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My;heart;bleeds
I go to the same school as Star_of_lei and i have to agree, Latin is really interesting. However I do find it easier to translate Latin into English than English to Latin - it's easier to find English words in Latin than vice versa!
I would also love to learn Ancient Egyptian. Hieroglyphics fascinate me, and it would be amazing to learn them. I also wouldn't mind learning Ancient Greek either.
Trace
I'm in my fourth year of Latin in school and I really like it. Not only is my teacher old enough to have actually lived when it was a living language (and is a hillarious lady, to boot), we have a great class and we learn so much. And once you get the hang of it, Latin is generally easy to learn because of how English is related to it.

As for Latin pronunciation, we've been taught generall to almost-roll our R's, if that makes any sense, that v is said as a w, ae is aye. However, this might all change when we begin to delve, in the second half of this year, into liturgical and modern Latin.
Rykan
I 'know' Latin and Ancient Greek; I did Latin for 4 years, up until my A levels, I couldn't do the second year because it was just too hard sad.gif I did Ancient Greek GCSE on the side during my A levels though and I thourougly miss my lessons sleep.gif Writting in Ancient Greek was such fun laugh.gif
One of my essays last semester was about ancient languages and I did lots of research into Arabic and Egyptian/Hieroglyphics and things; I've always wanted to learn those languages so centralised it around those two happy.gif
Overfriendly_Kitten
QUOTE (Cath @ Sep 15 2004, 07:09 PM)
How about Ancient Aramayic (sp?) Tee Hee!
Sorry bit of a joke if you ask me seeing as there's no such thing as modern Aramayic yet it's always alway refered to as ancient.
*


Modern Aramaic is spoken by a few million Assyrians living in Iraq, and also throughout the Near East, Europe, North America and Australia.

QUOTE (LadyAllylandra @ Jun 28 2005, 12:13 AM)
Ancient languages are really interesting i have just studied all of this stuff. The oldest written descendant of all the european languages is sansrit which actually comes from somewhere in africa or along that .
*

Sanskrit comes from India and is very similar to modern Hindi.

QUOTE (eleraama @ Jul 3 2005, 04:27 AM)
This is interesting--
Apparently, Modern Hebrew is a combination of two different kinds of Ancient (and Not-So-Ancient) Hebrew. The language is actually based on the written form (only language to do so) of Biblical Hebrew. THe syntax is from what is called 'Mishna' Hebrew that was never actually spoken, just written. Apparently, the Modern Hebrew accent is the Spanish Hebrew one, rather than the Eastern Hebrew.

Way more than you wanted to know, eh?
*

Ancient Hebrew is mainly influenced by Aramaic, one of the root languages of the region. Aramaic lettering influenced Ancient Hewbrew lettering, and the language was at one time spoken as the lingua franca of many Jews throughout the Middle and Near East.
Star_of_Lei
Since I last wrote in this topic my opinions have changed greatly. I respect anyone who does do and like ancient Latin. But honestly, It's as boring as with our teacher. I love languages, but I guess it may only be the ones that are alive. I dislike Latin because I really dislike our teacher, and also, it's not as if it will ever be alive. It is just dead. We don't get to speak it, and speaking it is what makes it alive.
Daria
I wish I could have done latin GCSE- I'm now doing A2 Chem and Bio, and it really would have come in useful biggrin.gif Especialy in taxonomy and isomerism.
exceptional1709
Oh great, I'm going to be doing Chemistry A level and I have never had the chance to learn Latin, although I'd like to have done. I did learn ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs once to the point of being able to translate various common inscriptions on tombs and stuff though.
Pixelgoth
QUOTE (exceptional1709 @ Dec 31 2005, 09:06 PM)
I did learn ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs once to the point of being able to translate various common inscriptions on tombs and stuff though.
*


I did a course in hieroglyphics at Uni. Was fab but I can't remember most of it now.

I'd love to get a few hieroglyphs as a tattoo to remember my Mum but I can't remember structures and don't want to end up with anything stupid. Mind you, it's not like Chinese, where someone can point and say "hey you've got chicken fried rice and not your name tattooed on ya!" laugh.gif
Rykan
QUOTE (Star_of_Lei @ Dec 21 2005, 05:24 PM)
Since I last wrote in this topic my opinions have changed greatly. I respect anyone who does do and like ancient Latin. But honestly, It's as boring as with our teacher. I love languages, but I guess it may only be the ones that are alive. I dislike Latin because I really dislike our teacher, and also, it's not as if it will ever be alive. It is just dead. We don't get to speak it, and speaking it is what makes it alive.
*


Having the right teacher helps. When I first started Latin, I had the most funny, clever awesome teacher ever, which was a real inspiration and made me look forward to every class (hell, I even went into school one day when I was ill because I didn't want to miss my Latin class! Lmao).
I see your point, but it is important to have a good grip on ancient languages for understanding of ancient things and other ancient languages laugh.gif
Daria
QUOTE (exceptional1709 @ Dec 31 2005, 10:06 PM)
Oh great, I'm going to be doing Chemistry A level and I have never had the chance to learn Latin, although I'd like to have done.  I did learn ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs once to the point of being able to translate various common inscriptions on tombs and stuff though.
*

Its not really needed- just that if you don't understand a term or a name then you can tell what it means. Right handed molecules are called the D-form because if the latin Dexter (I think, correct me if I am wrong) so if you forget which one it is you can tell by the name.
damaged_roses
salve! quid est? tu est multus ridiculus! ego tu irrideo. Latina est multus ludus! tu non meus verbus.

Translation: Hello! What is it? You are very funny! I ridicule you. Latin is very fun! You do not understand my words.

Anyone else around here study Latin???
damaged_roses
QUOTE (Daria @ Feb 12 2006, 07:02 AM)
QUOTE (exceptional1709 @ Dec 31 2005, 10:06 PM)
Oh great, I'm going to be doing Chemistry A level and I have never had the chance to learn Latin, although I'd like to have done.  I did learn ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs once to the point of being able to translate various common inscriptions on tombs and stuff though.
*

Its not really needed- just that if you don't understand a term or a name then you can tell what it means. Right handed molecules are called the D-form because if the latin Dexter (I think, correct me if I am wrong) so if you forget which one it is you can tell by the name.
*


yeah, you're right. you just can't add macrons on the computer.
FeralPolyglot
Regarding the Tolkien Elvish Languages: I prefer Sindarin to Quenya. The phonological constraints of Quenya seemed a lot more regimented than I'd prefer. Sindarin also seemed to have a smoother flow. (I too used Ardalambion for the corpus of Sindarin.)

Regarding Gaelic: I spent a summer a few years ago studying Gaelic. (Though I don't remember enough to be of much use.) I was looking at Irish Gaelic which, as far as I know, is noticeably different from Scottish or Manx. I used websites I found online and I purchased a "Teach Yourself: Gaelic" tape/book set. It was helpful for the pronunciations. Websites can be found through google or other browsers. I don't remember exactly which site I used.

Regarding Sanskrit: I was under the impression that Sanskrit was used (at least nowadays) exclusively in sacred literature. I didn't think that it was used conversationally.
Verucca
Salvete! Lingua latina pulchra praecipue est. Roma aeterna! ph34r.gif

Daj acz ja pobruszę a ty poczywaj. <- this is the oldest known statement in ancient Polish. It means - Let me work (with grain) now, you get some rest. (a man says to his wife while they are producing flour.)

probably every existing language has it's older version that can be called ancient, apart from the invented ones.
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