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Yannick
So... I can't cook for my life. Or, at least I don't. I can follow instructions fairly well, I'm pretty good at judging when stuff is done, but I don't know what to make. Lately I've realized I eat really unhealthily. My day is something like this (in order of most likely occurrence)
Breakfast: Cup of tea/Nothing/Piece of fruit/Cereal/Oatmeal
Snack: Nothing/Trail mix bar/other granola type bar
Lunch: I stopped eating school lunch a long time ago. It's disgusting. So, for the last 3 years it's been: 1 cookie ('bout 10 cm in diameter) and some pink milk/2 cookies and pink milk/nothing.
After school: Several bowls of cereal/brownie or cake batter/oatmeal/lots of random snacks/popcorn/out of the jar or peanut butter/soup/sandwich.

I'm making it my New Years resolution to have at least one real meal a day. Does anyone have any awesome recipes they'd like to share? I'm not a picky eater. I like pretty much all fruits/veggies, and I have nothing against meat. I LOVE mushrooms/creamy sauces, especially creamy mushroom sauces, and the only things I can think of not liking specifically are potatoes. Potato pancakes rock though. Oh, and spicy is alright, as long as I don't need anything to drink with me because of it.

Oh, Chinese food and sushi ftw.

So.. yeah. Got any for me? biggrin.gif
leopold
The daft thing is, Iz, is (biggrin.gif) that you start off okay. As long as you actually eat something for breakfast, that is. Anything with slow release carbs is a good thing because it keeps you rolling till lunchtime. Always eat something, though, because you've gone all night with no food and skipping breakfast puts your body into starvation mode - so you end up eating more and your body stores it as fat. So always eat something.

For lunch, if the school meals are that dire, I suggest you take a sandwich rather than a cookie. Get some granary bread (which is very nice) and apply lean meat and salady stuff. You can use light mayo as a spread instead of butter, it works better IMHO. And I've no idea what pink milk is, but it sounds like the sort of E-number laden thing you can do without.

For your meal, I'd suggest making it the evening meal, purely because you've more time to dedicate to making it nice. I'm on a healthy diety type thing myself and I've got a few meal ideas which I can share with you, should you so desire to make them.

First one, off the top of my head: Leo's Lamb Casserole. Spud free, just for you, serves two and freezes admirably well. It uses cheaper cuts of lamb, because they cook miles better in a casserole. You won't be using any oil for this one, just the fats from the lamb, so you're cutting out empty calories too.

What you need:
  • Casserole dish - this is dead important! This should be one you can use on the cooker top as well, but if not it doesn't matter too much.
  • Half a pound of lamb shoulder, chopped into chunks. Or a couple of lamb chops, if you prefer.
  • An onion, peeled and chopped
  • Clove of garlic, peeled and crushed, if you're not averse to such things
  • A stick of celery, sliced
  • A couple of carrots, peeled and cut into whatever shape you like. I like them in biggish chunks, otherwise they go too soft.
  • A bit of swede, turnip or parsnip, whichever you prefer, peeled and chopped into chunks
  • About half a pint of stock. Lamb is best, but failing that, chicken or vegetable work just as well
  • A little bit of Rosemary - fresh or dried, either will do, but fresh is better.
  • Salt and pepper
  • Red wine vinegar, or Worcestershire sauce, but only if you like rich sauces.
  • An oven!
What to do:
  1. Bob the oven on to about 180 degrees C, which is the same as 350 F or gas mark 5. If it's fan assisted, crank it down about 20 degrees or one gas mark.
  2. Put your casserole dish on the hob, heat it up and throw in the lamb. If your dish isn't flameproof then just use a big pan for now. You want to brown off the lamb for a few minutes. Then take the lamb out and put it on one side, but leave in as much of the juicy stuff as you can.
  3. Turn down the heat and throw in the onion, fry for a couple of minutes. Then pop in the garlic and cook the lot for a few more minutes. you want the onions soft rather than brown, ideally.
  4. Now chuck in the other veggies and fry them off for about 5 minutes or so. Again you're aiming for soft rather than charred.
  5. Now put in the lamb on top and mix it all up.
  6. Pour the stock on top. It should be enough to cover the whole lot, but if not then top off with hot water.
  7. Finally, lob in the rosemary and season with the salt and pepper. Add the red wine vinegar or worcestershire sauce at this point too, if you're using it.
  8. Bring it all to the boil. If you're using the casserole dish already, put the lid on it. If not, transfer from the pan to the dish and lid it. Put it in the oven, somewhere in the middle. Leave for an hour.
  9. After an hour, check it's cooked through. It'll be done when the meat is tender. Just don't burn it!
  10. Tip some of it onto a plate and eat it. Have it with couple of slices of bread, if that's your thing.

Freezing the rest of it:
Leave it to cool, put it in a freezable container and pop it in the freezer.
To have it later on, defrost it thoroughly (overnight in the fridge) and warm it through in a pan for 10-15 minutes or zap it in the microwave for three. Make sure it's really hot before you eat it, though.
EvilSpork
Rice is quick and easy and is loaded with good stuff. I use Alton Brown's method, saute the rice for a while in the sauce pan with a healthy oil (grape is nice as is toasted sesame) while you are bringing your water to a boil to brown it slightly and bring out all the yummy nutty tastes. When your water reaches a boil pour it into your sauce pan with the rice. Be careful here because the rice is definitely HOTTER than the water, this results in a pretty explosive and extreme boil. Cover it and reduce the heat to a simmer - it should be done in about 17 minutes, maybe more or maybe less.

From there you can do a lot with the rice. Cook up some veggies in a pan with spices of your choice and add the rice. If you want meat my method is usually to have it precooked and heat it when the veggies are getting cooked, but before you add the rice of course. It will store well in the fridge for a good period of time and can be reheated in a pan again or in the microwave.
elphaba2
Eee! OK, here are some tasty healthy veggie dishes that I like (they can both have meat added though)
Spicy Bean Gumbo-Thing:

you need:
-garlic (clove or two)
-green chili (use half of one)
-onion (1, maybe less--chopped into whatever size bits you like)
-green peppers/red peppers chopped
-a tomato, chopped.
-can of black beans/red beans/things
-can chickpeas
-spinach or kale or something else to vit A/iron you up
-cayenne pepper
-salt
-cumin
-lime juice
-turmeric/curry powder
-cup or two or water or broth

Heat a large-ish skillet on medium heat with a bit of olive oil in (about a tablespoon--you don't want too much). Chop up the garlic and green chili in little bits while it heats, once a drop of water dances, dump in the garlic and chili and let them fry for a minute or two. You don't want the garlic burning but toasty brown-colored garlic can be nice. Dump in the peppers and onions and cook these until they're as soft/firm as you'd like. Careful not to over-sautee, because then they'll be slimy in your gumbo. This is also a good point to add some of the spices--try a teaspoon each of the cumin, turmeric/curry powder and the lime juice to start. Add more of the things that you like later, when you've got liquid in. Put in a very small amount of the cayenne to start. Turn off heat. Pull out a big pot.

Bung in the contents of the frying pan, then add the black beans, chickpeas and the tomato. Turn the heat way down and let these simmer for a few minutes. Add more of the spices now, if you so desire. Next, add the water or broth and chopped spinach or kale. These will float to the top--don't get freaked out. The more, the better.

Let this cook until hot and delicious.


[Will add other recipe in a bit--I'm bouncing out for the afternoon]
Phyllis
QUOTE (leopold @ Dec 3 2008, 03:57 PM) *
For lunch, if the school meals are that dire, I suggest you take a sandwich rather than a cookie. Get some granary bread (which is very nice) and apply lean meat and salady stuff. You can use light mayo as a spread instead of butter, it works better IMHO. And I've no idea what pink milk is, but it sounds like the sort of E-number laden thing you can do without.

I don't think it'd occur to many people in the US to put butter on a sandwich. My reaction to finding butter on sandwiches here was basically this: blink.gif

I think pink milk is strawberry flavored? I'm not sure. I never liked it.

I really like light hummus on sandwiches. You could also get some tortillas and do some wraps if you get sick of sandwiches for lunch. Just throw in some vegetables like baby spinach (it's better for you than iceberg lettuce), bell peppers, onions, mushrooms, and tomatoes. Add salsa if you like spicy food, hummus if you don't. Ooh, or you could take cut up veggies and some hummus in a little tupperware container and dip the veggies in the hummus.

...what hummus obsession? I do not know what you are talking about. ph34r.gif
EvilSpork
QUOTE (candice @ Dec 3 2008, 03:42 PM) *
QUOTE (leopold @ Dec 3 2008, 03:57 PM) *
For lunch, if the school meals are that dire, I suggest you take a sandwich rather than a cookie. Get some granary bread (which is very nice) and apply lean meat and salady stuff. You can use light mayo as a spread instead of butter, it works better IMHO. And I've no idea what pink milk is, but it sounds like the sort of E-number laden thing you can do without.

I don't think it'd occur to many people in the US to put butter on a sandwich. My reaction to finding butter on sandwiches here was basically this: blink.gif

I think pink milk is strawberry flavored? I'm not sure. I never liked it.

I really like light hummus on sandwiches. You could also get some tortillas and do some wraps if you get sick of sandwiches for lunch. Just throw in some vegetables like baby spinach (it's better for you than iceberg lettuce), bell peppers, onions, mushrooms, and tomatoes. Add salsa if you like spicy food, hummus if you don't. Ooh, or you could take cut up veggies and some hummus in a little tupperware container and dip the veggies in the hummus.

...what hummus obsession? I do not know what you are talking about. ph34r.gif


blink.gif to YOU candeeese! Butter on sandwiches is lovely.

The secret is out! I'm horrible when it comes to eating healthy.

Mmmmm peanut butter and bacon ph34r.gif
Yannick
Okay, shopping list time. I hate these.

I called my mom earlier and told her to bring home some lamb. She was confused, but don't care.

Had some awesome spinach/mushroom pizza tonight.

So, I'll try out these this week. Thanks guys. biggrin.gif
Yannick
QUOTE (EvilSpoon @ Dec 3 2008, 06:17 PM) *
Mmmmm peanut butter and bacon ph34r.gif

At the same time? blink.gif

I dipped one of my carrots in someones peanut butter today. There was a weird pause. Followed by "Dude, I swear I thought it was an apple."
elphaba2
Oh, and I forgot--you can put leftover rice or rice that went wrong in gumbo as well--it's especially good with brown rice that has gone crunchity, because it swells up and adds complex carbs to an already healthy dish.

OK. Salad! It's really good if you like a lot of stuff in salad, and any of the vegetables/fruits can be substitutes for whatever you've got. My favorite version is with blueberries, spinach/kale and celery. You can also put the dressed salad in a pita for a super-awesome wrap.

Delightful Salad
-Some romaine lettuce
-Some spinach (baby or regular, don't matter)
-clementines or blueberries or strawberries (all are vitaminy and great, and relatively low-sugar for fruit)
-celery
-green peppers
-your favorite kind of nut (slivered almonds work really well imo)
-balsamic vinegar
-sesame oil
-olive oil
-salt/pepper
-grainy mustard
-herby chicken if you like chicken (recipe below)

OK. Very easy. Stick all the vegetables (washed, chopped into your favorite size) into a bowl. Works well with Tupperware if you're going to bring it to school. Toast the nuts for a few minutes in the oven (or toaster oven if you've got one) until they're a light brown. Nom nom. Use a fork to whisk the dressing ingredients (I've never measured, but a good rule of thumb is vinegar > oil > grainy mustard. Use only a tiny tiny tiny amount of sesame oil (1/4 tsp) for flavor. Don't over-olive-oil it or it will be gross. Add salt and pepper to your dressing to taste, and maybe even a bit of sugar. If you're eating it right then, dump dressing on salad. If not, take it in a separate Tupperware and shake it up before dumping on your salad. You will be the coolest kid.

Herby Chicken
-boneless, skinless chicken breast (it'll probably make two servings' worth, but this stuff is easily fridged.) cut into strips
-kitchen herbs (I use a couple blends--one of which is marjoram, oregano and lemon peel, and one of which is called Herbes Du Provence and is the devil's creation in that it is so good. Checking the label now. In order of abundance: rosemary, marjoram, thyme, basil, lavender, sage.)
-2 tbsp olive oil
-garlic (bout a clove)
-juice of half a lemon

Chop up the garlic into little bits, brown it in the pan as before. Turn off heat. Take the two tbsp of olive oil, browned garlic, and herbs and dump in a freezer-sized Ziploc. Squeeze the air out, seal and shake until all the chicken is coated. Let this sit in the fridge for a few minutes (10 is good). Heat up a pan with a tiny tiny tiny amount of olive oil in (take some out of the marinade, maybe) until very hot. Dump the chicken in. It should make a very satisfying noise. Cook like this for a few minutes until you start to see the chicken brown, then turn the heat down a little and let it cook thoroughly. Check with a knife (for pinkness in the center = bad) or a kitchen thermometer to see if you've cooked the chicken well enough. Toss on top'yo salad if eating immediately, or let cool and refrigerate.
elphaba2
Oh, and this is a bit weird but--Iz, do you eat with your family at all? I remember that in high school family dinners kept me from being utterly unhealthy, because it was usually protein + veggies + obligatory glass of milk that no one could ever worm their way out of. Even if you weren't hungry, the milk was necessary. Oh, the milk.

(although of course that got me in good habits because dinner no longer tastes like dinner without the milk, and I probably won't get osteoporosis because of this)

Anyway. But yeah. If you don't do dinner con tu madre, maybe ask if a couple times a week you could cook together and have healthy dinner? Might be fun, might not. But either way--you live with her, and if your commitment starts to falter, she'll keep you on track.
Yannick
Umm. I don't really eat with people that often. It's just kind of like, the kitchen's open to everyone whenever they feel like eating. Roger (my almost-step-dad) makes breakfast most days, but I'm not really into the whole bacon + eggs thing, so I just kind of make whatever I feel like having or skip it. And then Mondays - Wednesdays no one's home until well after I've eaten (since I don't eat lunch at school, my lunch/dinner is usually whenever I get home), and Thursdays/Fridays my mom makes stuff. But it's not a "lets sit down in the dining room and eat" thing. It's more like "Grab some when you're hungry, and if you make a mess, clean it up, careful around the computers!" On Weekends, we have dinner together - sort of. It's like "Come to the table, now!", but you can almost always get away with "I'm busy/Not hungry/Whatever."

My grandma totally hates that btw. So it's really funny when she comes over, and we're all trying to convince her that it's okay to eat in the living room. That's why there's a table.

The only real rule there is to eating is no ice cream/pie until after dinner. Which drove me insane Saturday, 'cos I already ate and could care less about the stuff my mom was making.

Oh, and pink milk = strawberry milk = better than any other milk = awesome for dipping cookies in. biggrin.gif
voices_in_my_head
Nuts!
No, seriously. Pretty much any type of nut is awesome for you - they're quick, take no prep-time, and are packed with protein. Personally, I'll grab a handful of walnuts or pecans every once in awhile when I'm in a rush.

My favorite healthy food (that you can make yourself without much fuss, for a quick snack) is peanutbutter and banana sammiches.
I assume you can figure out how to do that on your own but seriously. It's like heaven on bread.

Oh, and wheat bread (or wheat flour, if you're into baking) is where it's at, forget the white stuff. They did a lab test and not even rats would eat white flour - it has no nutrients in it, while wheat flour does. smile.gif
Phyllis
QUOTE (EvilSpoon @ Dec 3 2008, 09:17 PM) *
blink.gif to YOU candeeese! Butter on sandwiches is lovely.

I am not sure you even count as a real American, Mr. Spoon. You like marmite, for goodness sake! tongue.gif

Izzy, do you like olives? I was thinking about my hummus obsession earlier, and I remembered that olives, hummus, roasted red peppers, baby spinach, and onions in a sandwich or wrap is pretty much the best thing ever.

And yes to wheat bread! I like the stuff with seeds in it. I was reading the ingredients on my bread (because that is the kind of exciting thing I do during breakfast), and apparently it is 16% seeds. Awesome. They make satisfying little crunches, and they add protein.

When baking with wheat flour, if you find that the recipes designed for white flour come out feeling a bit too heavy, you can try replacing one cup of wheat flour with one cup of white and mixing them together. It makes it feel a bit lighter, but you still get at least some nutrients from the wheaty stuff. I have yet to find a wheat flour recipe for my bread machine that doesn't create something that I could use as a doorstop or paperweight. dry.gif
leopold
Strawberry milk. Satan's own moo-juice. None of my kids can drink that stuff without getting hyper. It's got as much to do with strawberries as tarmac does. Yuck

You want a proper strawberry flavour drink, full of good stuff and no additives, that's what you want! So here's one: Strawberry and Banana Smoothie. This is dead simple and it's really good cos it fills a gap as well as being completely healthy.

What you need:
  • 100ml (that's about 3 fl oz to you Americans) of low fat natural yogurt.
  • One banana
  • Six or so strawberries
  • Three or four ice cubes - or, if it's cold outside already or you don't have any ice cubes, then 5tbsp cold water will suffice
  • A blender or food processor
What to do:
  1. Peel and slice the banana and put it in the yogurt
  2. Chop the tops off the strawberries and put them in the yogurt
  3. Put the ice cubes or water into the yogurt
  4. Blend the whole blimmin' lot
  5. Pour into a glass
  6. Drink!

You want to use a low fat natural yogurt because it gives a better consistency. If you use normal fat then it becomes too cloying. I don't know if you get this Stateside, but Onken do a great fat-free one which is perfect. Don't be tempted to use fruit yogurt, it won't work the same.

The ice cubes help to cool it and to make it a bit less cloying and more refreshing. Hence the water, if ice cubes are inappropriate or not available.

The banana adds the thickness you need to it. Yes, after unthickening the yogurt! But banana pulp is less cloying than yogurt, plus it's a more filling too. And it tastes nicer!
Yannick
QUOTE (voices_in_my_head @ Dec 4 2008, 02:10 AM) *
My favorite healthy food (that you can make yourself without much fuss, for a quick snack) is peanutbutter and banana sammiches.

Peanut butter, banana, and honey all the way. Best. Sandwich. Ever.

I like the olives with stuff in them.

Grah, bus coming. Will finish this post later.
Mata
Pretty much everything I cook is healthy, mostly because I usually use all fresh ingredients (with the notable exception of tins of tomatoes, which can turn anything into a decent meal).

So, an average meal for one might be something like this:
Half a tin of tuna (mix the other half with a spoon of light mayo and have it in sandwiches the next day)
A large beef tomato (sliced well) or a tin of tomatoes
A small onion (or a few spring onions, or half a large onion)
A clove of garlic
Mushrooms (optional)
Green pepper (optional, for colour and crunch, add near the end of cooking or it'll go too soft)
Dried basil and sage
About a third of a mug of rice.
Dried chillis (optional).
Brocolli (optional)
Courgette (optional... Might be called zuchini in the US?)
A good soy sauce (essential for all decent cooking in my house! I go for Pearl River Bridge Light soy sauce - I find the dark soy sauce too salty and overpowering.)

Get the rice going, this gives you about 15 minutes to cook everything else.
Chop up your onion and crush the garlic and begin frying.
Chop up the pepper but add this later.
When the onion is cooked, add the tomato and tuna.
This is a good point to add in whatever optional veg you want to add, maybe put courgette in a bit earlier, but the timing is up to you - you can't go far wrong really.
Add a sliced dried chilli if you like your food spicy (I find using kitchen scissors is easier than using a knife on dried chillis, they also make cutting the fat off bacon easier, or the manky bits off of chicken).
Mix together well.
After a few minutes add in the herbs, stir in. Take a smell and decide if you want some salt or pepper to it. I usually add a very little bit of salt and quite a lot of pepper for the rich warm taste.
Add the pepper,
Leave on a low heat.
Serve your rice and pile the rest on top. Add soy sauce to taste.

You can add tobasco at the end instead of chillis while cooking.

Alternatively:

Use a couple of sausages, chopped into one inch sections. Stir fry them before you put the onions and rice in.

Chop up a chicken breast and use that instead.

Instead of tomatoes, get a vegetable stock cube, mix one up in about 300ml of water along with crushed garlic and a teaspoon of dijon mustard.

Or, instead of tomatoes, use a small tub of single cream (this isn't such a healthy option, but I find double cream too oily for cooking, and say ya-boo-sucks to all the chefs who think it's nicer) and a small splash of white wine.

Or, use the cream idea and bacon with the fat cut off and cut into small pieces.

Or, use pasta instead of rice!

...

As you can tell, I mix and match with:

meat:
bacon with the fat cut off
chicken
sausages
tuna
cheap white fish (such as pollock)

veg:
onions/spring onions
brocolli (bulks up a meal and is quite cheap)
courgette (see brocolli)
mushrooms (same again)
peppers

sauce:
veg stock based
cream and white wine (lemon juice also works if you're not allowed near the wine or don't have any in the house)
tomato based

basic:
rice
pasta
potatoes

optional extra:
egg (which can be mixed in with pretty much anything, either scrambled in a pan individually and server on the side, or mix in with the veg)

**

Pick one from the meat, two or three from the veg, then a basic. You can't go far wrong!
Moosh
QUOTE (Mata @ Dec 4 2008, 01:42 PM) *
As you can tell, I mix and match with:

meat:
bacon with the fat cut off
chicken
sausages
tuna
cheap white fish (such as pollock)

veg:
onions/spring onions
brocolli (bulks up a meal and is quite cheap)
courgette (see brocolli)
mushrooms (same again)
peppers

sauce:
veg stock based
cream and white wine (lemon juice also works if you're not allowed near the wine or don't have any in the house)
tomato based

basic:
rice
pasta
potatoes

optional extra:
egg (which can be mixed in with pretty much anything, either scrambled in a pan individually and server on the side, or mix in with the veg)

**

Pick one from the meat, two or three from the veg, then a basic. You can't go far wrong!


This is pretty much how I cook, although I use lamb or pork as well as the meats Mata said, and not chicken. Also I'd add noodles to the basics section. And I have been known to use *horror* packet sauces.

Just chop up some meat and a few veg and stick it in a wok. Works every time.
Phyllis
Courgette is indeed called zucchini in the US. It'd be kind of impossible to cut the fat off of US bacon, though. It's almost always streaky bacon. I think the UK kind is called back bacon there? I'm not sure as I don't eat either type.

I find that zucchini can get a bit slimy and gross when sauteed, so I like to slice it up and put it under the grill (broiler in US-speak) for a few minutes on each side.

And ooh, smoothies! I used to take a bunch of frozen berries and throw them in a blender with a bit of orange juice or milk. I am picky and don't like bananas mixed in with other things, and using frozen berries help to give the smoothie a better consistency without using a banana.
leopold
QUOTE (candice @ Dec 4 2008, 03:28 PM) *
It'd be kind of impossible to cut the fat off of US bacon, though. It's almost always streaky bacon. I think the UK kind is called back bacon there? I'm not sure as I don't eat either type.
For those that do indulge in bacon: Smoked back bacon can make a passable substitute for streaky (the smoke imparts a saltier flavour and helps it go crisper) but it's not quite the same. Unsmoked back is different, but is better for making bacon butties with IMHO. You can get streaky in the UK, but it's not so common as in the US.

I've not thought of using frozen berries for smoothies before, that's a damn fine idea Cand smile.gif
Daria
Yay! FOOD! biggrin.gif
I tend to cook like Mata, only without the meat. I am vegetarian (no meat, no fish, no gelatine or fat) and I do pretty well out of veggies and carbs.
Meals tend to go like this:
Carbs: Pasta, noodles, rice or potatoes?
Veggies: What's in the fridge that isn't yet mouldy, but will be soonest?
Add some: ginger/ lemon juice/ nutmeg/ soysauce/ pepper/ herbs/ tinned tomatoes (or all of the above)
Nuts? Got nuts? In go the nuts (usually cashews)

And there you have it! A bowl of something tasty.

EDIT: Almost forgot to say: Hoummus and banana sandwiches are delicious. Like... amazing.
I_am_the_best
Shakshuka is a very quick.

Take vegetables: mushrooms, peppers, onions.
Chop them up small.
Take a couple of eggs and mix them up a bit with a fork in a bowl.
Put them in a frying pan with a little bit of margering and the vegetables.
Mix it about with a wood spoon.
Put some salt and pepper.

It takes maybe 7min?

Some people put in canned tomatoes, tomato paste, paprika... That's disgusting, don't do it.
elphaba2
Ahhh my boy is egyptian and puts piles of hummus on two slices of toast, then adds 2 fat slices of tomato, salt, pepper, cumin and ripped up mint leaves. It is a thing that happens in your mouth and makes you believe in jesus.

See variation: pesto 'stead of hummus, fatty slice of mozzerella, keep the tomatoes in, then add ripped up bits of basil.

Hummus is pretty easy to make yourself, but it takes some time. Also--its usually hard to find tahina (the sesame paste that gives flavor to hummus and falafel) anywhere except specialty food stores or Arabic grocery places. Tho you might find some success at Mrs. Greens/Trader Joe's/Whole Foods-type places. But! If you have a spare Saturday, it's miles cheaper than buying it premade and often very very tasty.
mintyfish
All of these ideas sound delicious. Besides my dire sugar addiction, I'm generally a healthy eater. Sadly, during term time I often can't be bothered with doing up a good meal. But you can still make something good for you pretty quickly! A few of my favourites on the LAZY STUDENT PLAN:

-quinoa: It's rather like couscous/rice but is a whole protein so much healthier. You just boil it up and throw it whatever you've got around: I tend to throw in some diced potato and whatever veg I've got with whatever spices I happen to have or some sauce. It has a nice nutty taste and is quite filling, just be careful to wash it first to get the sour coating off or it will be mingin.

-jacket potato: The potato doesn't deserve its bad reputation! It is filling, full of fibre, and fat-free, so long as you don't load it up with butter and salt. Bake a potato (prick it, wrap in tin foil, throw in oven). Cut it in half, throw in some baked beans (the kind in tomato sauce). Often people will throw grated cheese in, which is yummy but will undercut your healthy objective unless you get some low-fat cheese and use sparingly. Alternatively, throw anything in the potato. Leftovers are ideal. Curries, stews, whatever, it is all filling and fast.

-udon or soba: Another thing with no rules. You can find udon/soba noodles at health food or large grocery stores, and if you get the buckwheat/wheaty kinds they have upwards of 8 grams of protein and fibre. Boil up the udon, then rinse it under cold water. Boil some broth mixed with water, about 1 to 1 (I use veg, but you could use chicken or beef), and add a few tablespoons of soy sauce and some ginger if you've got it. The rest is up to you and depends on what you've got around! Carrot; courgette; cubed tofu, stir-fried or raw; hard-boiled egg, cut into slices; any kind of meat, if you're so inclined; soft boiled egg; stir-fried or steamed bok choy; bean sprout; mushroom; green onion; anything goes, whatever you've got in the crisper is fine. Put the udon in a bowl, pour the broth on top, and throw whatever you've got around over that. Presto! Dinner.
leopold
QUOTE (mintyfish @ Dec 4 2008, 06:18 PM) *
The potato doesn't deserve its bad reputation!
ohmy.gif: Who's been dissing potatoes then? Who are they? I demand to know, so I can give them a swift admonishment with a King Edward!

Potatoes are, without any doubt or fear of redress, the most versatile foodstuff on the planet. Little did Sir Walter Raleigh realise quite what he'd unleashed on the public. You can boil, bake or mash them, you can slice, dice or chip them, you can roast them whole or as wedges, strip them fine and make crisps, you can use them as a thickener for sauces and soups, as toppings for dishes, as sides, as a meal in themselves, as a snack... the possibilities are seemingly endless! You can even choose whether to keep the peel on or off. Potatoes are so versatile, plus they're chock full of vitamins and carbohydrates. Eat more of them!
Mata
I'm not a huge fan of potatoes, mostly through having a mother who cooked them with 98% of my meals for the first 15 years of my life. I'm slowly growing in appreciation for them again - they do taste nice, after all - but I doubt they're ever going to be on my top list of foods.

What are instant noodles like in terms of nutrition? I've always figured that they probably aren't great. I tend to get a load of the 7p Sainsbury's basic noodles then chuck away the flavour pack and use a teaspoon of won ton soup mix from a tub that I buy from Chinese food supermarkets. Very tasty, very very cheap! It's probably reasonably healthy, although possibly a bit high in salt. I usually use about twice as much water as recommended and dip wholemeal bread in the noodle soup. If I'm really hungry I'll put half a tin of tuna (tinned in brine, not vegetable oil) in there, or a tin of mackerel in tomato sauce. Today I sort-of poached an egg in with my noodles and that was very tasty too.

Eggs! Omlettes, eggs and rice, eggs in with noodles, boiled eggs, scrambled eggs on toast. Eggs are very versatile, easy to cook very tasty things with, cheap, almost always in the fridge, and generally a boon to anyone who's looking for food ideas.
Daria
QUOTE (Mata @ Dec 6 2008, 05:24 PM) *
almost always in the fridge

You keep your eggs in the fridge? blink.gif
Yannick
QUOTE (Daria @ Dec 6 2008, 02:33 PM) *
QUOTE (Mata @ Dec 6 2008, 05:24 PM) *
almost always in the fridge

You keep your eggs in the fridge? blink.gif

You mean you don't? blink.gif
mintyfish
QUOTE (Mata @ Dec 6 2008, 05:24 PM) *
What are instant noodles like in terms of nutrition? I've always figured that they probably aren't great.


Depends on whether they're fried or steamed. The instant crunchy noodles are usually fried and thus fatty and packed with preservatives. The kind that come all squooshy in the bag don't really have anything to recommend them in terms of nutritional value but aren't terribly bad for you. On the other hand, if you can get over to an Asian grocery they've usually got varieties that are better for you and don't take any longer to make--if you can decipher the directions...

I concur, I love eggs, and they go in the fridge! Though yesterday the fridge's egg shelf collapsed and splatted all our flat's eggs, which we share commonly like good folk-- except for the eggs belonging to the flatmate who hides his eggs from us in a locked cubbard. Now we have no eggs and he's got his! Karma is clearly broken. dry.gif
Daria
QUOTE (Yannick @ Dec 6 2008, 05:44 PM) *
QUOTE (Daria @ Dec 6 2008, 02:33 PM) *
QUOTE (Mata @ Dec 6 2008, 05:24 PM) *
almost always in the fridge

You keep your eggs in the fridge? blink.gif

You mean you don't? blink.gif

Nope. Never have- they aren't even sold in chiller cabinets in the UK.
Eli
So were do you keep your unhatched chicklings?
Yannick
Hey guys... What happens if you put an egg under a heat lamp?
Moosh
QUOTE (Yannick @ Dec 7 2008, 04:20 AM) *
Hey guys... What happens if you put an egg under a heat lamp?


It gets warm.
Eli
QUOTE (Yannick @ Dec 6 2008, 11:20 PM) *
Hey guys... What happens if you put an egg under a heat lamp?

Well you're not expecting it to hatch are you?
Yannick
QUOTE (Eli @ Dec 7 2008, 03:05 PM) *
QUOTE (Yannick @ Dec 6 2008, 11:20 PM) *
Hey guys... What happens if you put an egg under a heat lamp?

Well you're not expecting it to hatch are you?

I just don't see how they tell the difference from chick eggs and eating eggs.
Eli
QUOTE (Yannick @ Dec 7 2008, 01:10 PM) *
QUOTE (Eli @ Dec 7 2008, 03:05 PM) *
QUOTE (Yannick @ Dec 6 2008, 11:20 PM) *
Hey guys... What happens if you put an egg under a heat lamp?

Well you're not expecting it to hatch are you?

I just don't see how they tell the difference from chick eggs and eating eggs.

Well just putting it out there, but the're arn't 2 different types of eggs. They're all the same..they all come from a chicken. And as to how they can tell, I think it may have something to do with keeping the egg inside a freezer for a good couple of hours. And I know that basically brings up the heat lamp question, so put it this way, if a docter takes a baby from the mothers womb before the acutall birthing process and keep it in a box or room void of all contact, it would die. So you wouldn't expect that giving the baby food and light would bring it back to life, right?
Phyllis
When a mommy chicken and a daddy chicken love one another, they express that love in a very special way. This is how we get baby chickens. When farmers do not want baby chickens, they usually keep the mommy chickens and daddy chickens separated.

Most eggs you will buy in a supermarket are not fertilized.
EvilSpork
Sometimes they slip through though cand...

My mom made brownies once and ever since that batch she cracks her eggs into a container separate from her cooking... An egg that's entirely red inside just screams fertilized.
Yannick
QUOTE (Eli @ Dec 7 2008, 03:52 PM) *
Well just putting it out there, but the're arn't 2 different types of eggs. They're all the same..they all come from a chicken. And as to how they can tell, I think it may have something to do with keeping the egg inside a freezer for a good couple of hours. And I know that basically brings up the heat lamp question, so put it this way, if a docter takes a baby from the mothers womb before the acutall birthing process and keep it in a box or room void of all contact, it would die. So you wouldn't expect that giving the baby food and light would bring it back to life, right?

So.. I googled and found what Candice said. They are different eggs. tongue.gif Well, sort of.

I'm less grossed out at eating eggs now, since... they aren't really unhatched chickens. AND IF THEY ARE, DON'T TELL ME. My grandma totally ruined hot dogs for me.
Phyllis
They are not different eggs. They all come from the same place. The only difference is whether or not they are fertilized. It isn't like the hen whistles to the rooster to come have special adult time because that day she's producing the special baby-chick making eggs. They're all the same.
EvilSpork
And to gross you out a little, of course it isn't an unborn baby chick. It isn't fertilized. All the egg is... Well, it's a chicken period basically.
Yannick
...Thanks so much... for that wonderful mental image...
Daria
QUOTE (EvilSpoon @ Dec 7 2008, 10:02 PM) *
And to gross you out a little, of course it isn't an unborn baby chick. It isn't fertilized. All the egg is... Well, it's a chicken period basically.


You heard it! MENSTRUAL FLUID- DELICIOUS AND NUTRITIOUS
Yannick
Anyone up for some fried period on toast? biggrin.gif
leopold
QUOTE (candice @ Dec 7 2008, 07:47 PM) *
When a mommy chicken and a daddy chicken love one another, they express that love in a very special way.
laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif

Thanks for that, Cand. I needed a good laugh.

Yes, it's possible to get the odd fertilised egg in the supermarket. But I normally crack my eggs into a separate bowl in case I get a bad one. I've never forgotten the time I was baking a sponge cake, using the last of my flour and milk, and cracking the eggs into the mixture - the sixth and last egg was bad and ruined the whole mix sad.gif

Eggs are a great way to get nutrients and proteins and are generally healthy as long as you don't fry them in oil. Also, watch out for your cholesterol levels, too many can be bad for you that way. And watch out for becoming "egg-bound". It's like concrete mix for intestines, is egg...
Mata
Red wine is good in moderation, eggs are good in moderation... Are chips good in moderation? I think they definitely are. I shall also believe that a moderate quantity of cheeseburgers in the weekly diet is part of a balanced nutritional intake. *nods enthusiatically*
Eli
QUOTE (Mata @ Dec 10 2008, 08:48 AM) *
Red wine is good in moderation, eggs are good in moderation... Are chips good in moderation? I think they definitely are. I shall also believe that a moderate quantity of cheeseburgers in the weekly diet is part of a balanced nutritional intake. *nods enthusiatically*

I agree! A..moderate ..intake of cheeseburgers is good for any balanced diet! biggrin.gif
leopold
Yes. But because of all the fat and salt they put into the ones you get from your local fast food emporium, one a week is probably moderate enough. Which is a real shame. So perhaps it's time to wheel out the healthier option which is to ditch the golden arches and make your own from lean mince, dry-fry or grill it and use a small amount of grated cheese. You could have, ooh, four of these a week, I reckon smile.gif
froggle-rock
QUOTE (leopold @ Dec 11 2008, 10:06 AM) *
Yes. But because of all the fat and salt they put into the ones you get from your local fast food emporium, one a week is probably moderate enough. Which is a real shame. So perhaps it's time to wheel out the healthier option which is to ditch the golden arches and make your own from lean mince, dry-fry or grill it and use a small amount of grated cheese. You could have, ooh, four of these a week, I reckon smile.gif


*cries because she misses Georgie-Boi*

Oh the memories, you just bought them all flooding back, Leo. *sniff sniff*
Mata
If I have burgers I usually get them in a pub. I suspect that they're a significant improvement on McD's ones, but I'd be kidding myself if I could think that they were actually healthy!
leopold
Erm, I suspect "significant improvement" is a bit of a stretch. Yep, they may be better, but it depends on where they get them from. If they make them themselves or get them from a farmers market, then yes, you're probably right. Odds are, though, they're bought in from some mass producer and are just as full of crap.
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