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Spacehappy
QUOTE (Sir_Psycho_Sexy @ Nov 1 2005, 01:43 AM)
Edit: But now I think about it, Caerdydd is quite a nice place really, good night life.
*


Too damn right. and it's got me wink.gif
Astarael
All my knowledge of the UK stems from what I know from people here, history class, and fantasy novels set in some part of the UK timeline. Someday when I'm feeling motivated I might bother to do more reserach.
Sir Psycho Sexy
QUOTE (Spacehappy @ Nov 3 2005, 01:46 PM)
QUOTE (Sir_Psycho_Sexy @ Nov 1 2005, 01:43 AM)

Edit: But now I think about it, Caerdydd is quite a nice place really, good night life.
*


Too damn right. and it's got me wink.gif
*



That's my point! Even with you, it's still a nice place! tongue.gif
Mata
QUOTE (Astarael @ Nov 3 2005, 10:07 PM)
All my knowledge of the UK stems from what I know from people here, history class, and fantasy novels set in some part of the UK timeline. Someday when I'm feeling motivated I might bother to do more reserach.
*

Everything you need to know about British culture can be gained from watching Shaun of the Dead and reading Christopher Fowler's horror novels. Past that, all knowledge of the UK is trivial.
CommieBastard
Advanced students should watch Spaced.

And Withnail & I biggrin.gif
Snugglebum the Destroyer
QUOTE
Christopher Fowler's horror novels.


biggrin.gif Wouldn't it be cool if Roofworld was really, really real though?

*crawls back under the rock as she realises she used up all her good vocabulary at work*

/spam
Astarael
Ooh, good stuff I can liberate from the library! I'll remember and read those books if I can find it at a library or get it from Amazon (using the handy-dandy Matazone links.) biggrin.gif
Just glanced back. Is Shaun of the Dead a movie or a TV show?
pgrmdave
It's a movie.
Mata
It's not just 'a movie', it's the perfect representation of British attitudes and sensibilities in the early 21st century! Well... Okay, maybe that's stretching things a bit, but it does a very good job of showing the way that British men and women think. It's also, in my opinion, one the best and funniest British films ever made, even up there with the Ealing classics and Monty Python and the Holy Grail.
Astarael
I'll be sure to see it, then, but I may have to wait a few months, as it's rated R and my seventeenth birthday won't be for a while. Picky parents and their movie age restictions....
Sounds like a funny movie. Zombies are always fun to watch. smile.gif
Mata
It is pretty gory, occasionally violent, and even a bit scary at times... But magically in a few months you will be far more capable of handling this stuff than you are now!

Another thing about the film is that it is very realistic in the way it represents the British devotion to pubs. We love them. Lots. (Personally I'll love them a lot more when they ban smoking in them, but that's another topic completely.) I think it's sometimes a little hard for other cultures to understand how deeply central to British culture the pub really is, but Shaun of the Dead illustrates it well.
Usurper MrTeapot
Our pub has banned smoking at the bar, theres a taped line a foot around it. Its some form of forcefield that prevents smoke from drifting over it and into the bar.

Apparently its a health hazard to our staff, who either smoke or aren't really bothered. *shrug*
CommieBastard
QUOTE (Mata @ Nov 5 2005, 06:07 PM)
Another thing about the film is that it is very realistic in the way it represents the British devotion to pubs. We love them. Lots.  (Personally I'll love them a lot more when they ban smoking in them, but that's another topic completely.) I think it's sometimes a little hard for other cultures to understand how deeply central to British culture the pub really is, but Shaun of the Dead illustrates it well.
*


And the deep attachment we conceive for the specific pubs we really like. I've found a great one here in Sheffield, the Devonshire Cat. It's a lovely place, got a good cider range.
Mata
That's true, and highlights something else about pubs: there can be a massive difference in the people, place, and tone between pubs even a few metres away from eachother, and so when you find one that you like you do become very dedicated to it.
Astarael
I was having a talk with my grandparents at lunch, and somehow we got onto the topic of the metric system and how widely it's used in different places. I know that the English unit for weighing people is a stone, but I'm not sure how deeply metric goes into everyday British life, and the grandparents are curious. So here's some questions:
1) Do most cooking recipes use kilos, grams, and liters or teaspoons, cups, and ounces?
2) When you're buying cloth, is it purchased in yards and inches or meters and centimeters?
3) Are steaks and fish and the like in restaurants sold by ounces and pounds or kilos and grams?
If you have any other examples of where the metric system is and isn't used, I'd like to hear them. Thanks! smile.gif
Phyllis
Fabric is sold in meters.

Distances and speeds are measured in miles, not kilometers.

Food is generally weighed using the metric system when you're cooking, I think. Kitchens generally have scales which are used to measure dry ingredients for recipes and stuff.

Erm...that's all I can think of at the moment. Oh, beer comes in pints. In pubs it does, anyway. I didn't pay attention to what it said on the actual bottle or can when purchased from a supermarket or something.
I_am_the_best
I find that food is in ounces most of the time...
Phyllis
QUOTE (I_am_the_best @ Nov 6 2005, 01:37 PM)
I find that food is in ounces most of the time...
*

Is it? I never paid attention to packages, just remembered from baking a cake with snoo that we weighed things on the kitchen scale in grams.
Usurper MrTeapot
Quite a few things have both.

And bottles and cans are in mls.
Mata
In shops they have to do things in metric weight even though most custmores might ask for a pound of meat. It's a legal thing passed down from Europe (the European parliment has a lot of say over what becomes law in the UK. It's complicated why, and not everyone is very happy about it).

Cooking instructions usually primarily have grams and then ounces in brackets.

Most people in the UK haven't got a clue how many of one thing equate to the number in another system. Personally I have no idea what freezing is in farenheit, I always use celcius.
Kitty
32 degrees fahrenheit is freezing tongue.gif For water anyway.
Mata
Ah good. I had '32' in my head, but I thought it might be related to something else. I have no number in my head when I think of the boiling point, so it's fair to say I really don't know that one, rather than just think I don't. smile.gif
Phyllis
212 F is the boiling point of water. Whee for random numbers...

I really need to make myself a chart with temperatures in F and C, so I can compare them side by side. I have no idea what people are talking about when they say it's 25 C or something. I have a vague idea that it might be warm, but that's about it. It's only when temperatures get near 0 that I have any clue what the weather would feel like.
Mata
I work on this theory:

0 C is freezing

15 C in my office means my fingers are getting cold and it's time to give the heating a quick blast

32 C is desert-hot

100 C is boiling
pgrmdave
32 F is freezing

60 F in my office means my fingers are getting cold and it's time to give the heating a quick blast

90 F is desert-hot

212 F is boiling

They are nearly exact, it was actually 59 F and 89.6 F, but it's close enough.

For anybody who's curious, the conversion is this:

F = 1.8 * C + 32
or
C = (5/9) * (F - 32)
Kitty
QUOTE (pgrmdave @ Nov 7 2005, 12:05 AM)
60 F in my office means my fingers are getting cold and it's time to give the heating a quick blast

*


Anything below 68 F is too cold for me! Atleast for just sitting around in

50 F is the lowest temp they'll accept for us to go outside in during p.e. This means that we'll freeze to death unless we keep running seeing as our gym clothes are shorts and t-shirts
Rykan
I know we've moved on from Shaun of the dead being a representation of English life, but may I just lastly throw in a recomendation to watch Red Dwarf? It'll show you exactly what English humor is like, among other Englishy type things, heh.
Sir Psycho Sexy
QUOTE (Kitty @ Nov 7 2005, 09:43 AM)
50 F is the lowest temp they'll accept for us to go outside in during p.e. This means that we'll freeze to death unless we keep running seeing as our gym clothes are shorts and t-shirts
*


You're kidding! I remember practicing Rugby tackles in the SNOW!
pgrmdave
I tend to wear short sleeves until it gets below 40F (4.4C), then I might put on a light jacket. Below 25F (-4C) I tend to wear a heavy coat.
Mata
You are from Scotland though aren't you? Has central heating been invented up there yet? wink.gif

I remember 'playing' (to be pronounced as 'trying to avoid getting the ball during') rugby when there was very heavy frost on the grass. I'm not sure about snow, but I wouldn't have been surprised. It's no wonder I was rubbish at it, my fingers felt so raw with the cold it felt like they'd snap off every time I caught the ball!
Moosh
QUOTE (Astarael @ Nov 6 2005, 07:47 PM)
1) Do most cooking recipes use kilos, grams, and liters or teaspoons, cups, and ounces?
2) When you're buying cloth, is it purchased in yards and inches or meters and centimeters?
3) Are steaks and fish and the like in restaurants sold by ounces and pounds or kilos and grams?
*


1) When cooking, I use pounds and ounces, as do most reciepes I know.

2) Cloth if bought on Market is more likely to be sold in yards, if bought from shop then metres.

3) You buy steak and fish in restaurants in oz.

Distances except in Science classes are in miles, yards, feet and inches.

Petrol is sold in litres, beer is sold in pints.

QUOTE (Rykan @ Nov 7 2005, 11:13 AM)
I know we've moved on from Shaun of the dead being a representation of English life, but may I just lastly throw in a recomendation to watch Red Dwarf? It'll show you exactly what English humor is like, among other Englishy type things, heh.
*


Can I add the Mighty Boosh to this catagory?

QUOTE (Sir_Psycho_Sexy @ Nov 7 2005, 03:10 PM)
QUOTE (Kitty @ Nov 7 2005, 09:43 AM)
50 F is the lowest temp they'll accept for us to go outside in during p.e. This means that we'll freeze to death unless we keep running seeing as our gym clothes are shorts and t-shirts
*


You're kidding! I remember practicing Rugby tackles in the SNOW!
*



We play rugby in the snow, and whne the ground is frozen. And when it's raining heavily.

The only reasons not to play because of weather are:

1) It's raining so hard you can't see

2) More than one person has collapsed from the cold/heat
Sky
The laws of thermo-dynamics run away when they see me coming. How cold I am never seems to bear any sort of connection to the actual temperature.

London - speaking as a fellow not-from-London person - the city confuses me. It's hard to think of it as one place; it's like someone chose 30 towns at random and then removed all the space in between them. You get a totally different impression whenever you go. And I'm sure that parts of the underground don't exsist on Wednesdays.
Daria
YES! The mighty Boosh!


"Neil Amstrong walking on my face"...

It depends on where you buy the stuff from, and from whom you learnt how to cook- my granma taught me, so I always used pounds and ounces.


As for the temperature scale- I think we should all use Kelvin...
Phyllis
The only reason we ever didn't go outside in PE was if it was raining or snowing. Other than that....hmm. I think we ran outside if there was just a little snow on the ground. If it was too deep, we stayed inside, though.

And I live in a fairly cold place. Snow all winter. *shrug* Maybe it's changed in the 8 years or so since I took a PE class. Or maybe it just depends on the state.

...and is it just me who would hardly call 90 degrees F "desert-hot?" If it was somewhere like England or the East coast of America, I'd call it really really unpleasantly muggy, though. The air is so thick I sometimes thought it'd be faster to swim than walk...blegh. I hate that. It's quite hot here during summer, but it's also really dry.

Red Dwarf is quite funny, but the main guy's accent! I could not understand what he said for the life of me. unsure.gif Might have just been me though...other Americans might not have problems with it. It definitely takes some getting used to....
Moosh
QUOTE (candice @ Nov 7 2005, 07:17 PM)
Red Dwarf is quite funny, but the main guy's accent!  I could not understand what he said for the life of me.  unsure.gif  Might have just been me though...other Americans might not have problems with it.  It definitely takes some getting used to....
*


If you meant Lister, he was meant to be a scouser, therefor his accent may well be hard to understand for non-Brits. Did you see the original version, or the version that was shown in America? 'Cos they censored it a fair bit and took out all the 'politically incorrect' jokes for the american one.
Rykan
QUOTE (CheeseMoose @ Nov 7 2005, 08:30 PM)
If you meant Lister, he was meant to be a scouser, therefor his accent may well be hard to understand for non-Brits. Did you see the original version, or the version that was shown in America? 'Cos they censored it a fair bit and took out all the 'politically incorrect' jokes for the american one.
*


Oh yes of course; being brought up being used to that accent we usualy don't have much trouble understanding anyone scouser.
The American version really did suck, I'm not surprised it didn't take off.
Phyllis
QUOTE (CheeseMoose @ Nov 7 2005, 11:30 AM)
If you meant Lister, he was meant to be a scouser, therefor his accent may well be hard to understand for non-Brits. Did you see the original version, or the version that was shown in America? 'Cos they censored it a fair bit and took out all the 'politically incorrect' jokes for the american one.
*

Yeah! That's his name. I meant Lister.

And I saw the original version when I was in the UK. I never got whatever channel the American version was on, so I've never seen that. I was watching it for about 10 minutes with moop and snoo, then I said, "You know...I can't understand a word that guy is saying!" I think it was a combination of the accent and the fact that he talked quite fast. I was still trying to decipher the beginning of his sentences when he'd reached the end, and I just couldn't quite keep up with him.
Astarael
QUOTE (Mata @ Nov 7 2005, 12:09 PM)
I remember 'playing' (to be pronounced as 'trying to avoid getting the ball during') rugby when there was very heavy frost on the grass. I'm not sure about snow, but I wouldn't have been surprised. It's no wonder I was rubbish at it, my fingers felt so raw with the cold it felt like they'd snap off every time I caught the ball!
*

The underlined bit describes my method of dealing with *every* team sports event that has *ever* been forced on me. I have all the athletic ability, speed, and instinct for sports as a one-legged pacifist duck. Thus, I had to get very good at looking as though I was trying to get the ball whilst really staying well away the athletic action. I was complete rubbish even without the cold, so I've developed an aversion to all organized physical sports. I live in the South(eastern) U.S., so we got pulled inside whenever it got below 40. We get school cancelled for about two inches of snow as well. It doesn't snow often enough to merit anything but a few de-icing crews, so there isn't much of a way to deal with the snow except waiting. It's funny seeing just a tiny bit of snow closing down so much. laugh.gif
Usurper MrTeapot
Pfft. We weren't allowed to play rugby if it wasn't snowing or raining, we'd have our boots removed and anyone who refused to play got to wear the "pansy pants".

Also at the end of the game we were inspected, if anyone wasn't covered from head to toe in freezing mud then we'd have to drop and roll out way to the changing rooms, making sure we didn't miss puddles.
Mata
QUOTE (candice @ Nov 7 2005, 07:17 PM)
...and is it just me who would hardly call 90 degrees F "desert-hot?"  If it was somewhere like England or the East coast of America, I'd call it really really unpleasantly muggy, though.

I call it that because that's how hot it was in the desert in the shade, so I know how hot it feels!

QUOTE
Red Dwarf is quite funny, but the main guy's accent!  I could not understand what he said for the life of me.  unsure.gif  Might have just been me though...other Americans might not have problems with it.  It definitely takes some getting used to....
*

That is among the lightest scouse accents I've ever heard. You should try understanding a real scouse accent: the English can't understand them, anyone from the rest of the world just doesn't stand a chance! Scousers and jordies have accents that are completely impenetrable. A really strong Birmingham accent can be pretty bad too, although the brummies I've met from on here aren't too bad.

QUOTE (MrTeapot @ Nov 8 2005, 12:49 AM)
Also at the end of the game we were inspected, if anyone wasn't covered from head to toe in freezing mud then we'd have to drop and roll out way to the changing rooms, making sure we didn't miss puddles.
*

biggrin.gif I'd forgotten about that! I think it was mentioned by my teachers but I don't remember it ever being enforced.
CommieBastard
Isn't it "Geordie"?

Brummies aren't bad, they just do weird things to vowels is all. A strong rural Yorkshire or Bristol accent is a difficult one.
Cath Sparrow
QUOTE (Sky @ Nov 7 2005, 06:44 PM)
The laws of thermo-dynamics run away when they see me coming. How cold I am never seems to bear any sort of connection to the actual temperature.

London - speaking as a fellow not-from-London person - the city confuses me. It's hard to think of it as one place; it's like someone chose 30 towns at random and then removed all the space in between them. You get a totally different impression whenever you go. And I'm sure that parts of the underground don't exsist on Wednesdays.
*


I lived in London for 2 years and I know what you mean about it feeling disconnected. I feel it's useing the underground that does it, after a while I started taking the bus and when the there was tube strikes walking from Oxford street to Waterloo (I worked in centeral London and lived near Richmond) and just doing that gave so much of a better feel for the place and I now have a better perspective of part of the center of London.

QUOTE (candice @ Nov 7 2005, 09:58 PM)
QUOTE (CheeseMoose @ Nov 7 2005, 11:30 AM)
If you meant Lister, he was meant to be a scouser, therefor his accent may well be hard to understand for non-Brits. Did you see the original version, or the version that was shown in America? 'Cos they censored it a fair bit and took out all the 'politically incorrect' jokes for the american one.
*

Yeah! That's his name. I meant Lister.

And I saw the original version when I was in the UK. I never got whatever channel the American version was on, so I've never seen that. I was watching it for about 10 minutes with moop and snoo, then I said, "You know...I can't understand a word that guy is saying!" I think it was a combination of the accent and the fact that he talked quite fast. I was still trying to decipher the beginning of his sentences when he'd reached the end, and I just couldn't quite keep up with him.
*



Haha! This is the reason you couldn't understand me on the phone!!!!! It's the area I come from nothing to do with the caffine! tongue.gif
I have really problem with understanding accents from that point London was hell for me, and also Dublin loved the city couldn't understand anyone! Heavy Irish accents are very difficult to understand.
Mata
QUOTE (CommieBastard @ Nov 8 2005, 12:51 PM)
Isn't it "Geordie"?

That's the one. I knew the spelling was wrong, but googling just gave me links to other people who couldn't remember how to spell it either! biggrin.gif

QUOTE
Brummies aren't bad, they just do weird things to vowels is all. A strong rural Yorkshire or Bristol accent is a difficult one.
*

Oo ar, whaaz yer taaalking abar?
pgrmdave
It amazes me that in an area a little bigger than Nebraska there are such varied accents. I couldn't imagine what it would be like if the United States had such localized accents to such a degree.
Mata
To Brits it's amazing that the US doesn't have as many accents as we do!

I think it's because of the ways that the countries grew. People in the rural UK have often lived there for centuries, from times when there was very little transport, so movement and mixing was statisitcally uncommon in the population (think of the hobbits taking one more step to go further away from their village than they've ever been before and you've got a classic image of rural Britain). In contrast, the expansion of the US was precisely that, a rapid movement spreading people thinly as it went. It was based on lines of transport and communication so you had large homogenous groups settling over wide areas.

Some of Britain is still like this. I have a friend whose mother has only recently left Cornwall on a day trip for the first time in her life. She's in her late fifties and found London terrifying!
Daria
I seem to get on pretty well with accents. But then again, I come from a very rural area so you get the ol' cun'ry tokkin' and also I had a Glaswegian (sp?) RS, so from the age of 11 I got used to "a" being "e" etc etc.

Why doesn't America have as many different accents as in Britain? I mean, there are some obvious different ones- the Texan drawl, a New Yorker's accent, a Chicago accent, Californian (ok, forgive me for thinking of Valley Girl by Frank Zappa here biggrin.gif) accent.

But are they really that obvious? Would an American beable to listen to a person talk and say "you come from [insert place name here]" as most British people would beable to do?
Phyllis
But...but!!! Lister talks FAST! And so did Cath on the phone... unsure.gif

Though I didn't have any trouble understanding Cath in person. I think it's cause I could look at her face and read her lips or something.

For the most part, accents were really mild and easy for me to understand since I was in Worcestershire....but when we went to Glasgow... blink.gif Well, I guess it wasn't Glasgow, it was outside it. We were at Tesco's and the clerk was asking me if I'd like her to help me pack what I'd bought (oh, there's another difference...even though I think FMA has vacated the thread...you generally pack your own groceries there). I had NO CLUE what she was saying. I said "Pardon?" twice...then just decided to agree with whatever she was offering because it'd be quicker than trying to understand her. Then in a chip shop on the way back to our hotel (actually in Glasgow this time) I had quite a lot of trouble understanding the clerk there as well. But I blame that one on it being 2 AM and me being drunk....

Oho...I want all the Americans to try saying the following place names: Loughborough, Gloucestershire, Leicestershire, Cirencester, Worcester...uhm. That'll do, for now. evil.gif Mainly cause I just woke up and cannot be bothered to think of more...

Also, American accents are starting to get more varied, slowly. You still wouldn't talk to me and say "Wow, you have such a strong Oregonian accent!" You'd probably just assume I was from somewhere in that huge region known as Western America. But the differences between regions are more pronounced than they were during my grandparents' generation. For instance, most young people from the Pacific Northwest cannot pronounce the words "cot" and "caught" differently (including me...it either sounds Southern or like the word "coat" if I try) Our language has just evolved differently...probably more slowly because, like Mata said, of things like public transport. But you can see the most pronounced regional differences on the East Coast, where people have obviously been there longer.

Do you speak American quiz. I did horribly...only 1/20. And I didn't even get my OWN accent correct. The differences are often subtle (especially in the West), but they're gradually becoming more pronounced. Though I was pretty close with all of them.
Moosh
QUOTE (candice @ Nov 8 2005, 06:19 PM)
Do you speak American quiz.  I did horribly...only 1/20.  And I didn't even get my OWN accent correct.  The differences are often subtle (especially in the West), but they're gradually becoming more pronounced.
*


I also got one out of twenty, but I did fairly well on getting the ones which were the same together.
pgrmdave
I got three right, and most of the ones that I got wrong were close i.e. New England and Mid Atlantic, or Midland and South. And America has a lot of different accents, but they are much more similar than British. In just the northern part of New Jersey there are at least three, possibly four very different accents, being Jersey City (known for saying Joisey City), the other city-like parts (known for correctly pronouncing Newark as Nork tongue.gif ) and the highlands (known for pronouncing water as wudder).
Phyllis
But Dave, have you tried saying the British place names I listed? Come on, amuse me! Dance, monkey, dance!

Ahem. biggrin.gif

So, to answer your question, Daria...most of us could probably tell if someone was from the South, Northeast, Midwest, or West...but unless we were from the actual region it'd be hard to be more specific than that. And if we're from the West....it'd be really hard to be very specific at all (though I can generally tell right away if someone is from California originally and has just moved up to Oregon). The "West" is literally almost the size of HALF of America. The "Midwest" is further East than West, which I never understood.

And an NYC accent may not be what you think it is. wink.gif Almost every borough of NYC has a different accent...or at least it seemed that way to me. What people think of as a stereotypical NYC accent is really a Brooklyn accent. Most people in Manhattan speak close to the way I speak, unless you get into areas like Harlem.
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