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I_am_the_best
This isn't too much a concern, I was just wondering....

Do people still get frightened at night, even as adults?

I mean, I'm 19.... and still have trouble convincing myself to turn of the ligts before I sleep, and sometimes I sleep with the lights totally on. I don't really go home anymore because I get too scared sleeping in my house. Last time I was there I almost went and asked to sleep in my parents' bed, haha! (I never used to be this scared when I lived there... odd!) And I only sleep when I'm feeling so tired that I can fall asleep in about a minute, so that I don't have to lie awake and hear creaks and having my imaginaton go crazy.

I've always wanted to keep my mind young, but not this young, please!

Anyway, I'm not too fussed, just interested... do adults keep this scary night imagination? smile.gif

Oh wait, I'll make it a poll. I hope that' worked.
Phyllis
I'm going to go with no.

I get a bit spooked now and then, if I somehow get tricked into watching a scary movie (I'm a wimp — can't handle them!) or I hear a noise downstairs, but nowhere near the level of fear you're describing, and certainly not on a regular basis.
Hobbes
Hmm...

I haven't chosen to vote, as yet, because I'm not sure what to go for.

Like our beloved Candice/Phyllis above, I am don't suffer with the kind of fear you describe. So, with that in mind, a "no" would be appropriate.

BUT... I don't think 19 is "too old" for you to be having fears of the night/dark. From the little I know, it's a fairly common fear - particularly amongst women - that often only starts to dissipate once the individual begins to live with someone in a relationship. i.e.... and I don't want this to sound like I'm suggesting some kind of "weakness" in women, or anything similar, but the notion is that the 'partner' become a protector, of sorts, and thus a fear at night is reduced because their other half is looking out for them.

Does that makse sense?

So, in that regard, 'Yes' would be suitable for the question: "Do people still get frightened at night, even as adults?"
But, 'No' for the question: "Do you (me) get frightened....?"

I think it becomes much more of a problem when the fear continues to exist, or escalate, as you get older. These kinds of things can become more and more irrational so, although being 19 and worried about the dark isn't overly worrysome, it might be something you'll wanna start thinking about combating.

Maybe begin asking yourself why you have this fear? Is it as simple as a fear of the dark itself, or a fear of something specific that might be "hiding" in the dark, or something specific that might happen?
LoLo
I put no, but then I was never quite bothered by the night. When I was a young teenager I even started sneaking out in the middle of the night to walk around town. I grew up in an old creaky house too, so if a house isn't making strange noises at night, it just doesn't feel right.
snooodlysnoosnoosnoodle
What Hobbes said is very true in my case, for my whole life I have never really slept very well alone but now, living with Paul I actually sleep quite well.

When living with my parents I did not sleep well, some nights I would have to spend hours just filling my mind with "safe" images before I could fall asleep and I had to have the duvet over my ears at all times. When I moved out I lived alone in a reasonably sized house for 2 years and once it got dark I would have to shut my bedroom door and would only leave when my bladder could not hold on for any longer, I also rarely opened the curtains (even in the middle of the day) for fear of what was on the other side. Following that I lived in halls for two years where every little noise would wake me up but I was generally able to get to sleep reasonably well, knowing that there were plenty of other people in the building.
Now living with Paul I manage to sleep quite well although I still have the odd night where I cannot get to sleep or I wake up in the middle of the night afraid for no apparent reason. If Paul is not here or I am back at my parent's I revert straight back to lying awake convincing myself I am safe before I will be able to sleep.

Anyway, I voted yes, because I do.
Lurker in the Park
Hmm, pass. That said I don't think it's unusual if there's something odd (creaks, clunks etc.) going on. I had mice in my bedroom in my flat for about 4 months about a year ago and I still find it hard to get to sleep if anything is making noises, which in a 1920s block of flats is a bugger as you can hear what the ground floor back are doing if you listen hard enough. I would say that this wasn't fear so much as hypersensitivity as I had the same problem at my parents where it's very quiet at night. If it's something like this I'd find a set of earplugs you can sleep in cause then you can pretty much hide from the outside world when you're in bed with your eyes shut.

Following on from Hobbes' point about protectors, I did find it easier to sleep if I knew my flatmate was in, not because any 'protector' feelings, just that were two people to deal with something rather than one.

Actually thinking about it, I am twitchy when I'm in on my own after dark, I keep waiting for the burglar behind the shower curtain which is a good trick as we're on the 3rd floor (UK) here. I'm 28.

I'm going to vote a cautious yes on this one I think
Hobbes
QUOTE (Lurker in the Dark @ Nov 28 2010, 05:22 PM) *


No actual text to quote here, because the key is who said it.

Lurker in the Dark.

Quite frankly it seems, to me, that YOU are the person everyone is scared of at night smile.gif
Daria
When I lived by myself, I would convince myself at night that someone lived in the parts of the roof that my flat wasn't in. I also developed an anxiety problem where I couldn't leave my flat sometimes, and although that had nothing to do with just living by myself, it certainly got better when I lived with someone.
Mata
I was a bit jumpy at night after my house had been robbed in Oxford, but that's pretty understandable I think. It was robbed during the afternoon (when any sensible robber would do their work) so the night time issues were really just jumpiness. Other than that, no, I don't have a fear of the dark. The things that keep me awake at night are generally pretty mundane!
Hobbes
I find it too easy to fall asleep for me to have any real issues with the night, I suppose. If I decide I want to sleep, then I usually can. It's been a good ten or fifteen years since I've had anything similar to insomnia. There was a time, about five years ago, when I could be found driving around at 3am... but that was more to do with going to sleep once I'd got home from work, and then being awake in the early hours.

My sister used to call me, "The Incredible Sleeping Man" because I really was quite capable for falling asleep just about anywhere, at anytime, on anything.
Daria
I have been known to go to sleep at gigs because I was bored.
Hobbes
I've fallen asleep during a lecture once. Whilst it was at the local uni it wasn't specifically for students (and I wasn't a student), and so I went out of an interest in the topic. Unfortunately, a combination of tiredness and the most boring lecturer I'd ever heard, made me have to physically struggle to keep my eyes open.

I've only once fallen asleep during a film at the cinema, though. The film was, if I remember rightly, 'The Golden Compass' (or Northern Lights, as the book was known over here). It wasn't awful but missed out so much of the book's wonder, that I obviously lost interest.

And, incidentally, I've just realised that the other two books haven't been made as films yet? Have they decided to not bother?

I often fall asleep watching films at home though... it's almost habitual.
Lurker in the Park
QUOTE (Play-Doh Hobbes @ Nov 28 2010, 06:03 PM) *
Quite frankly it seems, to me, that YOU are the person everyone is scared of at night smile.gif


Does this mean I'm scaring myself? I think it's probable that I am.

</massivelyOffTopic>
Pikasyuu
i don't go half as bonkers at night as i used to, but i'm medicated. so, were i on regular-brain, i probably would. i was super duper pyrophobic as a kid and constantly got up to check the stove, outlets, fire place etc, it didn't matter how many times i already had, i'd do it again and again on top of making my parents and later parent swear up and down that the house wouldn't catch fire and so on. i still do that sometimes, but like i said, if i'm on my meds and everything's all good, i usually sleep with no problems.
vicrawr
A fear of the dark is one of those things we inherited from our ancestors, back before there was electricity everywhere. I just saw a special on it the other night. So being afraid of the dark is in your genes.

I slept with a light on until I was 18. I've only just started sleeping in complete darkness this past year. But I can't do with silence. I have to have noise.
I_am_the_best
Aah, this is very interesting! Thank you all for replying! I never thought that it happened so much to adults because no one ever seems to talk about it, it's nice to know it does. Honestly, although it's irritating if I need an early night, part of me likes being scared because it feels as if I still have some childish imagination there. Hobbes, I see what you mean about it stopping when you start sharing a bed with your partner. Sometimes I imagine that someone else is there too (is this a bit too lonely-hearts? haha) and it helps me sleep. smile.gif
Daria
QUOTE (Play-Doh Hobbes @ Nov 29 2010, 06:53 PM) *
I've fallen asleep during a lecture once. Whilst it was at the local uni it wasn't specifically for students (and I wasn't a student), and so I went out of an interest in the topic. Unfortunately, a combination of tiredness and the most boring lecturer I'd ever heard, made me have to physically struggle to keep my eyes open.


I have done that more than I should admit to >_>
Hobbes
QUOTE (Vicachu @ Nov 30 2010, 04:37 AM) *
A fear of the dark is one of those things we inherited from our ancestors, back before there was electricity everywhere. I just saw a special on it the other night. So being afraid of the dark is in your genes.


* "genes"

Assuming, of course, that you believe in the notion of the collective subconcious. The idea that many of us may share personality/character traits (including fears, phobias, wishes, etc.) because of some form of "inheritance" is part of one helluva debate.

Personally, I'm happier with the theory that the fear of the dark is a form of separation anxiety. It is very rarely present during the first year or two of our life, usually beginning from from around the age of two or three. This coincides with when we are beginning to be aware of our individuality, and that we are a separate entity - a unique person - from those around us. Most children of this age are only ever going to be left alone for a long period when it is bedtime, and much of this is in darkness. So combine the factors and you have: a child, in the dark, alone, and whom is just beginning to understand the very concept of alone'. Chances are, the child is gonna' start to worry.

Therefore, it is often down to how the parents cope with their child's new fear, as to whether this will continue to grow into something of phobic proportions...
LoLo
QUOTE (Vicachu @ Nov 29 2010, 08:37 PM) *
A fear of the dark is one of those things we inherited from our ancestors, back before there was electricity everywhere. I just saw a special on it the other night. So being afraid of the dark is in your genes.

I slept with a light on until I was 18. I've only just started sleeping in complete darkness this past year. But I can't do with silence. I have to have noise.


I can see what you mean. A survival instinct to be aware of our settings at night when predators may be out wanting to have some deep fried human and fries. lol
Sir Psycho Sexy
No, unless I'm in the house alone, then I get a little more on edge for the first few days.
Snugglebum the Destroyer
Yes and no.

I'm not scared of the dark but I don't like the dark.

It gets a bit different when you're older. This evening, case in point - I've crashed out on the couch, mid film, as is my way. Woke at 02:30 ish. And now I just can't sleep. As a result I'm having a good think and getting maudlin. I'm not scared specifically of anything but I'm fretting about lots. It's bloody horrible, actually. I did it last weekend as well and lost my entire Sunday as a result.

In other news - remembered my password. Yay me!
voices_in_my_head
Oh, man.

I'm most certainly not scared of the dark - however, that's not to say that I don't get hella creeped out at night when by myself. What's odd is that when I was a kid up until I was about fifteen, it wasn't a problem for me, and I'd gladly go walking around town at night by myself.

Now, though, I can't stand being outside at night. If, say, there's something out in the car that I have to get after dark, I'll generally be super jumpy while getting it and will have to have a flashlight with me. (I don't know what my logic is there - that a would-be robber will see my flashlight and immeadietly change their mind?)

The later I stay up the worse i am, too - and, naturally, if I'm home alone it amplifies by about five zillion. I'll get up and triple-check that the heater in the garage is unplugged, stove is off, doors are locked, ect. And I totally still do the thing where once I turn the lights off I run and jump into bed. And the whole "check the closet for monsters/other creepy things before going to bed" thing.

I don't think there's anything particuarly weird about it, though. I'm a naturally jumpy/nervous person (with a pretty active imagination) so it's only logical that those things would be exemplified by being alone, it being dark, ect. It's also a fair point that it's constantly covered on everything from TV shows to the newspapers about how horrible things happen at night...so I suppose it's to be expected that you feel the most vurnerable then. Particuarly, as Hobbes said, being a woman - though I don't know if it's really a fact or not, it's also a generally accepted thought that women are more likely to be victims of the spooky sorts of things that are associated with darkness.
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