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Mata
I've been wondering for a while about people's views on cosmetic surgery. By this I mean surgical procedures for aesthetic reasons, not reconstructive surgery.

I've never really had any issues with it, and would potentially consider having a few things done. I look after myself and exercise to control my figure, but there are some things that there's not a lot you can do about without outside help. I guess it becomes tricky when you start to think about the motives for getting these things done. Some people distort their bodies in ways that aren't healthy for them in the long term. Should a determination to do that be considered a form of self-harm and be treated with counselling, not surgery? At what point does a cosmetic operation stop being a positive thing that can improve a person's self confidence and enjoyment of life and turn into something that is feeding into a lack of self-worth?

Also, where should the line be drawn? Some people would argue that all cosmetic surgery is psychologically a bad idea, but they probably wouldn't object to orthodonistry.

This has come to mind for me because I've been getting irritated by my thinning hair for a few years and have decided to get a hair transplant (it's your own hair, just relocated from parts of your head that don't go bald to the bits that do). It's costly, but it will mean that I can get away with having silly hair for as long as I want. I can't see any good reason not to, other than the generally percieved negative attitude towards cosmetic surgery, and in particular towards men having operations. I've been quite surprised by how positively everyone I've told has reacted, expecting at least a bit of a reaction of 'Really? Why?', but it's all been good. Then again, I've not told my parents and if possible I'm going to avoid letting them know about it! Maybe the attitudes are a generational thing - perhaps the people I've told have all been young enough to be okay with the idea and my suspicions about people's reactions are based on an older generations perceptions of 'what is right for a man to do' (and what isn't).

So, what do you think? Would you have cosmetic surgery? Do you think it's generally useful for people? Do you think and/or feel it's different for men tohave surgery than for women?
leopold
Would I consider cosmetic surgery? Well, yes, I would. I'll consider liposuction as a last resort to reducing my midriff, but considering that carrying excess weight there isn't healthy it's possibly less of a cosmetic and more a health thing. However, I won't do it just to reverse the process of excessive cake consumption, I realise there's more to it than just hoovering up! I'd also thought about redoing my nose. I'd not thought about hair, though, I've already resigned myself to the horror of male pattern baldness!

Do I think it's useful? Yes, with a but. If someone is genuinely unhappy with some part, such as nose, cheekbones, breasts or whatever, and that surgery gives them more confidence and makes them happier, then I'd say it is. The "but" comes when people do it not for confidence, but out of an addiction.

Is it different for men and women? Yes. Societal pressure on women is abominable; it encourages the gender to look in a certain way in such a relentless manner that women are much more pressurised into looking like models. Whereas men don't feel the pressure to look like Brad Pitt, women are definitely made to feel inferior to Angelina Jolie. So for a woman to want surgery is sort of expected. For men to do it, it's seen more as vanity. Which, really, is all wrong; we shouldn't focus on why men want to, and concentrate more on why women feel that they have to. But that's another discussion for another day.

On the point of when it becomes too much, it's a relatively straightforward thing to work out. Anyone having liposuction on a flat stomach, or is on their third boob job, or is having their fifth bout of reconstructive surgery, is likely to be overdoing it. Before any cosmetic procedure, the client should be asked why they want the work doing and assess whether they are in a suitable frame of mind for the work. Any consultant surgeon should be able to identify a definite positive and whether someone is getting obsessed. Unfortunately, some are more likely to just take the cash, rather than consider any mental issues.
Phyllis
I don't think I would consider cosmetic surgery for myself, but that has more to do with my existing medical issues than any real objections to it. It's not a good idea for me to have unnecessary surgery, since being sedentary during the recovery could lead to a blood clot.

While recovering from the hair thing, I presume you wouldn't have to sit around and veg. I'd probably consider it if I was balding, especially as I am a lady. There's a bit more of a stigma attached when we go a little thin on top, though goodness knows it's not easy for men either. Hmm, does laser hair surgery count as "plastic"? I have long been considering that. I am a freaking sasquatch.

I think it can be useful, but of course it isn't always. When it veers into obsession and fixing every little bulge and wrinkle, then it becomes a problem. Counseling would probably be more helpful in such scenarios. I agree completely with Leo on the gender stuff -- very well said.
voices_in_my_head
Would I consider it? Well, currently, and assuming that my current situation stays the same (that is, no disfigurements and whatnot) the answer is no. Not because I believe myself to be perfect in every way, but because I actually enjoy the flaws that I have - my nose is a bit big, I don't like the color of my eyes (is there even a surgery option for that?) and my breasts are pretty small...but I tend to see beauty in different ways than most - looking a little bit unique (that is, not looking like a model/barbie clone) gives people personality.

Useful? Maybe. I think it depends on the person and their own perception of their appearance. Some people feel they can't be themselves looking the way they do, and in that case, I say go for it.

I can't top Leo's response to how it's diffrent for men and women, because I agree completely.
My only real problem with the whole thing is that I think just about anyone is gorgeous, regardless of how much extra flab they have or how big their ears are. Everyone has at least one thing about them that, to me, makes them pretty. But, I'm aware that not all of society thinks that way, and I understand the pressure to look "perfect".
Moosh
I've been thinking about this recently with reference to an area of my shoulders/upper back that's quite heavily scarred. I think I probably will get that cleared up at some point, if I can. It's certainly not medically necessary surgery, and the entire point is to make it look better, but I'm not sure if I think of that in the same way as say, getting a boob job. I don't really have a problem with people having surgery to change their appearance if they're unhappy with it, but if you're going to do it then it's probably a good idea to think about why it is that you're unhappy with it.
CrazyFooIAintGettinOnNoPlane
QUOTE (Mata @ Apr 3 2009, 01:47 PM) *
At what point does a cosmetic operation stop being a positive thing that can improve a person's self confidence and enjoyment of life and turn into something that is feeding into a lack of self-worth?

I think you have a pretty good definition right there of when not to get cosmetic surgery -- but clearly this is going to be different for each person, since someone with with self-esteem problems probably won't feel any better about themselves afterwards.

QUOTE (Mata @ Apr 3 2009, 01:47 PM) *
Also, where should the line be drawn? Some people would argue that all cosmetic surgery is psychologically a bad idea, but they probably wouldn't object to orthodonistry.

I think it's only a bad idea if the person has self-confidence issues before the surgery, and they are hoping it is going to be a quick fix for that. Also, I don't think orthodontistry is a fair comparison here, since it can be done for health reasons as well, e.g. having too many teeth! I get the impression that it is done more for cosmetic reasons in the US though... (is this true?)

QUOTE (Mata @ Apr 3 2009, 01:47 PM) *
This has come to mind for me because I've been getting irritated by my thinning hair for a few years and have decided to get a hair transplant (it's your own hair, just relocated from parts of your head that don't go bald to the bits that do). It's costly, but it will mean that I can get away with having silly hair for as long as I want. I can't see any good reason not to, other than the generally percieved negative attitude towards cosmetic surgery, and in particular towards men having operations. I've been quite surprised by how positively everyone I've told has reacted, expecting at least a bit of a reaction of 'Really? Why?', but it's all been good. Then again, I've not told my parents and if possible I'm going to avoid letting them know about it! Maybe the attitudes are a generational thing - perhaps the people I've told have all been young enough to be okay with the idea and my suspicions about people's reactions are based on an older generations perceptions of 'what is right for a man to do' (and what isn't).

So, what do you think? Would you have cosmetic surgery? Do you think it's generally useful for people? Do you think and/or feel it's different for men tohave surgery than for women?

Tbh I think it's a bit strange but I don't see any problem with it.

I don't think I would ever have cosmetic surgery - while I don't like the way I look very much, there isn't any particular aspect of my appearance that I want to change (with surgery anyway).

I feel like I would be more likely to judge women for having cosmetic surgery than men, which is kind of ridiculous. I kind of associate cosmetic surgery with the ridiculous standards of beauty encouraged by the media, so my gut reaction is to assume all cosmetic surgery is unnecessary. I do realize that there can be legitimate reasons for doing it though, and I certainly don't think that it is always a bad idea.

QUOTE (leopold @ Apr 3 2009, 02:27 PM) *
On the point of when it becomes too much, it's a relatively straightforward thing to work out. Anyone having liposuction on a flat stomach, or is on their third boob job, or is having their fifth bout of reconstructive surgery, is likely to be overdoing it. Before any cosmetic procedure, the client should be asked why they want the work doing and assess whether they are in a suitable frame of mind for the work. Any consultant surgeon should be able to identify a definite positive and whether someone is getting obsessed. Unfortunately, some are more likely to just take the cash, rather than consider any mental issues.

That doesn't sound very straightforward to me! How do you assess the client's frame of mind? Whats to stop them just going somewhere else if they are refused?

QUOTE (voices_in_my_head @ Apr 3 2009, 11:51 PM) *
My only real problem with the whole thing is that I think just about anyone is gorgeous, regardless of how much extra flab they have or how big their ears are. Everyone has at least one thing about them that, to me, makes them pretty. But, I'm aware that not all of society thinks that way, and I understand the pressure to look "perfect".

I agree with you to a point; little imperfections can sometimes be cute and there is no one standard of beauty that everyone should want to look like. On the other hand, there are certain things which clearly make people look more attractive, such as facial symmetry, and I think it is unrealistic to say that everyone is beautiful in their own way (unless you mean gorgeous to include other traits besides physical appearance, in which case just ignore this!)
voices_in_my_head
Crazymat - Yeah, That's what I meant. My standards of beauty depend largely on the person's personality. For example, A person can have all of the traits I find attractive, but if they have a bad personality, I'm likely to find something ugly about them anyway. the opposite is also true. (A person can be classically "ugly" but still appear pretty to me, due to them having a great personality.)
leopold
QUOTE (crazymat @ Apr 4 2009, 02:48 PM) *
QUOTE (leopold @ Apr 3 2009, 02:27 PM) *
On the point of when it becomes too much, it's a relatively straightforward thing to work out. Anyone having liposuction on a flat stomach, or is on their third boob job, or is having their fifth bout of reconstructive surgery, is likely to be overdoing it. Before any cosmetic procedure, the client should be asked why they want the work doing and assess whether they are in a suitable frame of mind for the work. Any consultant surgeon should be able to identify a definite positive and whether someone is getting obsessed. Unfortunately, some are more likely to just take the cash, rather than consider any mental issues.

That doesn't sound very straightforward to me! How do you assess the client's frame of mind? Whats to stop them just going somewhere else if they are refused?

It's straightforward to tell if someone's overdoing it if they are having the same procedure on the same body part more than a couple of times. I'm sure there's medical records for such procedures, at least! For example, has Michael Jackson had too much rhinoplasty? Did Lolo Ferrari have too many boob jobs? What about Farrah Fawcett's facelifts? Or Liberace's, for that matter? Even an untrained northern monkey like me can spot those a mile off, so someone with a little training should be able to establish that, yes, three of the same procedure is too many.

As for frame of mind, I agree it's more complicated, but it doesn't need to be hard. If someone with a bent nose or excess facial hair came in, then it's a no-brainer, they are probably mentally fine. If it's a breast augmentation or liposuction, it shouldn't be too much of a leap to discover what the driving force is. In the case of lipo, information on diet would also need to be dispensed. However, if the nose is nice or the body parts in question are reasonably proportioned, then I'd want to establish the mental condition by recommending seeing a psychotherapist or a counsellor. If the person runs off screaming "I'm not a loony!" then chances are they don't need the procedure that badly! Yes, facetious it may be, but it's a reasonable filter. Anyone who then goes on to see the counsellor will then have a report fed back on their mental suitability.

Of course, they could just go somewhere else, because there's no regulation. For every properly qualified practice, there's several Dr. Nick's and some dodgy places in Eastern Europe to turn to instead. Unfortunately, money talks, and if the surgeon doesn't have any qualms about taking your money, he isn't going to bother himself to find out if you're in the best frame of mind to undergo the surgery.
Mata
That's the problem with regulation of that kind of thing: cosmetic surgery is most often for non-medical reasons, and in that capacity it's a service industry. Nose-job to go? You got it.
Daria
Mass update on lots of posts.
Anyway:
I don't agree with cosmetic surgery for "beauty" reasons. It encourages the idea that there's a perfect human shape people should be aiming for, whether that be thin, curvaceous, hairy, hairless, pouty, or whatever. However, if someone feels incredibly upset with their body, then they should be allowed to inject as much poison, break as many bones or suck out as much fat as they wish. There should be more attention paid to the reasons why they are doing it- counselling should come as standard. And it shouldn't be advertised- like cigarettes. I'm sick of seeing adverts for lunchtime boobjobs on the tube.
elphaba2
It makes me sad that basically every male I know dispenses high-fives like crazy every time boob jobs are brought up. Despite the fact that I know these dudes to be kind, caring, liberal--supportive of women's rights, would never ever tell a girl she was anything other than perfect (and honestly mean it)--they still automatically perk up (yes, pun intended) when new tits are mentioned. Which always leaves me in 'what te fuuuaaaaaagggghh' mode.

Grah, you suck societal pressure.
Daria
You should carry round flashcards with pictures of "gone wrong" surgery. You know the kind, the ones you get in trashy magazines about I GOT A TUMMY TUCK IN A SEEDY BACKSTREET SURGERY WHERE THE SURGEON COULDN'T SPEAK ENGLISH AND DIDN'T WEAR GLOVES, AND NOW I'M SURPRISED THAT I HAVE AN INFECTION stories. It probably won't stop them from being jerks, but they might feel a bit grossed out for a while.
Mata
So, in eight hours, I'm getting 2000 tiny little holes in my head. Eek!
froggle-rock
Can I name one?
Mata
If you want. I think there are enough that everyone could name one.
froggle-rock
Sweet. I shall name it Sophia.

hope it goes well, mister wink.gif
Pikasyuu
I want to name mine Jack Dawson. This is a good idea. smile.gif
Yannick
Ooh, I'm naming mine Nathanial.
Mata
Pick again! An ex had a pet rat called Nathaniel, so I'm vetoing that one!
believe
I hope the 2000 tiny holes surgery goes well. ph34r.gif
Yannick
QUOTE (Mata @ May 20 2009, 12:56 AM) *
Pick again! An ex had a pet rat called Nathaniel, so I'm vetoing that one!

sad.gif Nathan? Daniel? Nate?
leopold
2000 holes? You could half fill the Albert Hall with them wink.gif

I want to call one of the holes a name, but I'm struggling a bit... Percy? Nah. Derek? No, that's more a pigeon name. Eric... Albert... Heston... no, no, no. Ooh! I know! Herbert, in honour of my old cat.
Moosh
Well, if my adding up is right you've had it done by now. Hope it went well.

Also, I'm naming one Fergus.
EvilSpork
Bernard. That is all.
mooooooooooopo
I have decided upon Walter. smile.gif
Mata
Any other version of Nathaniel is acceptable smile.gif

Thanks for the good wishes, it is indeed all done now. Two things are prominent in my mind:
The surgery is a breeze.
My head now hurts like someone just cut it 1500 times.

Oh my frickin' gods, it really hurts now.

So, what happens? (Apologies for typos and any other carp like that, I'm on rather a lot of pain killers.)
They tape up the hair in the 'donor area'. This basically means the back of your head. They take hairs from thre because (for some reason those ones are immune to DHT, the chemical that cause hair loss).
They anaethetise the donor area This involves 8 injections which are pretty sore, followed by about ten minutes of further injections which you stop feeling after the first five minutes.
They shave a strip in the donor area.
They cut off a strip of the scalp. It's about 15-18cm long, I guess, and about 1.5cm wide. I caught this being removed in my peripheral vision. It looked like a long hairy worm! It was awesome. I asked if I could see it better but it had already been whisked off to be worked on. Apparently most people don't want to see it because they think it's revolting, personally I figure that I'm never going to get the chance to see the back of my head with my own eyes again. Still, I caught a glimpse of the long hairy worm, and that was pretty cool.
The strip of skin goes to a group of nurses to split up into follicles. These are grouped depending on how many hairs are coming out of the follicles (many follicles have between one and three hairs growing out of them).
While the nurses do that, the doctor sews up the cut area.
The doc then injects the graft areas with adrenyline. This makes the skin swell a bit, which makes it easier to graft into clear areas between the existing hairs.
The doc then makes lots of tiny cuts in the scalp. By this point you've been in surgery for a good 45 minutes or more.
This cutting takes over an hour, I'd guess (no clocks). He counts 1500 cuts (more might be added later if needed) spreading them over the areas that they are most needed in. He makes the cuts at the correct angles to get the grafted hairs to blend naturally with the existing hair.
Each of the cuts is very short on the surface, but about 7.5mm deep. When the anaesthetic wears off, this really frigging hurts. The donor area removal hurts and bleeds, but it's all the tiny cuts that really give the stonking headache something to work with.
After couple of hours, the donor area has been split into individual follicles and the cuts have all been made. They clean you up then the nurses get to work individually pushing all the follicles into the tiny cuts. I had three nurses working on my head, but could only see two. The third one was behind me and I couldn't feel her doing anything at all except when she dabbed away some blood and that made my head wobble. For all I knew, she could have been stapling a carpet to my head and I wouldn't have felt it.
That takes about two-three hours. It's pretty dull, but weirdly relaxing.
Overall, the procedure took between four and five hours. It all went very smoothly.

So, next up... All the grafted hairs will fall out! In about three weeks it'll look like I've not had anything done! In 3-6 months the new hairs start growing properly and I'll see the results. There are potential complications, but they're too dull to recount. The most likely seems to be swelling in the head. I guess we'll see over the next few days.

My main issue now is that I have no idea how I'm going to fall asleep. On the back of my head I've got a huge stitched gash and on the sides and top I've got a load of scabby stubble. I'm considering two options: making a doughnut with a towel and sleeping face down, or just staying awake for the next 24 hours! The grafts will be a lot less sensitive in a day and it'll be much easier to sleep with them. For the moment I've got no idea what to do. I'm really tired because I've been excited about this for the last couple of nights, but now I'm exausted but can't sleep without expecting to get blood everywhere. Tricky.

I believe I mentioned that it also hurts a lot. You've heard of the Chinese torture 'death by one thousand cuts'? That's for wimps.
Yannick
The third nurse was totally implanting a brain control device. wink.gif
froggle-rock
QUOTE (Mata @ May 21 2009, 01:01 AM) *
There are potential complications, but they're too dull to recount. The most likely seems to be swelling in the head. I guess we'll see over the next few days.


*giggles* Suuuuuuuuure.
Phyllis
For sleeping you could try laying on your stomach and resting your face on your hands instead of a pillow. That's how I usually end up by the time morning rolls around, and I think it'd be very effective if I wanted to avoid sleeping on my hair!

Also, I am naming mine Hortense Branwen McGillicuddy.
Mata
I can't really sleep on my front because I have to keep my head elevated. I tried it but it meant my back was permanently arched. I did end up sleeping on my hand though, it gave me enough support to stop things getting rubbed.

It hurts a lot less today. The small cuts aren't nearly as sore, as they were. It's just the stitched slash across the back of my head that really hurts now. From cautious feeling, I've discovered it runs all the way around from above my ears! It's huge!
leopold
Blimey! If that's the price of vanity, I think I'll just let nature take it's course and put up with male pattern baldness...
Mata
It's the price of vanity, but it's also the price of feeling happier with the way I look, being able to have more fun with my look for the rest of my life, and also it's a really interesting expierence! I'm really looking forward to it clearing up then starting to grow properly in a few months. I can take a few days discomfort for a lifetime of benefits.

You could say that doing the PhD was vanity - I had no need to do it, and they don't usually contribute to your overall success in life. In some quite significant ways, I did it because I thought it would be cool to be able to say I'd done it. That's pretty vain!

Most things I do in life are done because I want to experience them, but partly it's also because I think they're interesting and make me more interesting for having done them. They give me perspective and help me answer questions about myself. I'd always wondered whether I would ever have cosmetic surgery, it turns out the answer is yes.
leopold
Which is fair enough. There's nothing wrong with wanting to experience life to the full, and there's definitely nothing wrong with wanting to be happy.

No, the price for me is that I'm just too damn squeamish to go through that. I read the description through my fingers, imagine how I'd go on actually going through with it! Seriously, I'm so bad I put off a hernia operation for over 2 years, just because the thought of having an op made me feel physically sick. I had to have it done in the end because it was on the brink of becoming more serious and it hurt too much to ignore it. If I'm going to balk at having necessary surgery, I think I'll be more likely to try wearing hats smile.gif
Mata
biggrin.gif I see!

So, you know how it's really hard to resist picking a small scab, even when you know you shouldn't? And how it itches a bit? I've got 1,500 of them on my head. Yearrgh! That's not to mention the huge donor area one. So far I've not so much as scratched any of them, but I really hope that they drop off soon - I think they're nearly ready to go, but I'm back at work on Wednesday and I'd rather be back to having a more normal looking scalp by then!
Daria
I think we need gross-out pictures.
Mata
Fair enough, why not?

Warning: BLOOD!

This is from the day of surgery: http://www.matazone.co.uk/hair/Hair-May-23rd-2009-002.jpg
The hair is pretty matted from my blood still! You can just make out the line of the donor area along the lower part of the picture.

The flash always makes balding areas look far worse than they do in normal lighting conditions, but even with that taken into account it's a bit startling to see how little hair I've got/had back there.

This is the view tonight: http://www.matazone.co.uk/hair/Hair-May-23rd-2009-006.jpg
As you can see, there is a lot less redness. It's clear that there is going to be a lot more hair back there when this grows through. Every one of those red dots is a little scab - it's so annoying!

This is the donor area scar tonight: http://www.matazone.co.uk/hair/Hair-May-23rd-2009-007.jpg
It's healing up okay but really itches! Sorry, for some reason it's really hard to get a decent photo of it.

Here's the work at the front: http://www.matazone.co.uk/hair/Hair-May-23rd-2009-005.jpg
There's a little bit of extra work added onto the temples, which had pretty much disappeared, but mostly the doctor focussed on strengthening the existing hairline. Again, lots of scabs and lots of itching! You can also see that there is some bruising and swelling. This doesn't always happen, but it does get a fair number of people, so my forehead is a little swollen at the moment.

What happens next:
2-3 weeks - all the transplants fall out, and it looks just the same as it did before the surgery.
I also begin taking a drug that blocks 90% of DHT (a hormone derived from testosterone). This will thicken the existing hair, prevent more from falling out, and strengthen the transplanted hairs. This takes about 6 months to take effect. It's one pill every two days... Pretty much for the next 10-12 years. By that point the testosterone levels should have dropped enough that the hair loss wouldn't be a problem.
3-6 months - the new hair begins to grow through properly.

So, by this time in November I should have a pretty decent head of hair again. Mohawk a-go-go!

Right now though I just have to resist scrratching it. Aaargh!
Daria
Awesome. To be honest, it doesn't look as gross as I thought it would! I can see how it would hurt/ itch a hell of a lot, though.
How will taking the medication affect the rest of your body? Will you suddenly sprout massive bushy eyebrows and ear hair?
Mata
No, it doesn't work like that. It blocks the creation of DHT, which is a hormone that some hairs are sensitive to. Basically the hairs on the back and side of the head aren't sensitive to it, the ones on the top are. When exposed to DHT, the hairs on the top of the head thin and eventually fall out/stop growing completely. It's not going to make new hairs grow, it just prevents the old ones from stopping growing.
Daria
Ahh, I see! And yeah, I didn't think it would make new hairs grow- the bushyness was a reference to the idea that the old hairs would stay, and new ones would still grow at the same rate they always did. Yay for hair!
Mata
If this proves anything, it's that God exists. Let's face it, it would be fine to go bald on the back and sides but keep the top, and the opposite happens. Also, the same thing that is making the hair on top fall out is the same base hormone trigger that makes hairs grow on backs, in noses, in ears... If that's not evidence that there's a deity out there with a really annoying sense of humour then I don't know what is!

I did use a lotion called minoxidil for nearly a year. That one can stimulate old follicles to start growing again, and potentially could cause weird hair growth but you'd have to rub it in the weird place twice a day for six months before you saw any results!
Mata
I can't stop picking at the scabs! Stop me before I pick again! Yeargh!

On the plus side, they're falling off okay.
Mata
Hooray! After an hour in the bath today, very gently rubbing my head, pretty much all the scabs are gone, leaving only the big load of stitches on the back of my head.

So, six days after surgery I've got:
loads of stubbly hair (which will probably all fall out in the next week or two)
pinky/red skin in the areas around the stubble
lots of stitches that itch like crazy around the back of my head
bruising around my temples.

All in all, it's going pretty well. My scalp is still sore, but it's an enormous amount better than it was a couple of days ago. Even seeing the stubbly version of the final effect it looks like it's going to be a good result. Yay! Cosmetic surgery win!
leopold
Wow, all those cuts *shudders*

I'm glad you're happy with it, Mata. But I'm still in the "rather you than me" camp.
Mata
It's mostly healed up now. The skin around the grafts is mostly sealed up with a little redness and dryness, but otherwise it's totally back to normal.

The stitches are the real pain now, but I'll probably take those out tonight. It's 8 days after the surgery now, and the discomfort is mostly in the past. For an uncomfortable week I get a lifetime of hair in return. I can handle that exchange smile.gif
Phyllis
Mata: STOP SCRATCHING THE SCAR!

biggrin.gif

Everyone else: I got to see Mata's donor area scar in person. Jealous?
Yannick
Only if you got to poke it. tongue.gif
Phyllis
No, I didn't poke it. That would be setting a bad example, since Mata is not supposed to be fiddling with it!

Plus, ewww, it's someone else's bloody scar, man. It's healing and all, but it still looks pretty fresh. I like Mata, but I don't want to touch his wounds. Well, unless he's in danger of bleeding to death and I'm trying to make it stop until an ambulance arrives. Then I'd make an exception. tongue.gif
Mata
It's not that bad (says the man who can't see it with his own eyes). Anyway, I'm not really scratching, it's more like 'rubbing' at loose bits...

It's so much better now the stitches are out!
craziness
What really concerns me about cosmetic surgery is what people are willing to do to their bodies to look good. I have no issue with something like hair transplants or dentistry, as such things seem minimally invasive. But people really going under the knife and dramatically altering their appearances, it just doesn't sit well with me. I have considered getting a breast reduction (I have a 34 DDD bra) but have decided against it because I simply feel that it isn't worth it to go under the knife, deal with anesthesia, heal for a month, etc etc all in the name of wanting to fit into cuter bathing suit tops. If my size causes me a lot of back problems down the line, I would consider it when I'm much older, but for now I would not do it. Go for the hair transplants, theres no harm in a little vanity as long as you don't go completely overboard and turn into Michael Jackson
froggle-rock
Hrmmm. I reckon I'd nipple realignment surgery if in twenty years time my nipps point south. South, south- I can't see them and they are just like 'hai toes'. It is only cosmetic. For me, just don't like how it looks. I could put on shed loads of weight and have even bigger mulungas, and kind like Craziness is saying if those mulungas caused me back pain or whatever I'd consider a reduction. But if those nipples stop staring back at me in the mirror, I'm pretty sure I will be spending cash to get 'em looking at me again.

So, on the one hand, yeah Mata, you might be being a bit of a tart, but on the other hand *shrug*. Pot. Kettle. It would just make me feel more comfortable with my body.
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