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pgrmdave
Okay, I'll try:

Loughborough = low - bur - ro
Gloucestershire = gloss - ter - shy - er
leicestershire = ly - ster - shy - er
Cirencester = Seer - en - ster
Worcester = Woo - ster (at least that's how they pronounce it in Massachusetts, but the first time I ever saw it, I would have pronounced it Wars - ster)
Daria
QUOTE (candice @ Nov 8 2005, 08:02 PM)
But Dave, have you tried saying the British place names I listed?  Come on, amuse me!  Dance, monkey, dance!

Ahem.  biggrin.gif

So, to answer your question, Daria...most of us could probably tell if someone was from the South, Northeast, Midwest, or West...but unless we were from the actual region it'd be hard to be more specific than that.  And if we're from the West....it'd be really hard to be very specific at all (though I can generally tell right away if someone is from California originally and has just moved up to Oregon).  The "West" is literally almost the size of HALF of America.  The "Midwest" is further East than West, which I never understood.

And an NYC accent may not be what you think it is.  wink.gif  Almost every borough of NYC has a different accent...or at least it seemed that way to me.  What people think of as a stereotypical NYC accent is really a Brooklyn accent.  Most people in Manhattan speak close to the way I speak, unless you get into areas like Harlem.
*

I see biggrin.gif
I suppose an English person could obviously tell if a person was Scottish, Irish or Welsh, but not perhaps tell from which part the person was from.

I would love to learn more about where the American accent came from, seeing as there were alot of settlers from where I live (East Anglia- hence the Norfolk and Suffolk in the USA) as with other rural parts. Is it possible to track such a thing?
Moosh
QUOTE (pgrmdave @ Nov 8 2005, 07:14 PM)
Okay, I'll try:

Loughborough = low - bur - ro
Gloucestershire = gloss - ter - shy - er
leicestershire = ly - ster - shy - er
Cirencester = Seer - en - ster
Worcester = Woo - ster (at least that's how they pronounce it in Massachusetts, but the first time I ever saw it, I would have pronounced it Wars - ster)
*


Hehehe

I am now laughting at you, but I'm not going to correct you until at least a few more Americans have had a go.
Mata
I got two on that quiz, but was also very close on most of them. I was a bit confused because there were accents that I thought 'ah that comes from x' but the map lumps together the deep south and the east coast which made it rather tricky to guess where things should go.

As for regions around the UK, I can usually tell the difference between a Glaswegian and an Edinburgh accent, one from Northern Ireland and one from other parts of Ireland, and quite a few cities are fairly distinctive. I can do this despite never having been to Glasgow or anywhere in Ireland (although I couldn't be much more specific than that about Ireland: I know what sounds different, but couldn't tell you where they're from). Many areas of London have enough variation that I suspect that anyone could tell the difference even if they didn't speak any English!
Phyllis
QUOTE (CheeseMoose @ Nov 8 2005, 11:26 AM)
Hehehe

I am now laughting at you, but I'm not going to correct you until at least a few more Americans have had a go.
*

I've seen worse! Like...ahem...myself.... wink.gif

And one women I heard about who said Loughborough as looga-barooga.... biggrin.gif

I always giggle when I hear Brits say "Los Angeles" as well. There are a few others that amused me, but I can't remember them off the top of my head. I will have to get out a map and force moop to say things again. evil.gif

Accents are funny things...

And it's probably possible to track such a thing, Daria, but it'd take more time and research than I'm willing to put into it...hehe.
Daria
QUOTE (candice @ Nov 8 2005, 09:00 PM)
And it's probably possible to track such a thing, Daria, but it'd take more time and research than I'm willing to put into it...hehe.
*


Ditto biggrin.gif
Why is it funny how we say Los Angeles? I say it "loz an-jellies" but that could just be me...
pgrmdave
I tend to say LA...or 'Loss An-gell-iss", with the accent on 'An'
elphaba2
QUOTE (Daria @ Nov 8 2005, 01:17 PM)
Why doesn't America have as many different accents as in Britain? I mean, there are some obvious different ones- the Texan drawl, a New Yorker's accent, a Chicago accent, Californian (ok, forgive me for thinking of Valley Girl by Frank Zappa here biggrin.gif) accent.

But are they really that obvious? Would an American beable to listen to a person talk and say "you come from [insert place name here]" as most British people would beable to do?
*


Oh, I think we do. New York, for example: if you wander away from the city it's got even more accents. Upstaters in the Binghamton-Ithaca area have a peculiar clipped sort of tone and a funny way of saying "to eat"--they put lots of emphasis on the "t"s and sort of blur the words, so it come out "tweet". Well-off Westchester girls have a weird way of hissing their "t"s, and sound kind of Valley-girl like. Syracuse has a hilariously flat pronunciation of the letter "a" (like Boston!), and Albany has a similar nasality, but without the flat "a"s and more of a "hurr-burr" general tone. Far upstate (Buffalo area) people sound like they're from the Michigan/Wisconsin area, sometimes. I'm swell at NY accents, because I live there, but I am teh suxxorz at determining the difference between, say, Oregon and Minnesota. Or Kansas, for that matter.
Moosh
QUOTE (candice @ Nov 8 2005, 08:00 PM)
QUOTE (CheeseMoose @ Nov 8 2005, 11:26 AM)
Hehehe

I am now laughting at you, but I'm not going to correct you until at least a few more Americans have had a go.
*

And one women I heard about who said Loughborough as looga-barooga.... biggrin.gif

I always giggle when I hear Brits say "Los Angeles" as well.
*



My cousin says looga-barooga, but then again she lives there so she has the right to define how it is pronounced.

How are you meant to say Los Angeles? I say Loss An-gell-ees
Phyllis
Most Americans pronounce Los Angeles the same way as pgrmdave. The end is pronounced issss, not eees. Hmm, maybe it's not so much an i sound as an e sound. Like essssss.

I started giggling the first time I heard the eeees way of saying it, and wondering where on earth they got that pronounciation from.
Moosh
The ees ending probably comes from the fact it sounds Spanish, and we jsut think it must be pronounced like that if it is SApanish. I'm not saying that it's right but it's the way I thought.

Of course the real name of the city is El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles del Río de Porciúncula. Which definatly is not pronounced Loss An-gell-iss
Phyllis
The Spanish way of saying it would be closer to ess than eees...at least to my ears.

L-oh-s Ahn-hell-ehs.

Though I'm not about to go through pronouncing the rest of that. tongue.gif

(Wow, this thread isn't even sort of about what the UK is like anymore, is it? We've gone to discussing accents. Oh well, I think FMA has vacated the thread anyway)
Moosh
Damn my limited access to Spaniards!

Okay then, we have no justification whatsoever for saying ees. But it still sounds better. Obviously.
Phyllis
Pssh no. It sounds silly. tongue.gif

I dunno...I think the correct way to pronounce the name of a place is the way that people who actually live there say it.

But maybe that's due to a lifetime of people saying "or-ee-gone" at me. It just sounds so wrong! "Or-ih-gun." Do you Americans who are East of the Rockies hear me? "Or-ih-gun!"

*cough*

That's one all the Brits I met got correct, anyway. No one ever said "or-ee-gone" to me there. Though I'll never ever get used to being called Canned-eese..... wink.gif
pgrmdave
QUOTE (Candice)
I think the correct way to pronounce the name of a place is the way that people who actually live there say it.


See! I told you it was Nork!!! (sorry, my friends tell me I pronounce it wrong, even though I grew up near there, and everybody called it nork, not 'new-ark')

QUOTE (Candice)
Do you Americans who are East of the Rockies hear me? "Or-ih-gun!"


That's how I always pronounced it, well, almost. I say "Or - ih - gin"
Daria
Another place name I think you should all (including Brits) should have a go at saying.

Whymondam.

biggrin.gif

And on the North Norfolk coast, the accent is so thick that the locals call the place Stiffkey (stiff-key) stoo-key, with a little bit of a grunt in the middle.
Moosh
QUOTE (candice @ Nov 8 2005, 10:02 PM)
Pssh no.  It sounds silly.  tongue.gif

I dunno...I think the correct way to pronounce the name of a place is the way that people who actually live there say it. 

But maybe that's due to a lifetime of people saying "or-ee-gone" at me.  It just sounds so wrong!  "Or-ih-gun."  Do you Americans who are East of the Rockies hear me?  "Or-ih-gun!" 

*cough*

That's one all the Brits I met got correct, anyway.  No one ever said "or-ee-gone" to me there.  Though I'll never ever get used to being called Canned-eese.....  wink.gif
*


Er... I pronounce it Or-eh-gun. And I would also call you cand-eese. I'll go now.
Moosh
QUOTE (Daria @ Nov 8 2005, 10:07 PM)
Another place name I think you should all (including Brits) should have a go at saying.

Whymondam.
*


Wind-am?
Phyllis
QUOTE (Daria @ Nov 8 2005, 02:07 PM)
Another place name I think you should all (including Brits) should have a go at saying.

Whymondam.
*

Wind-um, I think...? I may be cheating though, since I remember talking about place names in IRC ages ago and Novander brought that one up....if it's the correct one.

And Dave, that pronounciation of Oregon is also acceptable. I've found it's about 50/50 whenever I'm East of the Rockies between people saying it properly and people saying "Or-ee-gone." CM...that's....close enough to how Oregon is said. And I just tell Brits to call me Cand anyway...tis easier than explaining that it's said "Cand-iss," cause most find that hard to get used to wink.gif

And hehe! Nork! I am saying it that way from now on...I'd never heard that. I like the word Nork though...Nork Nork Nork.....
Daria
Wow, I am surprised at you guys getting the Whymondham one. Took me a while, and I live near there. dry.gif
pgrmdave
I think, though I have absolutly no facts backing me up, that the reason that Newark, NJ is pronounced 'nork' and not 'newark' stems from the fact that the inhabitants of New Jersey routinely slur words togeather and Newark's close proximity to New York City, which is referred to as simply 'New York'. When slurred, 'New York' becomes 'ne-yerk' which sounds very similar to 'ne-wark' so to make things simpler, over the years 'ne-wark' became 'newrk' which became 'nork'.
Phyllis
Some fun Oregon place names for you all to try:

Umatilla
Molalla
Champoeg
Tillamook
La Grande (deceptively simple! Almost everyone gets this one wrong)

None of them are overly hard...except maybe Champoeg, which is a park...not a town. They are the ones that tend to get said strangely by people from elsewhere though.


Also, Dave is the only American brave enough to try the British ones? tongue.gif
vicrawr
QUOTE (candice @ Nov 8 2005, 01:19 PM)
Do you speak American quiz.  I did horribly...only 1/20.  And I didn't even get my OWN accent correct.  The differences are often subtle (especially in the West), but they're gradually becoming more pronounced.  Though I was pretty close with all of them.
*


Ha! 4/20! Pwned! I would like to add that I got the southern accents perfectly. Go me!

QUOTE (pgrmdave @ Nov 8 2005, 02:14 PM)
Okay, I'll try:

Loughborough = low - bur - ro
Gloucestershire = gloss - ter - shy - er
leicestershire = ly - ster - shy - er
Cirencester = Seer - en - ster
Worcester = Woo - ster (at least that's how they pronounce it in Massachusetts, but the first time I ever saw it, I would have pronounced it Wars - ster)
*


Loughborough = luff-brow
Gloucestershire = glow-ches-ter-shire
Leicestershire = lay-ches-ter-shire
Cirencester = Si-ren-ches-ter
Worcester = Wuss-ter
Astarael
It's or-ig-gun for me. The other way just sounds ridiculous. And I pronounce Los Angeles Loss an-gel-ess. I'm not going to attempt the British ones, and I think the answers are up, though I'm not sure. tongue.gif I would pronounce Candice can-diss. I'm not quite sure why, but it sounds nice.
I took the quiz and got 3/20. I nailed the southern accents since that's where I live. The key to identifying Southern accents is noticing the broadened vowels, I think.
vicrawr
QUOTE (Astarael @ Nov 8 2005, 08:15 PM)
It's or-ig-gun for me. The other way just sounds ridiculous. And I pronounce Los Angeles Loss an-gel-ess. I'm not going to attempt the British ones, and I think the answers are up, though I'm not sure.  tongue.gif I would pronounce Candice can-diss. I'm not quite sure why, but it sounds nice.
I took the quiz and got 3/20. I nailed the southern accents since that's where I live. The key to identifying Southern accents is noticing the broadened vowels, I think.
*


It really is. We talk like we walk. Real slow. At least, I do. But back to the U.K.!

How d'you react to americans over there? I remember when an airman came over with his scottish wife and children, I had class with his oldest son. I'd sit there and listen to him talk over and over again. Do you regard accents different from your own with some sort of awe and curiosity? Or is that just me?
Usurper MrTeapot
QUOTE (IrishGuy @ Nov 9 2005, 01:31 AM)
How d'you react to americans over there?
*


We hide our wmd's, run into our bunkers and hope we didn't leave the oven on.
CommieBastard
QUOTE (IrishGuy @ Nov 8 2005, 11:02 PM)
Gloucestershire = glow-ches-ter-shire
Leicestershire = lay-ches-ter-shire
*


*giggle*
Phyllis
QUOTE (MrTeapot @ Nov 8 2005, 06:14 PM)
We hide our wmd's, run into our bunkers and hope we didn't leave the oven on.
*

You mean...you had WMD's and you hid them from me?! *sniffle* I'm hurt, really.

tongue.gif

People generally just asked me questions about how the UK compared and stuff when I was there...and talked about differences they'd noticed if they'd been to the US themselves. Teapot asked me if I called my dad "Pop"....hehe. There was none of that "OMG I LOVE YOUR ACCENT" sort of thing. Of course, my accent is pretty boring and generic. I imagine someone who was Southern or from Boston or something would get people pestering them a lot more to say things. tongue.gif
Sir Psycho Sexy
QUOTE (candice @ Nov 8 2005, 10:34 PM)
Some fun Oregon place names for you all to try:

Umatilla
Molalla
Champoeg
Tillamook
La Grande (deceptively simple!  Almost everyone gets this one wrong)
*


*ahem*

Umatilla - Oo-ma-till-a
Molalla - Mol-a-lla
Champoeg - Sham-peg? Sham-poyg? ....stop making words up Cand
Tillamook - Till-a-mook
La Grande - If it's a silent e it would be 'La Grand', if not, then e on the end could be accented (é), in which case I'd say it's 'La Grand-ey'.
Daria
Loughborough = luff-bruh
Gloucestershire = gloss-ster-shear
Leicestershire = less-ter-shear
Cirencester = Si-ren-sess-ter
Worcester = Wuss-ter

Umatilla - yoo-ma-til-a?
Molalla - Mol-a-la? Or moy-a-la
Champoeg - sham-pweg?
Tillamook - Till-a-mook
La Grande - La grund (if you pronounce it properly according to the rules of French)
huh.gif
Moosh
QUOTE (Daria @ Nov 9 2005, 06:05 PM)
Loughborough = luff-bruh
*


Loughborough - Luff-burr-urr
The other ones I agree with

Umatilla - oo-mat-illa
Molalla - Mol-al-a
Champoeg - Sham-poh
Tillamook - Till-a-moo
La Grande - La Grand-e
Phyllis
hehehehe

Umatilla = You-muh-till-uh

Molalla = Muh-lah-lah. Never moe, always muh.

Champoeg = sham-poo-ehy. It's kind of hard to type out the pronounciation of the last syllable through text. It's kind of a cross between eh and ey. And I didn't make it up, Pat tongue.gif

Tillamook = tih-lah-mook...the mook bit rhymes with look, not luke.

La Grande = Lah Gr-and. Almost a nasal kind of a on Grande...if you're actually from the area, almost like saying grand in a Midwestern accent, which is strange. Anyway, the most common mistake with that one is saying it grahnd-ey, thinking it's Spanish. Daria's the first person I've seen (and I've lived near there for nearly 10 years) correctly identify it as French. But we still don't say it that way. biggrin.gif

I wouldn't say the endings on the British ones as shear, I'd say it as shur. And I'd say Loughborough the way Daria wrote it. Funnily enough the one that took me the longest to say properly was Worcester. I couldn't get my head around there not being an R sound in the middle there somewhere. I kept trying to say worse-ster...which just sounded wrong. I still think Wor-chester when I see it written out. I pronounce them all wrong in my head when I'm typing them so I can think of how they're spelled. biggrin.gif
Moosh
QUOTE (candice @ Nov 9 2005, 07:27 PM)
I wouldn't say the endings on the British ones as shear, I'd say it as shur.  And I'd say Loughborough the way Daria wrote it.
*


I actually say it shur too. And only lazy people say Luff-bruh, 'cos bruh is just burr-urr said fast.
MrRandomQuotes
Is it just me or do most americans speak painfully slowly?

I went over there in the summer for 2 weeks and everyone there complained i talked fast, and by the time i got back everyone here was saying that i was talking slowly :/

And anyone know why so many americans go "OMG I LOVE YOUR ACCENT"?? Its scary.

Anyone want to pronounce oregano?
pgrmdave
What part of America did you travel to? The NYC area talks rather quickly, while the midwest and the south talk painfully slowly...they do everything slower down there.
LoLo
QUOTE (MrRandomQuotes @ Nov 9 2005, 03:00 PM)
And anyone know why so many americans go "OMG I LOVE YOUR ACCENT"?? Its scary.

*


Because we have a strange fascination with accents. If you're from another country it doesn't matter what you look like, you'll have no problem what so ever getting laid. Well most other countries that is. I don't think many people find the accent from India drool worthy here.
Phyllis
QUOTE (MrRandomQuotes @ Nov 9 2005, 03:00 PM)
Anyone want to pronounce oregano?
*

Sure. or-EH-guh-no. I will always say it that way...just as the a in tomato will always sound like the a in ate rather than the a in all when I speak.

I am well aware that the British pronounciation is or-uh-GAH-no, but neither is incorrect. tongue.gif The syllables that are stressed in each accent are in caps.

As for the accent fascination thing...we don't get many variations over here. As people mentioned earlier, we are lacking in seriously distinct regional dialects (we have a few, but nowhere NEAR the amount England has). And then there's the fact that Canadians tend to sound a lot like us, and an American ear can't usually pick up any regional variations in a Mexican accent. They're our only neighbors...anyone else has to come quite far to get here. So it's quite a novel thing to hear someone who speaks differently.
trunks_girl26
QUOTE (MrRandomQuotes @ Nov 9 2005, 11:00 PM)
And anyone know why so many americans go "OMG I LOVE YOUR ACCENT"?? Its scary.

Anyone want to pronounce oregano?
*


Because foreign = different = hawt.

Also:

American: O-reg-en-o (emphasis on the reg)

English: Or-re-gah-no (emphasis on the gah)
Usurper MrTeapot
QUOTE (trunks_girl26 @ Nov 10 2005, 01:59 AM)
Also:

American: O-reg-en-o (emphasis on the reg)

English: Or-re-gah-no (emphasis on the gah)
*


I always say O-rey-gan-o. Which seems to be a cross of the two, transatlantic style.
Usurper MrTeapot
A question about the USA, if I went over there and walked into a pub. What measurements would they give me my beer in? Ignoring the fact that I'm not 21.

You don't serve it in half litres do you?
vicrawr
QUOTE (MrTeapot @ Nov 11 2005, 09:04 AM)
A question about the USA, if I went over there and walked into a pub. What measurements would they give me my beer in? Ignoring the fact that I'm not 21.

You don't serve it in half litres do you?
*


Well, you'd walk into a bar, not a pub. Unless the bar's name had the word 'pub' in it. And you'd just ask for a beer. You could get it in a bottle or a glass. And by name brand. I think. I'm under 21 as well and have never ordered alcohol in a bar before.
Daria
France uses the metric system as well, and they sell their beers (draught) by the 500 cl.

If you look on a British bottle of beer which would have once come in a pint bottle, it now comes in 500 cl.
Sad times people, sad times.
Phyllis
QUOTE (IrishGuy @ Nov 11 2005, 08:45 AM)
You could get it in a bottle or a glass. And by name brand. I think. I'm under 21 as well and have never ordered alcohol in a bar before.
*

Yeah. I'm pretty sure the glasses of beer are smaller than a pint here. Pretty much the equivalent of what you'd get in a bottle, only poured from the tap thingy thing, I think?

And Vic's right that you really wouldn't find many pubs at all here. There's one in my town...sort of. Only, it's not really very pubby, more restauranty. It has pub in the name, but that's about it.
Usurper MrTeapot
Pub, bar, whats the difference?

Ok what about times for drinking, when going to Israel I thought it really odd that pubs don't open till late afternoon where we open at 11am most days and close around 11:30pm. When do US 'bars' open and shut? Are they pretty much depending on the bar or is there a general time that you'd expect to be in one.

Hmm, *tries to think of other american drink related subjects*.
Daria
QUOTE (MrTeapot @ Nov 11 2005, 07:12 PM)
Pub, bar, whats the difference?

Ok what about times for drinking, when going to Israel I thought it really odd that pubs don't open till late afternoon where we open at 11am most days and close around 11:30pm. When do US 'bars' open and shut? Are they pretty much depending on the bar or is there a general time that you'd expect to be in one.

Hmm, *tries to think of other american drink related subjects*.
*



Why is most of your exported beer like a very weak shandy?

tongue.gif
Only joking biggrin.gif

What IS the difference between a pub and a bar? I was going to say you can stay at a pub (public house) but then I realised that was an Inn, and pubs don't have accomodation...

Hmmm.
Phyllis
I'm fairly certain that in the US, only pubs serve food. Mind you, I've not been to many bars (only two...been to far more pubs)...so I could be very wrong.

They generally don't have nearly as many tables as a pub would. Sports bars are kind of similar to pubs, I suppose. I think they serve food? We'd be more likely to call a pubby type place a tavern, I think...???

And all of our exported beer tastes like crap because we only export the yucky mass manufactured stuff. There are a lot of...what're they called?...microbreweries? that make small amounts of decent beer spread all over the place. There's one in my town (made by the same people who own the pub, actually). Those places make beer on a really small scale, so there's only really enough for local areas. Kinda similar to our chocolate in that much of the mass manufactured stuff tastes like wax, but if you find a local place that makes it themselves... wub.gif

Oh, pubs in the UK also sometimes have beer gardens. That'd be pretty hard to find in the US, I think. Maybe it depends on state laws...some are stricter than others. I had never even heard the UK definition of a beer garden before I went there. In my town, a "beer garden" is this annual thing at the park where they have a big thing set up with a bunch of different microbrewery beers. You pay $5 to get in or something, and then you can "sample" all the beer you want. This basically results in a park full of drunken people. Ahh, traditions...

Someone who is underaged can never enter a bar in the US without their parent or guardian. A pub can depend on the place...kids can enter my local one and eat there. Though, I still think the only thing pubby about that one is the name...

When bars are open depend on the bar. Sports bars open rather early...probably around lunchtime. Others probably not until late afternoon? I have no idea.

I have probably gotten some of this wrong. It's just based on my rather limited experience with such things. tongue.gif
Usurper MrTeapot
What about last orders?
Phyllis
Generally 2 or 3 AM, from the one's I've been to.
Mata
In the UK, if you go into a pub and it has no tables then just pretend that you were looking for someone and leave. Those are often the establishments of serious drinkers where furniture is valued more for its ballistic potential than it's convenience. Why have tables if you never intend to let go of your glass until it's finished? They generally also have a small television very high up in a corner so that people have an excuse to not slow their drinking with talk.

That kind of pub is pretty rare but they do exist. Sues and I ran into one in Southend during a sudden massive rainstorm. We decided pretty quickly to brave the weather instead of staying in there.
Daria
Just a quandary- does the US get exported all our crap beers? As there are lots and lots of fantastic local breweries (ie St Peters, Adnams- just to name two local ones) in Britain, do you get some of the "good stuff" too?

biggrin.gif Mata's description of the pub is quite like one of the three in a village a couple of miles away. Full of regulars who sit there from opening to closing, always in the same seats, always in the same flat caps. And God help anyone who should sit in their seat, or try talking to them!
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