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Polocrunch
Already read it! That was a great book.

Yeah, I'm always correcting formal writing. People have started coming to me for advice on grammar and stuff. I'm a born grammarian and critic.
gothictheysay
I found myself browsing this thread and decided it needed bumping. Really, it just makes me laugh. tongue.gif

But actually, if it is possible to lodge a complaint I'd like to do so.

The "it's" virus is still around. Say it with me: It's means "it is." IT IS NOT POSSESSIVE. ITS is possessive. Thank you. That is all. biggrin.gif
artist.unknown
Yes, as long as we grammar Nazis are going to terrorise people, why not be doubly annoying and jump on this too? ^^ Hurrah for Stylr.

QUOTE
The "it's" virus is still around. Say it with me: It's means "it is." IT IS NOT POSSESSIVE. ITS is possessive. Thank you. That is all.


Definately, yes, that's a pet peeve of mine too. I will join you in your quest to endlessly pester offenders of this flagrant grammatical abuse if you join me in mine:

"Bad" is not an adverb, and never will be. You cannot "do bad on a test", nothing "smells bad" (in fact, it doesn't smell, it stinks, but one error at a time), and you cannot "want something bad". Ly! The same goes for good and well, unless we have an awfully saintly population that's constantly "doing good", which I seriously doubt. [/rant]
Pab
ermmm .. you sure 'well' should be on that list?
Faerieryn
I am so glad that this thread has been resurrected!!! (they do look better in threes!) I find it incredibly hard to read through posts without checking for punctuation and grammar errors. I know I'm no saint (I learnt all my grammar and punctuation laws instinctively after many years of reading) but there are some things that drive me nuts! The It's and Its thing is one of them as is the amount of times people leave question marks off the end of a sentence when it is a question. This drives me absolutely crazy.
Example: Should I use a question mark here
NO!
SHOULD I USE A QUESTION MARK HERE???????????????????????
Mr Fuzzy
While people are ranting I suppose I should chuck in one of my current favourite peeves. Connecting words. This one is, I must admit, aimed at the American audience.

One hundred ten. NO! One hundred and ten.
I hate when. NO! I hate it when.
A couple people. NO! A couple of people.

/me a splode.
CommieBastard
QUOTE (artist.unknown @ Aug 16 2004, 04:28 PM)
nothing "smells bad"
*


The English language makes an exception in this case: "spicy" is not an adjective, but things can "smell spicy", can't they?
Mr Fuzzy
QUOTE (artist.unknown @ Aug 16 2004, 04:28 PM)
nothing "smells bad"
*


I do. blush.gif I really should stop rotting.
artist.unknown
QUOTE
The English language makes an exception in this case: "spicy" is not an adjective, but things can "smell spicy", can't they?

I stand corrected. In this case, because "bad" is used as a predicate adjective, it is correct, as opposed incorrectly as a adverb like in the other examples. And Pab, I didn't mean you should add ly onto well, I meant that good and well are used incorrectly--ie, "I did good on that exam.", or "I feel good."

QUOTE
I do.  I really should stop rotting.

You should probably look into that. ^^
gothictheysay
Hold on a sec...Spicy isn't an adjective? Or am I overlooking something?
artist.unknown
QUOTE
Hold on a sec...Spicy isn't an adjective? Or am I overlooking something?

Ha, yes, come to think of it, both Commie and I were wrong. Spicy chicken, spicy curry, spicy brains...definately an adjective. ^^;; We're horrible grammar Nazis.
Phyllis
QUOTE (Mr Fuzzy @ Aug 16 2004, 03:45 PM)
One hundred ten. NO! One hundred and ten.
*


Actually, "one hundred ten" is correct. "And" isn't used until you come to a decimal point. 1003.4 is written out as "One thousand three and four tenths." There should be no "and" inserted anywhere before the decimal point. I think it does *sound* better with the "and," but it's not technically correct.
Pab
QUOTE (candice @ Aug 17 2004, 08:29 PM)
QUOTE (Mr Fuzzy @ Aug 16 2004, 03:45 PM)
One hundred ten. NO! One hundred and ten.
*


Actually, "one hundred ten" is correct. "And" isn't used until you come to a decimal point. 1003.4 is written out as "One thousand three and four tenths." There should be no "and" inserted anywhere before the decimal point. I think it does *sound* better with the "and," but it's not technically correct.
*




Okay ... everybody freeze ... Cand: are you authorised to be in here? You got it in writing? No? ... Right , that's it ... You are being deported and sent to a proper English Grammar institution ... 3 years ...
Right guys, wrap'er up and ship'er ... There's nothing to see here folks .. we can all go home now ...
Phyllis
QUOTE (Pab @ Aug 18 2004, 02:14 AM)
Okay ... everybody freeze ... Cand: are you authorised to be in here? You got it in writing? No? ... Right , that's it ... You are being deported and sent to a proper English Grammar institution ... 3 years ...
Right guys, wrap'er up and ship'er ... There's nothing to see here folks .. we can all go home now ...
*

Yes I am authorized to be in here, because I am RIGHT. tongue.gif And you're one to talk about "proper" grammar, Mr. Dotdotdotdotdot!

*Edit* Oho. After Googling, I've found that it would appear the Brits do it differently. Standard American English states that numbers should be written the same way I said, but British English allows for more "ands." I never would have guessed that. Heh. Either way is correct. Which one you use just depends on where you are. It's just like the colour versus color thing.
Polocrunch
*Punches air*

Hooray! My glorious thread has been resurrected.


And just to resurrect a point that has been dead two days and is now in the throes of rigor mortis:

QUOTE
I smell bad.


You mean you aren't a very good smeller? biggrin.gif

Just thought I'd point that one out, even though Commie has already delighted us with his knowledge of "predicative" adjectives.
{Gothic Angel}
Ooooh... I missed this thread. I type properly! happy.gif Like the good little English person I am.
Xkitsurabamix
On FFXI i have to do all lowercase because it's on a PS2 and yes...yes it does bother me to type things out, because everyone else has keyboards and can type stuff out at the speed of light, and i'm stuck here pressing...'X, X, X, R1, X, X, X, X, X, X, X, R1, X, X, X, X, R1, XXX, R1, R1'
It's aggrivating!
Other than that, though, i try to use appropriate grammar.
(Exept for my 'i's' they are always lost in translation...alas...)
Polocrunch
EMERGENCY NOTE TO ALL MEMBERS:

There is a space between the last dot of an ellipsis and the first letter of the following word. This rule does not change!

e.g. "There is no need... for that ellipsis."


Additionally, all ellipsises contain three dots; not one, for that is a full-stop; not two, for that is a colon that has fallen over; but three.


Thankyou for your patronage.
gothictheysay
QUOTE
for that is a colon that has fallen over


*snickers* Oh yes, I am guilty of doing this...but I think it looks better, but now I'll stop.

And I don't know what this ". . ." is, but it's not an ellipsis. Neither is "............................", to my knowledge.
Polocrunch
Those, gothictheysay, are hideous mutants, and must never be allowed to breed.
laenan kite
[quote=(like being a dyslexic six-year-old),
[/quote]


u meen lik dis?u iz insane if you cannae unnerstand me.
roflmfao
Polocrunch
QUOTE (laenan kite @ Oct 10 2004, 04:57 PM)
QUOTE
(like being a dyslexic six-year-old), 



u meen lik dis?u iz insane if you cannae unnerstand me.
roflmfao
*



Guards! Guards! Seize this infidel!


Also, I just want to bring to the attention of all Americans the inherent ridiculousness of their system of punctuation. You dastards put your punctuation inside your quote-marks, even when it makes no sense to do so. Does anyone else agree that this is silly?
laenan kite
QUOTE (Polocrunch @ Oct 10 2004, 06:02 PM)
QUOTE (laenan kite @ Oct 10 2004, 04:57 PM)
QUOTE
(like being a dyslexic six-year-old),



u meen lik dis?u iz insane if you cannae unnerstand me.
roflmfao
*

Also, I just want to bring to the attention of all Americans



im not american!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1
Polocrunch
But you are extremely annoying.

Please improve your language and your posting. It is accepted convention on Matazone that all members should avoid txtspk, Netspeak, 1337 and forms of English other than the standard English of your country of origin. It is also accepted - and enforced - convention that all posts should be relevant to the subject, and not one-liners and other such spam. Please try to keep to these conventions. You risk the invoking the wrath of the Moderators otherwise, and the last person who did that... well, let's just say that they never found the body.
Hobbes
QUOTE (Polocrunch @ Oct 10 2004, 05:02 PM)
You dastards put your punctuation inside your quote-marks, even when it makes no sense to do so. Does anyone else agree that this is silly?
*


How do you mean?
Give an example.
laenan kite
[quote=Polocrunch,Oct 10 2004, 05:02 PM]You dastards
*

[/quote

meenin hoo?
Polocrunch
QUOTE (candice @ Aug 18 2004, 08:32 PM)
Standard American English states that numbers should be written the same way I said, but British English allows for more "ands." I never would have guessed that.  Heh.  Either way is correct.
*


Not picking on you Cand, this is just for use as an example.

See how she placed the quote-marks around the full-stop, even though the 'and' was not part of a full sentence, and thus did not require a full-stop itself? British English would have the full-stop outside the quote-marks.
lygophilia
QUOTE (Polocrunch @ Oct 10 2004, 11:32 AM)
See how she placed the quote-marks around the full-stop, even though the 'and' was not part of a full sentence, and thus did not require a full-stop itself? British English would have the full-stop outside the quote-marks.
*

I always found that a little odd the way we put the periods before the quotation marks when quoting a word or phrase like Candice's.
vicrawr
QUOTE (lygophilia @ Oct 10 2004, 03:48 PM)
QUOTE (Polocrunch @ Oct 10 2004, 11:32 AM)
See how she placed the quote-marks around the full-stop, even though the 'and' was not part of a full sentence, and thus did not require a full-stop itself? British English would have the full-stop outside the quote-marks.
*

I always found that a little odd the way we put the periods before the quotation marks when quoting a word or phrase like Candice's.
*



Also, notice how Polo called "." these full-stops, whereas Lygo called them periods.
Polocrunch
Yeah, there are all sorts of strange names for punctuation marks. Some people used to call question marks 'marks of interrogation'. It sounds rather erotic, doesn't it?
gothictheysay
QUOTE
See how she placed the quote-marks around the full-stop, even though the 'and' was not part of a full sentence, and thus did not require a full-stop itself? British English would have the full-stop outside the quote-marks.


blink.gif Wouldn't we, too? There was a sign that said "Fish for Sale". In that case, the period would definitely not go inside... I think, at least.
Polocrunch
A recent upsurge in the number of spelling mistakes involving plurals and apostrophes has led me to decide to post this, from an Internet guide to good spelling (posted on the NationStates forums, also linked to in Spamwhores Anonymous):

On Apostrophes
The loveable apostrophe (') is used to show possession and to create contractions, where two words are combined into one. Here's some examples:

Contractions:
They would = They'd
He would = He'd
She would = She'd
It would = It'd

They will = They'll
He will = He'll
She will = She'll
It will = It'll

They have = They've
He has = He's
She has = He's
It has = It's

Can not = Can't
Is not = Isn't
Has not = Hasn't
Have not = Haven't
Will not = Won't

It is = It's
It has = It's

Let us = Let's
(not to be confused with the form of the verb "he/she/it lets". It should read "Let's go home. He lets us eat chocolate on weekends."
The contraction of "let us" has the apostrophe, not the third-person singular "he/she/it lets")

Would have = Would've
Could have = Could've

Now, this does not (doesn't) cover all the contraction, but it is (it's) more than enought to get the point across. When typing formally, try to avoid using contractions, but they are perfectly fine inside of character-dialogue.

Possessives
For most nouns, simply adding 's is enough to show possession.

Jacob = Jacob's
Susie = Susie's
Spot = Spot's
Spots (plural of "spot") = Spots'
With the plural noun, the apostrophe came after the s, not before it.

NOTE: Pronouns are different.
He = His
She = Hers
They = Their(s)
It = Its

NOTE: Plurals do not require an apostrophe, simply an extra s. For example:
Cat => Cats
Pigwidgeon => Pigwidgeons
Statue => Statues
God => Gods
Song => Songs
Daria
I wasn't sure if anyone will still come here to see this, but I thought I would post here anyway.
Does anyone else think it odd that 'will not' is abbreviated to 'won't', when the letters are in the wrong order if one takes away the -ill?
And what happened to the good old fashioned double apostrophe-ing?
As in ca'n't
and sha'n't?
It is annoying to read- as I have found when trying to read old copies of Alice In Wonderland- but surely if we are all being grammaticaly correct then we should revive this old rule?

One more question, I promise- what is the maximum number of commas allowed in a sentence?
Moosh
QUOTE (Daria @ Jun 27 2005, 07:22 PM)
And what happened to the good old fashioned double apostrophe-ing?
As in ca'n't
*


Isn't "can't" actually can (n)(o)t? So the apostrophe signifies the two missing letters (n and o)?
Daria
Yes, exactly. As with Shan't- Sha(ll)n(o)t. Does that mean it should have three?
Pab
QUOTE (Daria @ Jun 27 2005, 08:22 PM)
I wasn't sure if anyone will still come here to see this, but I thought I would post here anyway.
Does anyone else think it odd that 'will not' is abbreviated to 'won't', when the letters are in the wrong order if one takes away the -ill?
And what happened to the good old fashioned double apostrophe-ing?
As in ca'n't and sha'n't?


I bet there was a time when people wrote "Willn't" ...

QUOTE (Daria @ Jun 27 2005, 08:22 PM)
One more question, I promise- what is the maximum number of commas allowed in a sentence?
*


How many kisses does it take to get a smile?

(I'm not arguing here, btw. Just spotted 2 points to comment, so I thought I would ... smile.gif )
I_am_the_best
I couldn't help but notice, on the very first post in this thread, 'thank you' has been written without the space inbetween. wink.gif

People used to double apostrophe? I think that it would be pretty hard to re-introduce it because so many people have been taught to write with just the single one and words are understandable enough without.
gothictheysay
What Polocrunch said, only in a slightly meaner way:

artist.unknown
Hehe. I love the comic. I think I may print off twenty and carry them at all times with some tape. Inner stickler, go forth and deface private property! Hurrah!
[\spam]
eleraama
On a related note, this reminds me of "Eats, Shoots, and Leaves" and "The Transitive Vampire: A Handbook of Grammar for the Innocent, the Eager, and the Doomed".

By the way, what is our official position on the Oxford (or 'final') comma, as in 'Cherries, Grapes, Cyanide, and A Small Explosive'?
Greeneyes
I was under the impression that the 'correct' use of the Oxford comma was one of personal preference. It differs between sentences; sometimes the sentence is 'slowing down', and so a final comma seems appropriate, and sometimes the items in the list may contain an 'and' in them, so then it helps clarify the different items. Otherwise it's kinda superfluous.

I sometimes use it.
Forever Unknown
QUOTE (I_am_the_best @ Jun 30 2005, 07:27 PM)
I couldn't help but notice, on the very first post in this thread, 'thank you' has been written without the space inbetween. wink.gif
*


I couldn't help but notice, on the above, that 'inbetween' has been written without the space (or a -) in-between.

Thus I win!

Gah. 'Inbetween' now looks like the strangest word ever.
I_am_the_best
QUOTE (Forever Unknown @ Jul 3 2005, 01:43 PM)
QUOTE (I_am_the_best @ Jun 30 2005, 07:27 PM)
I couldn't help but notice, on the very first post in this thread, 'thank you' has been written without the space inbetween. wink.gif
*


I couldn't help but notice, on the above, that 'inbetween' has been written without the space (or a -) in-between.

Thus I win!

Gah. 'Inbetween' now looks like the strangest word ever.
*



Oops. ph34r.gif But in my weak defence, Microsoft Word doesn't have anything wrong with it. but then and again, that's not saying much. laugh.gif
Forever Unknown
QUOTE (I_am_the_best @ Jul 3 2005, 07:21 PM)
QUOTE (Forever Unknown @ Jul 3 2005, 01:43 PM)
QUOTE (I_am_the_best @ Jun 30 2005, 07:27 PM)
I couldn't help but notice, on the very first post in this thread, 'thank you' has been written without the space inbetween. wink.gif
*


I couldn't help but notice, on the above, that 'inbetween' has been written without the space (or a -) in-between.

Thus I win!

Gah. 'Inbetween' now looks like the strangest word ever.
*



Oops. ph34r.gif But in my weak defence, Microsoft Word doesn't have anything wrong with it. but then and again, that's not saying much. laugh.gif
*




Ahh. My Microsoft says differently. It scolds you! Scolds you nastily with it's wavy red lines.
gothictheysay
QUOTE
Scolds you nastily with it's wavy red lines.


ITS

*weeps* Say something in your defense. Give me an excuse. I know you're a good person.
Forever Unknown
QUOTE (gothictheysay @ Jul 3 2005, 07:56 PM)
QUOTE
Scolds you nastily with it's wavy red lines.


ITS

*weeps* Say something in your defense. Give me an excuse. I know you're a good person.
*



Possessive! Apostrophe!
artist.unknown
QUOTE
Possessive! Apostrophe!

Apostrophe! Contraction!

It's OK, we still love you.
QUOTE
I couldn't help but notice, on the very first post in this thread, 'thank you' has been written without the space inbetween.

I seem to hazily recall that "thank you" varies. It is acceptable to use "thank you", "thank-you", and "thankyou". It's antiquated but technically correct. Methinks.
Greeneyes
QUOTE (Forever Unknown @ Jul 4 2005, 04:30 PM)


err...you do realise that every single one of those links is arguing against you, right? unsure.gif
elphaba2
QUOTE
... but please note that the possessive form of "it" does not take an apostrophe any more than "ours", "yours" or "hers" do
-----the bone is in its mouth


(from the Apostrophe Protection Society)
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