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Righteous
Looking at the English-English translations in Pab's thread made me think. From all you cats here, I've learned a bit about the various forms of English floating around the world.

I've quoted UK folks I've met and had to translate words like "holiday" and "fag" to their American counterparts and explain that there are more uses for the word "cheers" then what you say before slamming down a brew. "Why do they use different words like that?" "I don't know, man. They just do." I once saw a cartoon where these two Americans were working a store in London. A guy came in saying, "Pack of fags," to which one replied, "What'd you call us?" "No, it's a cigarette, mate," "I ain't your mate." The Meaning of Life was fun. "What pictures is he talking about?" "That's what they call movie theaters," "Well, why can't they just call them movie theaters?" (Ri slaps head)

When I went to Orlando, I met a lot of UK folks (many of which thought that the rest of Florida is like this, much like most of the people in US believe) and was able to understand what they were saying. It was a real "when in Rome" thing. I like being able to talk to UK visitors. It's fun.

Any thoughts on the crazy English-ness around the world? I know we've all had fun with this, I'm sure.
Ashbless
An American / Canadian disagreement as to meaning is the phrase "to table something"
If a Canadian tables something - it means it's brought out to be discussed and dealt with. If an American tables it - then it's been put to the side for discussion/solving some other time. Canadians tend to shelve it for later.
Righteous
I haven't had much problem with Canadian English. I've been down with it more than I was UK English at first.
Ashbless
Well, A lot of Canadian kids & adults watch American TV programs so it's not to surprising that there's a lot of similarities.

I thought it amusing in the film " Meet Joe Black" that the old lady, speaking english in the hospital with admittedly with a strong Florida keys accent, was subtitled in english.
CommieBastard
QUOTE (Ashbless @ Sep 24 2004, 04:29 AM)
An American / Canadian disagreement as to meaning is the phrase "to table something"
If a Canadian tables something - it means it's brought out to be discussed and dealt with.  If an American tables it - then it's been put to the side for discussion/solving some other time.  Canadians tend to shelve it for later.
*


While "table" does exist in UK English as a verb, it's only used formally - once I was a delegate to the Model United Nations, and I tabled a motion. Motions are the only thing you table, really.
PsychWardMike
Hey Ri... Digging the Clerks Animated Series reference, man. Good stuff... good stuff. Anyway, English is fun! I can pretty much figure out a conversation with any English - Irish, British, Australian, American (save some ghetto speak.)

Engrish, however... that's a different story.
Ashbless
Just remember 'r' and 'l' are interchangable. As well 'n' and 'm' are the same sound and everything becomes clear and understandable.

English is a rough language to try to learn so I am impressed by those who chose to do so later in life. I've only the one language that I can mangle.
gothictheysay
Mmmhmmm...yup...the English language...the English language and its various forms...hey, I'm a grammar nazi by trade...the ellipses are an intended effect...
artist.unknown
QUOTE
Mmmhmmm...yup...the English language...the English language and its various forms...

Righteous, dude, you've been pwned. ^^

Effingpot is a humourous English-American dictionary. It's a funny read, going both ways.
Righteous
QUOTE (gothictheysay @ Sep 27 2004, 01:25 AM)
Mmmhmmm...yup...the English language...the English language and its various forms...hey, I'm a grammar nazi by trade...the ellipses are an intended effect...
*

Yeah, I was slightly buzzed when I wrote that. I noticed it later and it's been bugging me since.

It took me a half hour to explain to my brother the difference between chips, fries, chips and crisps. It was the difference between US chips and UK chips that got him. "So they call fries chips?" "Yeah." "So what are chips again?" "Fries." "No American chips." "Crisps." "Why din't they just call them chips?" "Cause that's what they call fries." "Chips?" "Yeah." "I thought they called them crisps." (Ri slaps head)

I needed a fag after that. tongue.gif

If you've seen Eurotrip, you may recall the conversation Cooper had with the rabid football fan (another cookie translation) where the rabid fan was going off using terms Coop had never heard and during a pause said, "Dude, you guys are on a whole different levevel of swearing than we are."

A similar conversation on football:
"So what do they call soccer in England?" "Football." "Well, what do they call football?" "Football's still football, but they call it American football." "What do they call American soccer?" "Football." "Wait, what's football again?" (Ri slaps head)
The Tortured Soul
are these convos with your brother???

what annoys me is how ppl over here are starting to use american dilect (sp? and is that the right word)

there are some people that call chips fries, criptill generally crisp, but every now and again i hear american stuff spewing out of ppls mouths, generally the kind of people that listen to american rap music and almost forget they are english...
CommieBastard
I always saw fries and chips as two different things. You get fries in McDonald's, you get chips at the chippie. Chips are thick cut, fries are not.
Righteous
QUOTE (The Tortured Soul @ Sep 27 2004, 05:35 PM)
are these convos with your brother???
*

No, man. Just the chips vs. fries vs. chips vs crisps debate. I've had similar conversations with other friends. They get confused because they're only used to American dialect.

And we call the thick-cut ones fries too, Sean. You're such a cigarette. wink.gif
Pikasyuu
One thing that really amazed me - tw*t is pronounced differently. I said it on the phone with Dayan, and he was absolutely confused, but when he said it, I told him he was saying it wrong .. and then we checked with British and American forumites only to find out the vowel is just different.
CommieBastard
QUOTE (syuu @ Sep 28 2004, 03:01 AM)
One thing that really amazed me - tw*t is pronounced differently. I said it on the phone with Dayan, and he was absolutely confused, but when he said it, I told him he was saying it wrong .. and then we checked with British and American forumites only to find out the vowel is just different.
*


That's weird...so the way Americans say it doesn't rhyme with "cat"? How on Earth do you say it?
helicopter pilot
i'm in new zealand, and we have bits from both american-english and british-english,
but we couldn't be bothered differentiating between fries/crisps/chips so we call them all chips. it's easier.
more american-isms are starting to creep in to peoples speech though.
Usurper MrTeapot
One that amuses me and always will is how Fanny means bum in america but something in the wrong area in the UK. Great when my american born cousin comes over and talks about how she "bruised her fanny".

*immature giggle*
Ashbless
Tw*t is pronounced with an 'ah' sound. Almost like watt as in lightbulb.
smallcuteanddeadly
I've been sat here for five minutes or so trying to say it with the American accent. I physically can't do it.

I used to get accused of faking an American accent at school. It wasn't intentional. It was a Dutch accent. But that led to some funny conversations once people twigged.

I had a funny incedent a few weeks ago when my 2 year old (who speaks Dutch) was asking my boyfriend for a peanut butter sandwich. The Dutch word for it is pinda-kaas. Literal translation is peanut cheese. He picked up on the cheese but failed to see what peanuts had to do with sandwiches. It was funny watching them trying to get accross to each other what it was they wanted. The 2 year old was saying it all very slowly and very loudly, with a facial expression that clearly said "You're a bit dense really, aren't you" . I would've helped but I could hardly breathe for laughing.

Since then she's developed her verbal skills a little and now asks him for penguin cheese sandwiches...
snooodlysnoosnoosnoodle
QUOTE
Effingpot is a humourous English-American dictionary. It's a funny read, going both ways.


Although that is a good website it is a little outdated in places.

For example number plates now have a different format to the one he describes
Pab
QUOTE (Ashbless @ Sep 28 2004, 02:11 PM)
Tw*t is pronounced with an 'ah' sound.  Almost like watt as in lightbulb.
*



wha .. b .. you .. say ... buh .. WHAT?!?!? ... I ... but ...


*is speachless*
Polocrunch
*Snigger*

"Twot". That's funny.
beleraphon
Try asking the average American what 'bugger' means.

The guy who wrote Buffy the vampire slayer though it was a mild english curse word like 'drat' or 'darn', and included it in more that a few of Giles' lines. Then wondered why the BBC were so insistant on being able to sound-edit the show for the 6pm slot!

Another fun one to mark the difference between the UK and a lot of other places. The UK is one of the few places where buildings have a ground floor, then 1,2,3,4,etc... The USA and quite a few other places such as Japan start at the 1st floor and go up.
gothictheysay
QUOTE
Try asking the average American what 'bugger' means.

The guy who wrote Buffy the vampire slayer though it was a mild english curse word like 'drat' or 'darn',


Correct me please... tongue.gif
Ashbless
There is also the amusing UK word 'rubber' for an eraser. A rubber in Canada is a condom. So you may or may not want to ask the cute girl beside you for a rubber in class.
Righteous
QUOTE (beleraphon @ Sep 28 2004, 06:36 PM)
Try asking the average American what 'bugger' means.

Heh. I've known what it means since the sixth grade. I learned it from a buddy of mine during woodshop. I'll call my friends "bugger" to throw them off. "Don't be such a little bitch, you bugger." "Is that another one of those weird English words?"

QUOTE
Another fun one to mark the difference between the UK and a lot of other places. The UK is one of the few places where buildings have a ground floor, then 1,2,3,4,etc...  The USA  and quite a few other places such as Japan start at the 1st floor and go up.
*

Yeah, it took me forever to get that when I went to Mexico. I'm glad I did, though. It cleared a lot of things up.

Aren't there certain swear words (or their equivalents) you cats abroad can get away with that we in the States can't? I know you can say "bugger" all you want here and no one'll care. That's about it.
Usurper MrTeapot
When I went to the US with a friend he used to call everyone a wanker. Just did so with a smile on his face and waved. Most people thought he was complimenting them and waved back.
CommieBastard
QUOTE (Righteous @ Sep 29 2004, 05:15 AM)
Aren't there certain swear words (or their equivalents) you cats abroad can get away with that we in the States can't? I know you can say "bugger" all you want here and no one'll care. That's about it.
*


I think we here in the UK are more casual about swearing that you are in the US, in general. A lot of times I've heard Americans complain about somebody's language when I wouldn't even have considered it a curse word...
beleraphon
Blasphemy is much more frowned upon as well, particularly in the more extreme god-fearing states.
Ashbless
Use the french words for sacred blue and church casually in conversation in Quebec and just look at all the strange looks you get. "Sacre blue" and "Tabernac" are odd swear words but they use 'em.

QUOTE
Polocrunch Posted Yesterday, 10:31 AM
  *Snigger*

"Twot". That's funny.


Admittedly I don't think I've ever heard "twot" used often. I think in that case the swear of choice would be c*nt.
Righteous
QUOTE (MrTeapot @ Sep 29 2004, 05:07 AM)
When I went to the US with a friend he used to call everyone a wanker. Just did so with a smile on his face and waved. Most people thought he was complimenting them and waved back.
*

Heh. That is fun. My favored term is "wankoff." Only a few of my friends and my brother know what it means. "Shut up, ya wankoff." "You're American! Call him a jerkoff."

QUOTE
There is also the amusing UK word 'rubber' for an eraser. A rubber in Canada is a condom. So you may or may not want to ask the cute girl beside you for a rubber in class.

Yeah, when I heard that, I thought it was hilarious.

QUOTE
A lot of times I've heard Americans complain about somebody's language when I wouldn't even have considered it a curse word...

That's happened to me on more than one occasion. Apparently "sucks" is at par with "sh*t" and "f*ck." You get a double-dose of unneeded stress when you say "Goddamn." It's both swearing and blasphemy.
Polocrunch
Ashbless: 'rubber', meaning 'condom', has entered the British dialect now. However, we do still use it for the material and instead of 'eraser' too.

Ri: a Briton would probably say 'you little bugger' rather than 'you bugger'. There are subtle nuances to the word's use.

EDIT: Also, we say 'swearword' rather than 'curseword'. Swearing is cursing; don't know if that's the same across the Pond. Swearing also means taking an oath, or giving your word, same as over there.
Usurper MrTeapot
We tend to call a Rubber meaning Condom a Rubber Jonny instead. always got a snigger when we asked Jonny to pass a rubber.
Polocrunch
I've never heard 'rubber Jonny'. Possibly that comes from 'Mr Johnson', as in 'penis'.
Righteous
QUOTE (Polocrunch @ Sep 29 2004, 11:37 AM)
Ri: a Briton would probably say 'you little bugger' rather than 'you bugger'. There are subtle nuances to the word's use.

Good to know, Polo.

QUOTE
Also, we say 'swearword' rather than 'curseword'. Swearing is cursing; don't know if that's the same across the Pond.
*

Yeah, in casual conversation here, curse and swear mean the same thing, as in to say bad words. They have their seperate meanings obviously, but they share the same definition with the general populace.
gothictheysay
I still don't know what bugger means...

QUOTE
A lot of times I've heard Americans complain about somebody's language


Here are the extremes: when "crap" is counted as a bad word. But I do have some churchgoing friends that abhor swears, and a few friends who have NEVER uttered the f-word. The other extreme is what Mata loves to hate, sentences peppered with desensitizing f-words and obscenities. We tend to either overuse swearing or back away from it as if it were the plague rather than do it just right...
Quoth(The Raven)
Do you Brits still say, "I'll knock you up", meaning to come round to your residence? To an American, it has a different connotation, entirely... laugh.gif
beleraphon
to 'knock you up' is still used in some parts of the north and midlands, to mean to wake someone up by knocking on the door.
In some of the old mining towns a 'knocker' was a lad employed to go round the miners houses and bang on the doors an hour before the mine started in the morning as unlike factories mines often didn't have whistles or hooters.
Other than that to be 'knocked up' is a slang term for becoming pregnant.

And for gothictheysay, 'bugger' is a term for anal sex and 'buggers' the practicers of anal sex.
So now you know.
Somehow its not a particularly aggressive obsenity though.
Aislinn Faye
Oh.. in some European country my dad was at when he was in the military, this lady said "Come knock me and my daughter up".. and dad was like "What?!....you want me to knock you and your daughter up?" after my dad asking her over and over again out of disbelief she finally got her point acrossed." Oh, and another thing.. swearing, cursing... I always called it "cussing" but eh..

"The Getaway" is a fun game for Americans (like myself), because of the dialect, so is Eddie Izzard. wub.gif
Usurper MrTeapot
QUOTE (Aislinn Faye @ Sep 30 2004, 11:40 AM)
Oh, and another thing.. swearing, cursing... I always called it "cussing" but eh...
*


I've never liked that. It was used only in primary school playgrounds and adopted by rude boys or pikeys. So it was generally always me who was 'cussed'.
the lil' pie fairy
Bloody pikeys.
I can't say tw*t the American way either...it's just too strange. Somehow removes all the emphasis *shrug*
Pab
QUOTE (Polocrunch @ Sep 29 2004, 06:43 PM)
I've never heard 'rubber Jonny'. Possibly that comes from 'Mr Johnson', as in 'penis'.
*



Rubber Johnny .. yup ... that were used in mah day
Snugglebum the Destroyer
QUOTE
Rubber Johnny .. yup ... that were used in mah day


Heard that a lot when I was a kid.

You're really not THAT old, Pab... rolleyes.gif
Righteous
QUOTE (Pab @ Sep 30 2004, 11:28 AM)
Rubber Johnny .. yup ... that were used in mah day
*

When I hear that, I think of the portable boyfriends you can buy at Sunset Novelties for twenty bucks that come in a variety of colors.

The spelling gets me sometimes. You UK cats use a lot of 'U's, colour, honour, flavour, humour, etc.
Polocrunch
That's because we've kept a lot of French spellings, while you in North America seem to have rationalised a lot.
Aislinn Faye
Gah.. I don't know how to quote.. anyway.. I prefer the French/British spelling to things like honour and colour.. it just looks better... but I can't stand substituting and "s" or a "z" or a "y" for a "i" like.. tyre... that's just.. unfathomable... I can't even began to comprehend that.. not that it's like.. completely wrong, it just looks weird to me.
Polocrunch
With Y's instead of some I's, you can differentiate between separate words:

The tyres tired easily in Tyre!

And that's about the only example I can think of...
Righteous
QUOTE (Polocrunch @ Oct 1 2004, 11:07 AM)
That's because we've kept a lot of French spellings, while you in North America seem to have rationalised a lot.
*

Not neccesarily. The Canadians still spell with a lot of "U"s.

QUOTE
I prefer the French/British spelling to things like honour and colour.. it just looks better...

A lot of people think it more upscale. I don't know if you've gone to the Plantation (this big ritzy private community), but they use UK spellings on signs and what-not. Maybe they have the whole "British debonair" idea that my grandmama applies to herself, even though she's Chinese and was born in Jamaica.
helicopter pilot
the American spelling of words with the letter 'Z' where we use an 'S' seems so weird. it just doesn't look right. it lets us know when our lecturers have taken their lecture notes directly out of textbooks though, when they are full of american spellings.

color, favorite, specialize.

they don't look right.
lygophilia
QUOTE (Righteous @ Sep 29 2004, 07:42 AM)
QUOTE (MrTeapot @ Sep 29 2004, 05:07 AM)
When I went to the US with a friend he used to call everyone a wanker. Just did so with a smile on his face and waved. Most people thought he was complimenting them and waved back.
*
Heh. That is fun. My favored term is "wankoff." Only a few of my friends and my brother know what it means. "Shut up, ya wankoff." "You're American! Call him a jerkoff."
*
Okay, so "wanker" is a term. I knew I heard it somewhere. I asked this guy in my class what it meant, thinking it was ghetto slang, and he had no idea what I was talking about. ...and now I'm pretty sure what it means...I think. wink.gif
QUOTE
this lady said "Come knock me and my daughter up".. and dad was like "What?!....you want me to knock you and your daughter up?"
teehee tongue.gif
QUOTE
I prefer the French/British spelling to things like honour and colour.. it just looks better...
Me too. I started using it for a while on things like my site, but changed it. I figured it made me a "wannabe"...British person. Although I might just be (a "wannabe")... unsure.gif Ooh! Wait, I am! (British) biggrin.gif I have no idea how much, but I am part british, but it's a lot less than 1/4. dry.gif
QUOTE
And for gothictheysay, 'bugger' is a term for anal sex and 'buggers' the practicers of anal sex.
blink.gif That's what it means?! ...wow. Well, I'm kinda glad I never used that term, not knowing what it meant. And calling someone that is an insult...right? huh.gif And it's used as a verb, too, isn't it? Something like the f word maybe? "to bugger something up"? Can't it be used like "aw bugger!" or something?
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