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bryden42
Ok just reading the stupid things you shouldn't try thread, and witnessing the chips v fries discussion and thought I'd invite the matazone to share their Yank vs Pom language differences.

I'll start with

Aluminum

vs

Aluminium

Any more?
Ashbless
Ooh, the word is POM. I originally read it as PORN and didn't really understand the topic. blush.gif

Rubber vs. Eraser has always been a favourite.
bryden42
QUOTE (Ashbless @ Apr 7 2006, 03:15 PM)
Ooh, the word is POM.  I originally read it as PORN and didn't really understand the topic.  blush.gif

Rubber vs. Eraser  has always been a favourite.
*


Oh my god, yank and porn in the same sentance, That could be a little on the misleading side,
as could asking for a rubber in an American stationers! laugh.gif
Phyllis
QUOTE (Ashbless @ Apr 7 2006, 06:15 AM)
Ooh, the word is POM.  I originally read it as PORN and didn't really understand the topic.  blush.gif
*

I did too!

Let's see.

Squash is something you can drink over there (though it's also the other thing..the gourd. And it's a game of some sport as well, isn't it?).

The different meanings in each place of the words fag and fanny.

Okay, for the rest....I'll write US word, then UK word.

Zuccini (sp?) vs. Courgette

Corn vs. Sweetcorn (though that's an iffy one because sometimes corn in a can is labeled as sweet corn here, but everyone still just calls it corn. And it NEVER appears anywhere near pizza....crazy Brits)

Can vs. Tin

Candy bar vs. Chocolate bar

Chips vs. Crisps

Soccer vs. Football (though really that's a rest of the world thing outside of the US and Canada)

Football vs. American football

And I'll think of more, just give me awhile...
{Gothic Angel}
What about all the words which are the same but get pronounced differently? Like Jaguar? And Lieutenant (Which I can't spell, but you get the idea)?
Phyllis
QUOTE ({Gothic Angel} @ Apr 7 2006, 10:34 AM)
What about all the words which are the same but get pronounced differently? Like Jaguar? And Lieutenant (Which I can't spell, but you get the idea)?
*

Oh! Or, my personal favorite, Nicaragua!

If you are American or Canadian, you HAVE NOT LIVED until you have heard a Brit say that (if you are from elsewhere, I don't know how they say it in Australia and stuff..and if Spanish is your native language then you may just cringe rather than laugh).

There's also Los Angeles and Maryland as far as pronounciation goes.

One weird one I've noticed is that no one over there ever seems to say "the US"....it's almost always "America." I was taught to try to say "the US" because saying "America" is offensive to some people (due to the fact that there are two whole continents with the word "America" in the title, so it's seen as kind of egocentric for one country to claim the word for itself). That's not a particularly big one, because some people here call it America as well.
Felander
Jam vs Jelly

Rubbish vs Trash

Lift vs Elevator

Erm... there are a load more, but I've just gone blank.
{Gothic Angel}
Ni-cah-rag-yoo-ah. That's how it's fricken spelt.

We had the language first, damnit! tongue.gif

And whilst I remember [color!=purple], [colour=purple].

It's interesting that on a forum full of grammar and spelling nazis, this hasn't caused bloodshed before tongue.gif
Phyllis
QUOTE ({Gothic Angel} @ Apr 7 2006, 10:41 AM)
Ni-cah-rag-yoo-ah. That's how it's fricken spelt.

We had the language first, damnit! tongue.gif

*

But Nicaragua is Spanish, dear. That's not how it is said according to Spanish phoenetics.

We also say jam. It depends on the type of preserves, I think.

But there is Jello vs. Jelly.

Eye doctor or Optometrist vs. Optician

Check vs. Cheque
{Gothic Angel}
QUOTE (candice @ Apr 7 2006, 06:44 PM)
But Nicaragua is Spanish, dear.† That's not how it is said according to Spanish phoenetics.


Ok, fair point. But when I say "France" I don't say it in a French accent, or use french phonetics. I know it's a little different because it's actually the same word, but when you're saying something in English (or American English, indeed), you'd expect it to be pronounced with the appropriate accent. Just becuse the word happens to be the same for something in 2 languages, doesn't mean it's the same word in terms of phonetics and such in both.

Of course, given I have absolutely no background in language studies, besides actually attempting to learn to speak 3, at all, I may be completely wrong and just being pedantic. This is made all the more likely by the fact I actually care very little how the damn word is pronounced tongue.gif
Phyllis
I'm just a fan of trying to say place names at least close to the way that people from the place say it. It's a side effect of growing up in Oregon and getting annoyed at people who said "Or-eee-gone" my whole life. tongue.gif I just think people should generally try to pronounce the name of a person or place the way that person or people who live there say it. They're the ones who say what is proper.

According to my accent, I should pronounce the names of Birmingham, Alabama and the Birmingham in the UK the same, but I don't. Nor do I say Lye-kester, or Gl-ow-chester-shyre, though that is indeed how they would be pronounced with my accent. I do my best to say them the way locals would. Don't always get it right, but I try.

My very least favorite one:

Candice. Cand-iss in the US, Cand-eeeese in the UK. The latter has never been the proper way to say my name, and never will be. I'd rather be called Candy (which I hate) before being called Cand-eeeeeese.
trunks_girl26
QUOTE (candice @ Apr 7 2006, 01:44 PM)
We also say jam.  It depends on the type of preserves, I think.

*


[geek] Actually, it depends on the size of the fruit parts. Preserves have the largest pieces of fruit, then jams, then jellies[/geek]

I might be wrong on this one but

Cell phone vs. mobile?
{Gothic Angel}
Heh, I say cand-iss. At least I got that one right happy.gif

And yeah, Ange, We say Mobile. Or even just phone.
Phyllis
You're one of the few, Jen!

Thought of another one...

Bandaids vs. Plasters.

Also, here...Yankee only = someone North of the Mason-Dixon line. Most Southerners aren't fond of being called Yanks.
Daria
Oestrogen Vs Estrogen
Sulphur Vs Sulfur
Foetus Vs Fetus

Can you tell who the pissed off scientist is? tongue.gif
Phyllis
The different meanings of biscuit. There, it's a hard thing that kind of resembles a cookie. Here it's a fluffy bread thing to eat with dinner.

OH! One that confused me a lot the first time I saw it...lemonade.

moop, Commie, and Teapot all ordered lemonade. I was puzzled when the waitress brought them a 7-up looking concoction.

US lemonade = old fashioned lemonade. Made from actual squeezed lemons, sugar, and still water.
michael1384
Phone vs. fone
Phyllis
QUOTE (michael1384 @ Apr 7 2006, 01:03 PM)
Phone vs. fone
*

Pardon?

"fone" is not correct in either country.
Mutilation
Tap vs Faucet came up a while ago. Also, hearing American news-readers say Iraq sounds a bit strange to me, as they say it like "Eye-Rack".
gothictheysay
You have 666 posts ohmy.gif

I'm sure we've done at least one thread like this before - cupcakes vs. fairy cake or something. The best part is just to acknowledge the difference as opposed to getting into little arguments about how one language is better than another, even if you're just kidding around. Daria mentioned a few that follow the "oe" that you seem to have that we don't, and in some words it's "ae" (haemoglobin vs. hemoglobin).
Righteous
Circles vs Roundabout

The way my dad described ordering beer in the UK (sonds confusing)

"Zed" as opposed to "zee"

And "U"s up the galley!

I'm a huge fan of UK slang. Whenever we watch a movie (picture?) with UK slang, I feel strangely excited (and have to translate).

Oh, and of course crisps vs chips, chips vs fries and tap vs faucet (or sink fixture).
Phyllis
QUOTE (Righteous @ Apr 7 2006, 07:45 PM)
The way my dad described ordering beer in the UK (sonds confusing)
*

How did he order a beer in a confusing way? It seemed the same to me in both places...just different names for the beer. You sure he didn't ask a local and the person he asked wasn't just taking the pi...oh there's another one. biggrin.gif Not sure if it's forum appropriate, though. Can we say that here?

And we don't call them "circles" where I live. They're "traffic circles" in the DMV handbook, I think, but I have yet to actually see one in the entire state. I've also generally heard "film" over there where we would say "movie." I never heard anyone say "picture," but that might just be the people I know.

Oh, that reminds me.

Movie theater vs. Cinema

Pacifier vs. Dummy (I'm not exactly sure how my mind went from movie theaters to babies, but whatever)

Diaper vs....argh what is the word? Nappie? I think that's the word.

Stroller vs. Pram

Trash Can vs. Bin

I only heard this one sometimes, but Napkin vs. Serviette.

Popsicle vs. Ice Lolly?

Galoshes vs. Wellies (doesn't "galoshes" mean something different there? Like those lame plastic things that go over your shoes? The American equivalent of Wellies are definitely called galoshes, though. Or rubber boots).

Mom vs. Mum, of course

Sidewalk vs. Pavement

Sneakers or Tennis Shoes (depending on your region in the US) vs. Trainers? I think?

And when talking about cars...

Hood vs. Bonnet

Trunk vs. Boot

Signal vs. Indicate? I think.

Pass vs. Overtake...


On the pronunciation front, I want this shirt to state my opinion whenever I have to say the word "tomato." Warning: here there be profanity. I will abandon what is proper pronunciation for my particular accent for the names of people and places, but not for a freaking fruit. biggrin.gif

I'll be back with more, I'm sure. I know that I know a ton, but it's kind of difficult to think of them off the top of my head. I still maintain that chips and fries are not the same thing. They are steak fries here, consarnit tongue.gif
Mutilation
QUOTE (Righteous @ Apr 8 2006, 03:45 AM)
The way my dad described ordering beer in the UK (sonds confusing)
*


It's really easy in the UK, you just say "Pint of wifebeater please".
El Nino
QUOTE (candice @ Apr 7 2006, 06:59 PM)
My very least favorite one:

Candice.  Cand-iss in the US, Cand-eeeese in the UK.  The latter has never been the proper way to say my name, and never will be.  I'd rather be called Candy (which I hate) before being called Cand-eeeeeese.
*

I'm English and I've always thought that your name was pronounced Cand-iss

Anyway my little contribution

Egg plant - Aubergine
Moosh
QUOTE (candice @ Apr 8 2006, 05:04 AM)
QUOTE (Righteous @ Apr 7 2006, 07:45 PM)
The way my dad described ordering beer in the UK (sonds confusing)
*

How did he order a beer in a confusing way? It seemed the same to me in both places...just different names for the beer. You sure he didn't ask a local and the person he asked wasn't just taking the pi...oh there's another one. biggrin.gif Not sure if it's forum appropriate, though. Can we say that here?


How could ordering beer be confusing? You just say, "A pint of (either name of beer or just bitter/lager) please."

QUOTE
I only heard this one sometimes, but Napkin vs. Serviette.


I always understood that napkins were made of cloth and serviettes were made of paper, but that could just be me.

QUOTE
I still maintain that chips and fries are not the same thing.  They are steak fries here, consarnit tongue.gif
*


Yes. Fries are the really thin ones you get from Maccy's etc, whereas chips are thick and bought from chip shops.

I can't think of any that haven't already been said at the moment.
Usurper MrTeapot
Paedophile - Pedaphile.
Clatterpop
Examples of pronunciation that I find baffling include "erbs" instead of "herbs" and "rout" instead of "route" (pronounced root surely). I thought a rout was an overwhelming defeat. huh.gif
Phyllis
The route one depends on what region you're from in the US. Some people do say it "root" here (though not me biggrin.gif ). Don't see why it's baffling, though. Surely you know what they mean if you've heard it enough times to list it here. tongue.gif

I think you're probably right about the napkin/serviette thing, CM. The only time I heard serviette was referring to paper napkins. Either way, we call them both napkins here.
froggle-rock
I liked the way Jaq and Cand say the b, o, double l, o, x word.

/me giggles like a naughty school girl

Oh, route reminds me of router (for making puters connect to the interweb). Rooter/ Roughter. (Please excuse if my attempt at phonetics just confuzles more.)

Hmm, think about sweet corn vs corn. Maybe because of corn flour, and popping corn. I guess maybe we say sweet corn to pre-emtivly distinguish?
bryden42
so what is corn bread? I now have horrible images of bread with sweet corn in it blink.gif
Phyllis
Corn bread is DELICIOUS, that's what it is.

There aren't hunks of sweet corn in it. It's made from corn meal (which is ground up "sweet corn"...though obviously we just call it corn) rather than flour that is made from ground up wheat...and it's just one of those things that is really hard to describe if you haven't had it. I can't imagine eating chilli without it. I fully intend to have my mama ship me corn meal if it proves impossible to find there (pretty sure it will..you guys are kind of lacking in the corn department). biggrin.gif

And to answer Frog's question. When the settlers came to the new world, "corn" was a name for any edible grassy thing with seeds...like wheat. They took what we call corn with them when they went back across the pond, and called it "sweet corn" to distinguish it from other types of corn. But here it somehow ended up just being called corn, and wheat is wheat...never corn.
ravein
QUOTE (candice @ Apr 8 2006, 02:28 PM)
Corn bread is DELICIOUS, that's what it is.

There aren't hunks of sweet corn in it.  It's made from corn meal (which is ground up "sweet corn"...though obviously we just call it corn) rather than flour...and it's just one of those things that is really hard to describe if you haven't had it.  I can't imagine eating chilli without it.  I fully intend to have my mama ship me corn meal if it proves impossible to find there (pretty sure it will..you guys are kind of lacking in the corn department).  biggrin.gif

And to answer Frog's question.  When the settlers came to the new world, "corn" was a name for any edible grassy thing with seeds...like wheat.  They took what we call corn with them when they went back across the pond, and called it "sweet corn" to distinguish it from other types of corn.  But here it somehow ended up just being called corn, and wheat is wheat...never corn.
*



Actually I went to dinner at a friendís house that is not from the south and they actually put corn in the corn bread! I explained that you don't really put corn in corn bread; it is made from a corn flour called corn meal (or mill depending from which area you are from). They are from the Arizona/ New Mexico region of the US and it seems that is how it is made there. Personally I think they're nuts.

As far as route is concerned, in my home town (45 mins away from where I live now) it is pronounced "root", where I live now it is pronounced route as in router. However in my home town electrocute is pronounced e-lex-sa-cute.
Phyllis
QUOTE (ravein @ Apr 8 2006, 10:46 AM)
Actually I went to dinner at a friendís house that is not from the south and they actually put corn in the corn bread! I explained that you don't really put corn in corn bread; it is made from a corn flour called corn meal (or mill depending from which area you are from). They are from the Arizona/ New Mexico region of the US and it seems that is how it is made there. Personally I think they're nuts.
*

What?! Crazy. We make it without hunks of corn here in Oregon. I've heard of putting hunks of jalapeŮo in it, but never whole bits of corn. blink.gif
Feyliya
I've had it before, in the South, where it's made with hunks of corn. Mostly it's made of just cornmeal, though.
{Gothic Angel}
QUOTE (Clatterpop @ Apr 8 2006, 12:02 PM)
I thought a rout was an overwhelming defeat.  huh.gif


It's a lonely life being one of us few obscure-word lovers tongue.gif

On a related note: The first cryptic crossword clue I ever solved was "Swimmer last in heat, heavy defeat". (it's relevant once you solve it, I swear.)

Umm, yes. Relevance to topic.

Elevator vs. Lift
Mr Fuzzy
QUOTE (bryden42 @ Apr 7 2006, 09:59 AM)
Aluminum

vs

Aluminium
*


That one really does get on my nerves. Can we say 'ignoring international scientific naming conventions?'
Phyllis
QUOTE (Mr Fuzzy @ Apr 8 2006, 12:33 PM)
QUOTE (bryden42 @ Apr 7 2006, 09:59 AM)
Aluminum

vs

Aluminium
*


That one really does get on my nerves. Can we say 'ignoring international scientific naming conventions?'
*


True. But "sulfur" rather than "sulphur" is correct according to international scientific naming conventions, so....
FeralPolyglot
Yay! One that hasn't been said yet...

US:UK :: Elevator:Lift

<edit>Poop. I didn't see GothicAngel's post. *feels less special* :-p </edit>

I don't think it's argument-worthy to say "Oh, our way's better than your way is." As a linguist, I am very interested in the differences in vernacular that appear from region to region. Even just in the US we have differences such as Soda vs. Pop, vacuum vs. sweeper, Sub vs. Hero vs. Hoagie vs. Grinder (All apparently referring to one type of sandwich), and shopping cart vs. buggy (referring to the apparatus you use in a supermarket to push around all the groceries you accumulate.)

Referring to the "(traffic) circles"/"roundabouts," Are they like "jug-handles?" (New Jersey people should know what I'm talking about if no one else does.)
Phyllis
Oh, you reminded me of another one, in terms of the thing you use when grocery shopping.


Cart vs. Trolley.
Mutilation
QUOTE (FeralPolyglot @ Apr 8 2006, 08:51 PM)
...shopping cart vs. buggy (referring to the apparatus you use in a supermarket to push around all the groceries you accumulate.) 
*


We call those things shopping trollies in the UK, I don't know whether it has anything to do with trolls. blink.gif

Another one I remembered is Pavement vs Sidewalk. Pavement is just a nicer word.
Phyllis
QUOTE (Mutilation @ Apr 8 2006, 12:57 PM)
We call those things shopping trollies in the UK, I don't know whether it has anything to do with trolls.  blink.gif

Another one I remembered is Pavement vs Sidewalk. Pavement is just a nicer word.
*

I mentioned both of those already tongue.gif And perhaps part of why we call it a sidewalk rather than pavement is because our sidewalks are made of different material than yours, generally.
Mr Fuzzy
QUOTE (candice @ Apr 8 2006, 09:39 PM)
True.  But "sulfur" rather than "sulphur" is correct according to international scientific naming conventions, so....
*


The difference there is the many centuries of sulphur being spelled that way before the conventions were codified. Or, indeed, the discovery of aluminium (despite it being one of the most abundant elements on the planet.) tongue.gif

Edit: I should mention that a lot of our spelling differences are actually caused by one petty, petty man and his wish to artificially distance the English spoken by Americans from English spoken by the... Er... English. Yes, Noah Webster had some funny ideas about nationalism.

Extra edit for you crazy cats: Some of the stranger spellings in English are actually the fault of the Dutch typesetters who printed early versions of our dictionaries (for reasons of cost) - they took it upon themselves to 'correct' some of the spellings e.g. Yacht rather than the far easier yot as it was intended to be. [/Etymology_Freak]
Phyllis
QUOTE (Mr Fuzzy @ Apr 8 2006, 01:06 PM)
Edit: I should mention that a lot of our spelling differences are actually caused by one petty, petty man and his wish to artificially distance the English spoken by Americans from English spoken by the... Er... English. Yes, Noah Webster had some funny ideas about nationalism.
*

Yes, yes he did. I learned a little bit about him in Cultural Geography during my freshman year of uni.

He didn't succeed in making Americans pronounce things the same, obviously, but he did succeed with making us spell everything the same. Only problem is that it's different from the rest of the English speaking world. But oh well. We at least know what the other person means when it's spelled differently, as long as it's correct according to British English or American English (doesn't Canadian English have the -ize endings in common with American English? I can't remember if I'm imagining that or not). Slang terms, however....

Pants vs. Trousers
Panties vs. Pants
Mr Fuzzy
I counter with Braces - (theoretically) manly items to hold up trousers VS Suspenders - lacey things which have to be wrestled with to release a pair of stockings.

As a note of interest, the terms Pom and Limey actually come from the navy forcing sailors to consume fruit containing vitamin c. I'm always amused when a they are used as derogatory terms and I can reply with a comment about being free from scurvy. laugh.gif
markslut
*will try and remember how to prononce Candice's name*
ravein
as Eddie Izzard said- through= cheating at scrabble
Clatterpop
Is asphalt the same thing as tarmacadam?
Phyllis
No, it isn't. But our sidewalks are usually made of concrete, not asphalt, if that's what made you ask that.

Gas vs. Petrol
vicrawr
QUOTE (ravein @ Apr 8 2006, 01:46 PM)
QUOTE (candice @ Apr 8 2006, 02:28 PM)
Corn bread is DELICIOUS, that's what it is.

There aren't hunks of sweet corn in it.  It's made from corn meal (which is ground up "sweet corn"...though obviously we just call it corn) rather than flour...and it's just one of those things that is really hard to describe if you haven't had it...
*

[...] it is made from a corn flour called corn meal (or mill depending from which area you are from)...
*


QUOTE (Feyliya @ Apr 8 2006, 02:13 PM)
I've had it before, in the South, where it's made with hunks of corn.  Mostly it's made of just cornmeal, though.
*


I hope you're all speaking of the real cornbread, ie. fried, not baked. Baked cornbread is more like a sweet.

Uk - Beer, US - Piss
Clatterpop
I don't know if the following word is still used much, I hope it is. smile.gif
Chifforobe - Wardrobe
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