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ravein
QUOTE (IrishGuy @ Apr 8 2006, 08:22 PM)
QUOTE (ravein @ Apr 8 2006, 01:46 PM)
QUOTE (candice @ Apr 8 2006, 02:28 PM)
Corn bread is DELICIOUS, that's what it is.

There aren't hunks of sweet corn in it.  It's made from corn meal (which is ground up "sweet corn"...though obviously we just call it corn) rather than flour...and it's just one of those things that is really hard to describe if you haven't had it...
*

[...] it is made from a corn flour called corn meal (or mill depending from which area you are from)...
*


QUOTE (Feyliya @ Apr 8 2006, 02:13 PM)
I've had it before, in the South, where it's made with hunks of corn.  Mostly it's made of just cornmeal, though.
*


I hope you're all speaking of the real cornbread, ie. fried, not baked. Baked cornbread is more like a sweet.

Uk - Beer, US - Piss
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is there any other kind? wink.gif
Although cornbread sticks from Bills BBQ are an exception.
Usurper MrTeapot
QUOTE (IrishGuy @ Apr 9 2006, 12:22 AM)
Uk - Beer, US - Piss
*


Word homie.
*manly tackles Vic for being awesome*
Feyliya
QUOTE (IrishGuy @ Apr 8 2006, 04:22 PM)
I hope you're all speaking of the real cornbread, ie. fried, not baked. Baked cornbread is more like a sweet.
*

I've had both fried and baked cornbread done up with sweet corn in it. Both have been rather good, actually. Fried, it brings out the mellower, more veggie-like taste of the corn; baked brings out the sweet. I should bug my grandma for her recipes, she's the one who made them.

Bird = attractive young lady in Brit-speak. I don't know if you UK folks use the term "chick". If not, that would be the American-speak version.
Usurper MrTeapot
Lorry - Truck
Full stop - Period
Autumn - Fall.
Phyllis
We say autumn as well as fall.

"Chifforobe"??? Which country is that, cause it sure isn't this one. *edit* I just looked it up. It's used in the South, it seems. I'd never heard it before! And I've never had fried cornbread. We bake it here, and yeah it's kind of sweet.

Movie Popcorn vs. I would like some cold, stale cardboard to eat while I watch this film, please. wink.gif

PMS vs. PMT
Mr Fuzzy
QUOTE (candice @ Apr 9 2006, 02:41 AM)
PMS vs. PMT
*

Or even flat-out-psychotic-rampage, complete with destroyed Tokyo. tongue.gif

Pavement VS sidewalk.

Speciality VS specialty.

One hundred and ten VS one hundred ten.

A couple of VS a couple.

Tramp VS bum.

Buttocks (Buh-tuh-x) VS buttocks (Butt-Ox.)

Axe Vs Ax.

Aubergine VS eggplant.

Take away VS take out.

Liquidise VS Homogenize. Actually, all sorts of words we end with ...ise where the counterpart is ...ize too.
Usurper MrTeapot
You do?

I just did a bit of reading in Wikipedia, we Brits used to call it Fall. I always assumed that we had all our words first and the Yanks took them and mutilated them.
Mr Fuzzy
Not all of them. Some are now considered archaic such as gray or gaol.
Phyllis
Yes, we do say both autumn and fall. That one is really up to personal preference. I use either of them, depending on my mood.

The language simply evolved differently, as it does with any colony (or former colony, as the case may be). Just be happy we speak roughly the same language at all. tongue.gif For some reason, language tends to evolve more slowly in a colony than in the parent country. You'll find there are several "American" words like "fall" that originated there, but you just don't use anymore. We're just now starting to see more numerous differing accents, whereas there you have a ton of regional accents. Though, to be honest, I really cannot tell the difference between most of the regional accents there. To me it's basically one of two types: 1) Easy to understand, or 2) Have to attempt to read their lips and say "Pardon?" a lot. biggrin.gif

I had never actually noticed the speciality/specialty thing. We pronounce it the same way, anyway...I think. I pronounce it the way the latter is spelled.
LoLo
UK - Pissed = drunk
US - Pissed = mad about something
Mutilation
QUOTE (LoLo @ Apr 9 2006, 02:36 AM)
UK - Pissed = drunk
US - Pissed = mad about something
*


Nah, we use it for both in the UK, but when you're mad about something you're pissed off.
mooooooooooopo
I love how a lot of the US words are really descriptive, like Side Walk - you walk on it and it's...on the side of the road.
Greeneyes
QUOTE (Mutilation @ Apr 9 2006, 12:59 PM)
QUOTE (LoLo @ Apr 9 2006, 02:36 AM)
UK - Pissed = drunk
US - Pissed = mad about something
*


Nah, we use it for both in the UK, but when you're mad about something you're pissed off.
*



I think perhaps slang is more difficult to point out differences in, since there's no particular rules as to its use. Personally, I use 'pissed' on its own to indicate anger, as well as with the 'off' sometimes.
Phyllis
At any rate, Lo was correct when she said Pissed vs. Drunk. It's definitely not common American slang to use it to mean intoxicated.
Clatterpop
Bum bag - Fanny pack
Quilt - Comforter
Phyllis
QUOTE (Clatterpop @ Apr 9 2006, 02:52 PM)
Quilt - Comforter
*

That's a regional thing in the US, I think. Or maybe just a personal preference thing. Some call it a quilt, some a comforter, some a duvet. (On a technical note it's only a quilt if it has intricate stitching binding the layers. If it just has little ties every few inches, it's a comforter)

As for the bumbag/fanny pack thing...syuu is right in her quote from the quotesite. If you wear one, no matter what you call it, you aren't getting laid this year. biggrin.gif
pgrmdave
QUOTE (FeralPolyglot)
Referring to the "(traffic) circles"/"roundabouts," Are they like "jug-handles?" (New Jersey people should know what I'm talking about if no one else does.)


No, circles are different. It's an intersection in which there are no stops, only yields, and it's a circle...here's a better explanation:
http://www.calgaryarea.com/se/mckenziearea...cle/traffic.htm
Daria
Teeter totter Vs See-saw

What do you call a round-a-bout in a playground?
Phyllis
Both teeter totter and see saw are used here....which do you use there?

A roundabout in a playground is called a merry-go-round here. Those big things with horses are sometimes also called merry-go-rounds, like they are there....but more often people here call them carosels.
snooodlysnoosnoosnoodle
We use see saws.

I've never heard anyone refer to a playground roundabout as a merry go round, only the big ones with horses which we rarely call a carosel
elphaba2
Playground roundabout = large circle with handles that kids spin and then jump on? I used to call it a twirly. Teetor-totters are what we called a very complicated swing-like structure that sat two people.

Do Brits use "phone" to refer to calling someone for something official (i.e: I'll phone her to set up an appointment)? I know it's more prevalent in Canada than "call", but that could be purely a Great Northern thing.
Phyllis
A twirly? I've never heard that one. Always merry-go-round among people from the US that I've met. Twirly is a definitely a new one for me. Though I think we're talking about the same thing, from your description.


Thought of another one...

Restrooms vs. Toilets.
Feyliya
If biscuits vs. cookies aren't down here yet, they should be.

Also, a sweetie in American is your significant other (it also may be used as a general pronoun in the South), not a sugary snack.
froggle-rock
QUOTE (elphaba2 @ Apr 10 2006, 08:33 PM)
Do Brits use "phone" to refer to calling someone for something official (i.e: I'll phone her to set up an appointment)? I know it's more prevalent in Canada than "call", but that could be purely a Great Northern thing.
*


I do use both 'phone' and 'call' to mean to make a telephone call to someone, in either formal settings or informal ones. Though (and correct me if I am wrong) I tend to use 'call' more, as it what I do when I pick up a telephone and dial a number, as opposed to phone which would be what I pick up. But then in just typing out these few sentances, I do think I say 'phone' someone in informal and formal setting, so as to be clear and that I'm not literally going to call (yell) for someone.

Do you othersiders (of the Atlantic) use, to slag some one off? To mean talk bad of some one.. -As in 'He's been slagging me off to all and sundry'
Calantyr
SUV vs. 4x4

Sport Utility Vehicle? What's up with that? The only people who drive them are middle-aged women who have never even seen a mountain bike, but want to surround their children in multiple layers of armour plating whenever they go to the shops.

And does anyone else find it cute the way Yanks pronounce 'France'? It's like they they're saying 'ants' but with a speech-impediment.
Phyllis
QUOTE (Feyliya @ Apr 10 2006, 08:30 PM)
If biscuits vs. cookies aren't down here yet, they should be.

Also, a sweetie in American is your significant other (it also may be used as a general pronoun in the South), not a sugary snack.

*

I already said biscuit vs. cookie, and I think the sugary snack thing is a sweet, not a sweetie. I'm not really sure on that one. I always heard the former, anyway.

Frog: I don't think we have the word "slag" here at all. I've never heard it on this side of the Atlantic, anyway.

Calantyr: I think that the way we say France is the US equivalent of the way you all say Nicaragua. I just wanna giggle and pinch cheeks every time I hear that one. Unfortunately Nicaragua doesn't seem to come up in conversation very often. sad.gif And as for the SUV thing...maybe 1 person in 1,000 actually uses their SUV for its intended purpose. The rest are indeed soccer moms. dry.gif
Usurper MrTeapot
Saw an example today.

Hole in the wall - ATM.
Greeneyes
QUOTE (MrTeapot @ Apr 12 2006, 12:28 PM)
Saw an example today.

Hole in the wall - ATM Machine.
*


ohmy.gif Bad Teapot. There's no such thing as an Automated Transaction Machine Machine tongue.gif
Usurper MrTeapot
No one saw it... tongue.gif Well, except you.
Daria
QUOTE (candice @ Apr 11 2006, 06:31 PM)
QUOTE (Feyliya @ Apr 10 2006, 08:30 PM)
If biscuits vs. cookies aren't down here yet, they should be.

Also, a sweetie in American is your significant other (it also may be used as a general pronoun in the South), not a sugary snack.

*

I already said biscuit vs. cookie, and I think the sugary snack thing is a sweet, not a sweetie. I'm not really sure on that one. I always heard the former, anyway.


*



A sweetie is how your gran would say it- it is just a more patronising way of saying sweet.

Oo, who is it that uses "sweet" instead of pudding? Or is it just resturaunteurs?
snooodlysnoosnoosnoodle
I would say sweet or desert, occasionally pudding but it depends on my mood really.

I can't think of any others.
pgrmdave
One that I learned here - "American" Liberals vs. "Classic" Liberals.
Phyllis
Hose vs. Hosepipe (though moop informs me that both are used there...we never use the word hosepipe)

Resume (but with a little accent above the e) vs. CV

Windshield vs. Windscreen
acid_rain_child
QUOTE (candice @ Apr 9 2006, 11:04 PM)
QUOTE (Clatterpop @ Apr 9 2006, 02:52 PM)
Quilt - Comforter
*

That's a regional thing in the US, I think. Or maybe just a personal preference thing. Some call it a quilt, some a comforter, some a duvet. (On a technical note it's only a quilt if it has intricate stitching binding the layers. If it just has little ties every few inches, it's a comforter)

As for the bumbag/fanny pack thing...syuu is right in her quote from the quotesite. If you wear one, no matter what you call it, you aren't getting laid this year. biggrin.gif
*



A quilt is knitted and a comforter is a big fluffy blanket, usually stuffed with down. A douvet is like a throw, thin with ruffles and whatnot around the edges.

What about chemist vs. pharmacist? I could never call my pharmacist a chemist... when I think of a chemist, I see a man with two test tubes filled with colorful liquids inside laughing maniacally. Or chemistry class *puke* A pharmacist puts pills ina bottle at Walgreens biggrin.gif
voices_in_my_head
Not quite sure on this one but:

backpack VS schoolbag?
Phyllis
QUOTE (acid_rain_child @ Apr 12 2006, 02:45 PM)
A quilt is knitted and a comforter is a big fluffy blanket, usually stuffed with down. A douvet is like a throw, thin with ruffles and whatnot around the edges.
*

...that's just crazy. A quilt is quilted, not knitted. It involves backing, a middle (usually fluffy) bit, and a (usually) pieced top. The quilting is what holds the layers together -- like quilted toilet paper. tongue.gif A knitted or crocheted thing is an afghan. A duvet is another word for comforter. The thing you described as being a duvet is clearly a bedspread.

Voices, I think it's called a rucksack there. That's what moop always called it, anyway. Maybe schoolbag too? I dunno. He wasn't using his for school, so might be different then. *waits for British types to tell us*
EvilSpork
QUOTE (acid_rain_child @ Apr 12 2006, 04:45 PM)
A quilt is knitted and a comforter is a big fluffy blanket, usually stuffed with down. A douvet is like a throw, thin with ruffles and whatnot around the edges.


I think of patchworky type things when I think of a quilt.

A knitted blanket is an afgan. I don't picture knitting as quilting, they are completely different things... So... Quilt =/= knitting.

unsure.gif

Edit: I'm stupid, Cand has it covered.... And cand, I like satchel.
bryden42
QUOTE (candice @ Apr 13 2006, 02:42 AM)
QUOTE (acid_rain_child @ Apr 12 2006, 02:45 PM)
A quilt is knitted and a comforter is a big fluffy blanket, usually stuffed with down. A douvet is like a throw, thin with ruffles and whatnot around the edges.
*

...that's just crazy. A quilt is quilted, not knitted. It involves backing, a middle (usually fluffy) bit, and a (usually) pieced top. The quilting is what holds the layers together -- like quilted toilet paper. tongue.gif A knitted or crocheted thing is an afghan. A duvet is another word for comforter. The thing you described as being a duvet is clearly a bedspread.

Voices, I think it's called a rucksack there. That's what moop always called it, anyway. Maybe schoolbag too? I dunno. He wasn't using his for school, so might be different then. *waits for British types to tell us*
*



I'm fairly indiscriminate on this one, I call it rucksack, backpack and bag
bryden42
oh and what is Grits? I understand that it is food but further than that??????
Phyllis
It's a porridge type thing. Made of ground corn, I think. It's nasty. And you'd have a difficult time finding grits outside the South (though it's not impossible...My grandma was from the South, and she used to make it here. Bleeeugh. Gross stuff).
acid_rain_child
QUOTE (candice @ Apr 13 2006, 01:42 AM)
QUOTE (acid_rain_child @ Apr 12 2006, 02:45 PM)
A quilt is knitted and a comforter is a big fluffy blanket, usually stuffed with down. A douvet is like a throw, thin with ruffles and whatnot around the edges.
*

...that's just crazy. A quilt is quilted, not knitted. It involves backing, a middle (usually fluffy) bit, and a (usually) pieced top. The quilting is what holds the layers together -- like quilted toilet paper. tongue.gif A knitted or crocheted thing is an afghan. A duvet is another word for comforter. The thing you described as being a duvet is clearly a bedspread.


No no no. Quilts are knitted, as are afghans. Well, maybe I'm wrong by society's standpoint, but that's what they're called in my family; my great grandmother made all these things everyone calls quilts, and they're the knitted dealies with holes, made from dozens of squares. Or maybe I've just not been paying enough attention unsure.gif

And what is this "bedspread" of which you speak? Isn't that the thing you put over the mattress but under the sheets?
acid_rain_child
Grits are made from corn, cheese and butter, if I'm not mistaken. I think there's some egg in there somewhere. They're disgusting, but like most gross foods, they look like they should be great.
Phyllis
QUOTE (acid_rain_child @ Apr 13 2006, 12:07 PM)
No no no. Quilts are knitted, as are afghans. Well, maybe I'm wrong by society's standpoint, but that's what they're called in my family; my great grandmother made all these things everyone calls quilts, and they're the knitted dealies with holes, made from dozens of squares. Or maybe I've just not been paying enough attention  unsure.gif

And what is this "bedspread" of which you speak? Isn't that the thing you put over the mattress but under the sheets?
*

No. You are definitely wrong by society's standpoint. Once again...quilts are quilted. Hence the name. Wikipedia agrees with me. The things your great grandmother makes sounds like a granny square afghan.

The thing over the mattress but under the sheets is a mattress pad or mattress protector....

I fear for Bed Bath and Beyond employees if you ever need their assistance in finding something. blink.gif

And grits are nothing more than the corn part. People serve them with different things, such as the cheese and egg that you were talking about.Wikipedia agrees with me here, too.
mooooooooooopo
Sleepers vs Railroad Ties

which leads me to

Railway vs Railroad
elphaba2
QUOTE (candice @ Apr 13 2006, 03:38 PM)
QUOTE (acid_rain_child @ Apr 13 2006, 12:07 PM)
No no no. Quilts are knitted, as are
And what is this "bedspread" of which you speak? Isn't that the thing you put over the mattress but under the sheets?
*

The thing over the mattress but under the sheets is a mattress pad or mattress protector....
*


I think she means a dust ruffle.

Maybe?

Dorky London slang vs Dorky Massachusetts slang
Calantyr
Can't remember if it's posted.

Pavement v's Sidewalk?
Fizzy drink v's Soda?
Evolution v's Heresy?

Yanks are from Venus, Poms are from Mars.
Phyllis
QUOTE (Calantyr @ Apr 14 2006, 10:03 AM)
Pavement v's Sidewalk?
Fizzy drink v's Soda?
Evolution v's Heresy?
*

Pavement vs. Sidewalk has been said a few times.

No one where I live says soda. It's pop here.

And don't be an idiot. Religious fundamentalists aren't the most numerous group, they just shout the loudest. rolleyes.gif
Calantyr
QUOTE (candice @ Apr 14 2006, 06:07 PM)
And don't be an idiot.  Religious fundamentalists aren't the most numerous group, they just shout the loudest.  rolleyes.gif
*


biggrin.gif
Usurper MrTeapot
QUOTE (elphaba2 @ Apr 14 2006, 04:48 PM)
Dorky London slang vs Dorky Massachusetts slang
*


No London slang is dorky.

Leftly, rightly, one more and we're moving forward.
elphaba2
Piffle. All slang is dorky.
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