'Original Sin' being root for the repression of the feminine and therefore women, but in other religions and cultures menstration is also seen as 'unclean', and women are traditionally separated and excluded because they are on their period. Part of me thinks this isn't such a bad idea. Particularly on my first couple of days (which are invariably painful and heavy) I want to be on my own. I don't want to have to deal with people at work, or be in public generally, (and given my general mood at that time in my cycle, they probably don't want to have to deal with me), but it's ceratinly not because I feel like I'm dirty. I want to be warm, I want to feel safe, I want to feel comfortable, I want to be able to bleed in peace! But the flip side is that we have been lead to believe that something that is very natural, healthy and a necessary part of our fertility cycle isn't. Even now, I feel like I'm wrong because what my heart and body want during this time is at odds with what I think I should be doing, or how I think I should be coping as prescriped by countless advertisements and propaganda around sanitary products.

I digress slightly, but this sort of explains the surprising reaction to my first being confronted by a cup of my own menstrual blood. Having used tampons for years I really didn't think it would be an issue, but for me it was. I was used to it being soaked into a tampon, not seeing it as a liquid thing - it was fascinating, but also quite repulsive. I was also surprised to find that not only did it have a smell, but I also found that repelling. (Please note potential users, that it's only when I removed it that I noticed the smell, there's no odour when you wear one). I really really really wanted to be able to embrace my period, celebrate my blood, the internal cycle of fertility; of beginning and end, that inseparably linked me to the cycles of the earth and the universe. Yet there I was sitting on the loo looking into the mooncup and feeling decidedly discusted about it. Up came all the shame and revoltion with my own body that had me blushing at checkouts when I brought tampons in my teens and feeling embarrased about the palava of rifling through my bag at work to get a tampon out and get to the loo with it in case (god forbid!) anyone should notice. Jesus!

This time around isn't so bad, but my choice to switch to a mooncup has turned out to have bigger implications than just a change of sanitary product, or a cost effective environmental choice. I suspect that my reactions are a combination of biological reactions (I haven't conceived, by body is discarding something that is unwanted) and also this programming that periods are 'gross' and unclean. I'm interested in how I get on, whether the smell is something that I even notice this time around (strangely enough I haven't so far), and that despite all the initial reactions and problems, already by using it I feel freer in myself, I'm being more natural and more honest with my body. Embracing my period might take a while, learning how to get the flippin' thing inside without it popping open is going to take some practice, but in giving it a go, I'm certainly embracing what a gift it is to be a woman.

Therefore, all of you whose initial reaction was like mine "Urrrghh - yuck!', I urge you not to write it off completely. Just every now and then, pop on the website, take a look at it, familiarise yourself. It's only because it's such a different idea to the way we have dealt with periods that it seems so wierd and gross. It's taken me about five years to come around to the idea, but I'm very pleased that I have, and would certainly encourage anyone curious about it to have a go.
Teece
Me again.

This time is about the contraception discussion that has arisen in the thread, and wanted to talk about my form of contraception, simply because until 6 months ago I wasn't aware of its existance beyond a cross your fingers and hope you're okay method, which ain't exactly reliable.

I use NFP,or Natural Family Planning. I knew pretty much the moment I came across it that it was the method for me. I've had unpleasant experiences with the pill, seen women really suffer on account of hormonal injections and IUD's and question the impact synthetic hormones have both on my body and the environment. I toyed with the idea of a diaphragm, but when I discussed it with my partner, he thought it sounded like too much faffing about, and wondered why I'd have problems with hormone methods, but be happy to shove a load of spermicide chocka full of chemicals into such a delicate environment. Point taken.

You might already be familiar with it, but if not Natural Family Planning involves monitoring your fertility in a variety of ways, recording changes and avoiding (unprotected) intercourse when you are fertile.

It works on the following priciples:

A womans cervix produces noticable sperm friendly mucus prior to ovulation which changes in texture and quantity according to where you are in your fertility cycle.
The life span of an ovum or egg is a maximum 48 hours.
The lifespan of a (super*) sperm is 7 days in a sperm friendly enviroment.
The body's basal temperature changes after ovulation.
There are recordable changes within the position and feel of the cervix according to where we are in our fertility cycle.
72 hours after ovulation you are infertile. (ie - good to go)
Prior to ovulation (including during your period) you are relatively infertile. (ie not so good to go)

(* Most sperm have a lifespan of maximum 3-5 days.)

The method involves paying close attention to the changes in my body and recording this daily in a chart, and at it's most basic uses two methods to determine the fertile period - the basal temperature and cervical mucus.

Basal Temperature:

The basal temperature is recorded each morning on waking, before getting out of bed. For accuracy this has to be at the same time every morning (although of course there are occasions where this isn't possible, and it's amazing what a difference and hour or so can make to the body temperature). The basal temperature is noticably higher (.2 degrees or so) after ovulation, and your infertile stage is taken to be from the third high temperature over six low temperatures after peak mucus day....

Peak mucus day:
This is determined by close attention to your cervical mucus, either by having a quick feel of your cervix or just keeping an eye on your discharge. When we are infertile, the cervix does not produce mucus, however in response to the hormonal changes in our body it starts to produce mucus as we near ovulation. At first it's sticky, white and thick, but still capable of helping little spermatoza up into the cervix (which is after all it's function). Nearing ovulation it gets thinner, stretchier, and clearer, and even more effective at helping sperm achieve impregnation. This peaks and drops off fairly quickly (for me I build up over 7 or eight days and then drop off over about three). We are deemed infertile when we are dry, as the vaginal canal becomes decidedly unfriendly to sperm once theres no chance of an egg being fertilised during it's lifespan.

It's also possible to note changes in the position of the cervix and the feel of it - this is definitely the more 'hands on' part of the method and takes a lot of getting used to. Typically the cervix sits at a tilt low in the vaginal canal and is hard and closed, but approaching ovulation it straightens up and softens up to facilitate conception. With this I've found that although I can tell changes in the tilt of my cervix, it's nigh impossible to notice any change in the feel of it, and so don't rely on it to determine my fertile period. However I'm pretty fortunate in that I can feel when I ovulate (I get mittelschmerz or 'middle pain') and usually spot bleed just after, so I have another determining method to hand.

Might sound like hard work, and of course Natural family planning isn't for everyone. It's take a certain level of commitment to it, and definitely co-operation from your partner, especially since you are inevitably at your horniest precisely when you should either be avoiding sex or using another form of contraception. It's 98% effective when used properly, but theres not the margin for error as there is with taking a pill for example - miss a day and you're pretty much covered, get this wrong, and you will very possibily get pregnant, so you have to at least have some idea of what you would do in that eventuality

Still, the benefits are great. Once you get into the routine it gets easier, and all in all, takes up about 5 minutes of my day. Thats all. You get to learn so much more about your body and your fertility, and rather than delegating responsibilty to a pill or implant, you take direct control of it. I use condoms during the first half of my cycle and for the fertile days after ovulation, and even though it can be a bit of a drag, the period where my partner and I can forego them with confidence more than makes up for it. Where necessary, the method calculated to longest possible lifespan of sperm and ovum. The 72 hour window allows for the release of two eggs, and assumes they will live the longest time possible, and so you always play it safe if you stick to the method. It is amazinghow my body conspires to conceive, the changes it goes through and the changes I go through emotionally as a result. (My sex drive definitely drops off once I'm in my infertile stage).

If you are interested, there is plenty of information on the internet. I asked the family planning clinic about it and they have a fertility nurse who teaches the method to you over six months, This has been incredably useful in ironing out misunderstandings and potential mistakes that could lead to me getting it wrong, and making sure I've got the hang of keeping charts before using it as a contraceptive method.

Teece x
{Gothic Angel}
QUOTE
I remember once receiving an email about tampon brands using chemicals that actually increased bloodflow, so that we would have to go out and buy more of their product.


To be honest, I would be inclined to just write that off as scare tactics in much the same way as you'll be "cursed" if you don't forward a chain email. That is very definately illegal, at least in the sense that they would be obliged to warn the consumer that the product may cause an increase in bleeding, and list the harmful chemical (which no UK brand of tampons does, so far as I know, having looked into it after it came up once before in this thread). If there was any indication of this being a real issue, the company responsible would almost certainly have been investigated.

QUOTE
We have been programmed for generations to believe that our mentrual cycles are 'gross', 'unclean' and 'taboo'. I have a tendancy to get on my high horse and relate all this to the notion of an 'Original Sin' being root for the repression of the feminine and therefore women, but in other religions and cultures menstration is also seen as 'unclean', and women are traditionally separated and excluded because they are on their period. Part of me thinks this isn't such a bad idea. Particularly on my first couple of days (which are invariably painful and heavy) I want to be on my own.


Something I have often thought myself, but then, they are pretty disgusting to deal with (see quote below). They are also unhygenic, in the sense that any dead cellular matter is a biohazard if not dealt with and disposed of sensibly - in historic cultures, in which a lot of religions (Specifically, orthadox Judaism) began and have their roots, there would have been no way to dispose of menses hygenically, so in a sense, the women really were "unclean". In a close community, disease would have been a major issue back then. It's also worth noting the you were considered unclean until sunset if you had had sex, masturbated, or been to the toilet during the day, so pretty much everyone was unclean some of the time tongue.gif

QUOTE
I was used to it being soaked into a tampon, not seeing it as a liquid thing - it was fascinating, but also quite repulsive.


I don't consider that tantamount to not accepting my femininity and my body. You use deoderant, presumably? tongue.gif It's waste, it's not something which is needed or productive to my body, therefore, I don't feel the need to see it as anything other than another form of homeostasis - my body doing what it needs to keep itsself balanced and alive. I certainly don't consider it a "gift" - I would consider it a gift to be able to bear a child, but beyond that, my feelings towards it are entirely neutral. And dysmenorrhea is most certainly not something I feel the need to be grateful for.

I'm happy to be female, but I find it odd that many women seem to want to rejoice in their own gender, given they have no idea what it's like to be male, and that we do it by celebrating something which is entirely arbitrary and out of our control anyway - I don't see any men "embracing their masculinity" by celebrating every time they have a wet dream. Not that I'm devaluing the happiness or whatever that women gain from it - I just find it odd smile.gif
Phyllis
QUOTE (Teece @ Aug 18 2006, 10:03 AM) *
until 6 months ago I wasn't aware of its existance beyond a cross your fingers and hope you're okay method, which ain't exactly reliable.

Where the heck are you from? How could you possibly not be aware of the existance of birth control? huh.gif Don't they teach kids sex ed anymore? *gets cane*

QUOTE (Teece @ Aug 18 2006, 10:03 AM) *
I use NFP,or Natural Family Planning.

There's a term for people who use NFP.

Parents.
{Gothic Angel}
*points at what cand says*

That was why I avoided talking about the birth control thing tongue.gif When I say stuff like that, people take offence.
Faerieryn
QUOTE (candice @ May 3 2006, 06:50 PM) *
QUOTE (kisah @ May 3 2006, 05:05 AM) *

I've taken the Cerzette route myself. Period free and that pretty much kicks any other option's butt.

Hmm...intriguing. I am terrified to try any type of hormonal birth control again. Well, I literally can't try ones like the pill or patch, but the doctor said that I could try stuff like Depo Provera. I'm just not certain I want to. It'd be awesome to not have a period, but my last experience with hormonal birth control was just so horrible that I'm a bit scared of all that stuff now...even the kind that doesn't have blood clots as a possible side effect, cause I'm afraid it'll make me moody or cause weight gain.

Oh well. The search for both the perfect contraception and the perfect menstrual product continues for me!



OK I have difficulties with certain types of Pill. As you all know (because I go on and on about it) I suffer from focal migraines (the ones that appear to be like mini strokes) consequentially I can't take any form of combined pill as they are associated with thrombosis. Whn I was 17 I went to the FPC and was given Depo provera. Aside from a month of hormonal migraines I had no problems. I was warned that my period from immediately after the jab may go on for up to three months!!! but after that they would subside. For six years I was a happy no period bunny. I occasionally bled which was a real bugger at times as I had no warning as to when it would happen (yes boyfriend's mum I had a nose bleed!!!) and when there was a shortage one Christmas I had real difficulties using a couple of nasty condoms and had to use the morning after pill twice in two weeks!!! But aside from that I was fine.

Then I returned to my home town and went to get jabbed again. I was told that there was a slight correlation between extended use of depo and brittle bone disease. So they suggested I had an implant put in. That was two years ago and I am a less happy bunny mainly because of the irregular periods it causes me but still am reasonably chipper.

Of the two types of contraception the implant is less likely to cause problems as the hormone is released over time rather than a bumper supply of three months worth at once, hence the more likely to have periods. It has less side effects and inteferes with your life less. I am concerned about how they'll get it out when the three years are up though!!!

On the Mooncup

As I have very low flow I probably wouldn't bother with one of these, however I have never been able to use applicator free tampons so would doubtless have difficulties with this. Anyone got any experience?

What's an O.B?
LoLo
QUOTE (Faerieryn @ Aug 21 2006, 07:23 AM) *
As I have very low flow I probably wouldn't bother with one of these, however I have never been able to use applicator free tampons so would doubtless have difficulties with this. Anyone got any experience?

What's an O.B?

An O.B. is a brand of tampons in the states that is applicator free. Applicator free tampons are actually quite easy to use and I much perfer them over tampons with applicators. Pretty much all you have to do is use the string at the bottom to fan out the tampon a bit, then stick your finger into that area and push the little sucker up. Some people find that gross, but you don't have a messy bloody applicator to throw away, it's just washing your hands for clean up, and you can hide them in the palm of your hand on the way to the restroom if you're the type of person to get embarrassed about grabbing a tampon.
{Gothic Angel}
QUOTE
Applicator free tampons are actually quite easy to use and I much perfer them over tampons with applicators.


Same. They're just so much easier, and plus I have a deeply rooted aversion to putting anything made of non flexible plastic up there because of just the way it happens to be shaped means that personally, I find it painful cos they catch. So bearing that in mind: Ryn, the mooncup was actually pretty easy to use and comfortable. Just a tad larger than I was really comfortable with.
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